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kingrutland
10-12-2017, 01:06 AM
Did a forum search, all I found was people asking if others weigh their food, not how to weight correctly.

On every nutritional label on the foods I buy or look at, every macro is for x amount of cooked food. I have been measuring my food cooked since I started meal prepping.

After reading a few replies in other posts, I assume I am doing this wrong and I should be weighing my food raw? Problem is, I don't know the nutritional information of the raw food, is it any different to cooked? (usually grilled/baked/steamed), never fried.

raw food weighs x amount, same amount cooked now weighs something different. Can someone explain how they weigh their raw food in regards to calculating the macros and weight of the now cooked food.

Like I said, I have done a search but did not find a detailed post in regards to weighing your food correctly, even google threw me some real garbage.

Can anyone link me up? or explain in here please.

3maj
10-12-2017, 01:38 AM
Did a forum search, all I found was people asking if others weigh their food, not how to weight correctly.

On every nutritional label on the foods I buy or look at, every macro is for x amount of cooked food. I have been measuring my food cooked since I started meal prepping.

After reading a few replies in other posts, I assume I am doing this wrong and I should be weighing my food raw? Problem is, I don't know the nutritional information of the raw food, is it any different to cooked? (usually grilled/baked/steamed), never fried.

raw food weighs x amount, same amount cooked now weighs something different. Can someone explain how they weigh their raw food in regards to calculating the macros and weight of the now cooked food.

Like I said, I have done a search but did not find a detailed post in regards to weighing your food correctly, even google threw me some real garbage.

Can anyone link me up? or explain in here please.

Labels on raw food are for raw weight.

Labels on cooked food are for cooked weight.

What's confusing you?

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 01:51 AM
Labels on raw food are for raw weight.

Labels on cooked food are for cooked weight.

What's confusing you?

From my local supermarket, the labels on raw chicken state the macro's in its cooked state, not raw state. After looking into this more, I have found one article which has helped, but after looking through it, it looks like the labels on ALL the packaging in my local supermarket are WAY, WAY off.

For example, 100g Green Lentils.
Supermarket: 106kcal, 8.1P, 12C, 0.8F
CalorieKing: 213kcal, 13.8P, 37.5C, 1.2F

The difference is, supermarket is showing data for 100g cooked lentils, whilst calorie king is showing data for 100g raw lentils. NONE of the labels in local shop are for food in its raw state. Might be a UK thing.

it also means I have to rip my current meal plan up and start again as all my macros will be crazy different.

philgriffiths
10-12-2017, 02:08 AM
It's more than likely just a misunderstanding on your part.
I just checked the tesco website for example for all their different types of green lentils and the two packs of raw green lentils state about 290cals/100g (uncooked), where as the tinned green lentils state 95cals/100g (but these are already cooked in the tin, hence the difference).

That's not to say you don't have to throw out your meal plan and recalculate (I've had to do this before with rice, as I cocked up and was eating 500cals instead of 100 - but that was my mistake, not the supermarket or packaging or whatever - you live and you learn)

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 02:11 AM
Oh yeah, im not saying at all this is the supermarkets fault, this is a noob mistake I have made and just trying to understand it more and learn how to not make the same mistake again.

I typically use Asda as they are the closest store to me (just round the corner), if you look at the good & balanced dried green lentils which is what i was looking at, you will see only cooked data.

Ahwell live and learn, now on MFP recalculating everything.

Also, when working out carb intake, I have seen people use different approaches, some way total carbs, some way carbs minus fibre - is there a specific one I should be doing? I have just been using total carbs.

3maj
10-12-2017, 02:29 AM
Wait, you're saying that the label on uncooked, dry lentils shows nutritional values for cooked product? That's very odd.

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 02:32 AM
Wait, you're saying that the label on uncooked, dry lentils shows nutritional values for cooked product? That's very odd.

Yes, its pretty much the same for the entire shop, every single product lists data in its cooked form. For instance, bell peppers show the nutritional values after its been stir-fried. Its crazy! Thats why I have been so confused with it all.

Mikeez0
10-12-2017, 03:23 AM
Yes, its pretty much the same for the entire shop, every single product lists data in its cooked form. For instance, bell peppers show the nutritional values after its been stir-fried. Its crazy! Thats why I have been so confused with it all.Just use google calories or go for myfitnesspal and input "raw"; "raw pepper", "raw tomato" etc

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 03:26 AM
Just use google calories or go for myfitnesspal and input "raw"; "raw pepper", "raw tomato" etc

That is what I am doing now, huge difference in the macro's in meals now.
Looks like i was eating a lot more carbs than I realised.
Do people recommend total carbs or net carbs for macros?

elephantstone
10-12-2017, 03:38 AM
Hi mate, fellow Brit here. I've also had this problem in the past with other UK supermarkets. What you'll tend to find with the uncooked grains/pulses etc. is that although the packaging provides nutritional values for cooked weight, there's usually a little tidbit that says (for example, not accurate) something like '30g raw weighs approximately 80g when cooked'.

It makes it a bit awkward and you might have to do your own calculations and even input your own food on the MFP database (I've done this with a number of pulses sold by Tesco) but you can accurately calculate the calories and macros this way rather than having to guess how much raw food you're going to need to get X cooked amount on each occasion. Hope this helps.

Mikeez0
10-12-2017, 03:44 AM
That is what I am doing now, huge difference in the macro's in meals now.
Looks like i was eating a lot more carbs than I realised.
Do people recommend total carbs or net carbs for macros?Go for total carbs and total calories.

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 03:44 AM
Hi mate, fellow Brit here. I've also had this problem in the past with other UK supermarkets. What you'll tend to find with the uncooked grains/pulses etc. is that although the packaging provides nutritional values for cooked weight, there's usually a little tidbit that says (for example, not accurate) something like '30g raw weighs approximately 80g when cooked'.

It makes it a bit awkward and you might have to do your own calculations and even input your own food on the MFP database (I've done this with a number of pulses sold by Tesco) but you can accurately calculate the calories and macros this way rather than having to guess how much raw food you're going to need to get X cooked amount on each occasion. Hope this helps.

Hmmm, UK supermarkets suck. If you look at the veg for instance, every single data for carbs is way, way off the mark. e.g. Asda broc**** 100g = 2.8g carbs, in reality more like 7g, im pretty sure looking at it again, most of the supermarkets are stating net carbs, is this to make the food look "healthier" to some people?

Im now calculating all my macro's and weights based of the raw food, cooking raw weight x5, then splitting cooked weight x5.

kingrutland
10-12-2017, 03:49 AM
Go for total carbs and total calories.

Thanks!