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View Full Version : How does my gym/nutrition routine sound?



Godswill1097
08-15-2017, 11:42 AM
To start off, I'm 5'11", 20 years old and I would guess around 250-270lb.

I've been going to the gym fairly regularly over the last month or so, doing gym, rest, gym, rest, gym, rest, gym for a typical week. For this I'll do 20-30 mins cardio (Elliptical, short term HIIT on the stationary bike), then I'll move to weight machines (Pec deck, Shoulder press, seated row, seated dip, tricep push, bicep curl to name a few) for around 45 mins. I don't have specific days for each muscle group, I just work on everything each gym session.

My diet is looking good, most days I'll make bacon (grilled) and 3 eggs (scrambled), this gives me protein and keeps my calories low (400 ish). Most days I'll only eat breakfast and dinner, sometimes with a snack in between. Dinner is usually chicken breast with either rice or sweet potatoes and some veg, peppers/spinach. I'll add a sauce to give it some flavour and this usually ends up being 500-750 cals depending on what I end up having. Most days I'll finish on 1100-1500 calories of food, and if I've been to the gym thats a min of 250 cals burned through cardio. I try and keep 1500 as my calorie max intake.

Today I had bacon and eggs, a protein shake after the gym, and chicken and sweet potato for dinner which brought me to 1200 of food, with 250 burned at the gym.

Do these numbers sound good? I try and keep carbs low and protein high as a rule of thumb. Will this result in fat loss for me?

bindz00
08-15-2017, 11:51 AM
To start off, I'm 5'11", 20 years old and I would guess around 250-270lb.

I've been going to the gym fairly regularly over the last month or so, doing gym, rest, gym, rest, gym, rest, gym for a typical week. For this I'll do 20-30 mins cardio (Elliptical, short term HIIT on the stationary bike), then I'll move to weight machines (Pec deck, Shoulder press, seated row, seated dip, tricep push, bicep curl to name a few) for around 45 mins. I don't have specific days for each muscle group, I just work on everything each gym session.

My diet is looking good, most days I'll make bacon (grilled) and 3 eggs (scrambled), this gives me protein and keeps my calories low (400 ish). Most days I'll only eat breakfast and dinner, sometimes with a snack in between. Dinner is usually chicken breast with either rice or sweet potatoes and some veg, peppers/spinach. I'll add a sauce to give it some flavour and this usually ends up being 500-750 cals depending on what I end up having. Most days I'll finish on 1100-1500 calories of food, and if I've been to the gym thats a min of 250 cals burned through cardio. I try and keep 1500 as my calorie max intake.

Today I had bacon and eggs, a protein shake after the gym, and chicken and sweet potato for dinner which brought me to 1200 of food, with 250 burned at the gym.

Do these numbers sound good? I try and keep carbs low and protein high as a rule of thumb. Will this result in fat loss for me?


NoNoNoNo.
NO.
Read the stickies dude!
In short, find a TDEE calculator to find the number of calories you need to maintain your weight. Eat below that amount by around 200-400 calories. You need to also track your macronutrients. Get 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight, and around 0.4g of fat per pound of body weight, with the rest of the calories as carbs.

You need a beginners routine as you are ''just working on everything in each gym session''. Starting strength has yielded spectacular results for loads of people so I suggest you investigate.

In very short. DO SOME RESEARCH.

kitpapa
08-15-2017, 12:04 PM
NoNoNoNo.
NO.
Read the stickies dude!
In short, find a TDEE calculator to find the number of calories you need to maintain your weight. Eat below that amount by around 200-400 calories. You need to also track your macronutrients. Get 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight, and around 0.4g of fat per pound of body weight, with the rest of the calories as carbs.

You need a beginners routine as you are ''just working on everything in each gym session''. Starting strength has yielded spectacular results for loads of people so I suggest you investigate.

In very short. DO SOME RESEARCH.

Cannot say this^^^ enough.

Your "plans are not pplans at all. You are winging it and it will get you nowhere. This is terrible

drewott
08-15-2017, 12:28 PM
Ok, you've completed step one: doing something to make changes. The fact that you are going to the gym, eating better and asking on this forum for help is good.

That being said, you are going about it in a way that will not provide optimal results (or any results) and will end in a burnout due to a lack of palpable changes. What you need to do is direct your focus onto things that are proven to work.

First correct your diet. Now when you hear the word diet it likely brings to mind things like: Atkins, low carb, south beach, weight watchers etc. These are diet plans and are not necessary. These plans can and do work for many people, but they are not necessary. You need to know what you eat and how much of it. You need to focus on calories and macros (carbs, fat, protein). Keep track of them and keep the amounts in line with your TDEE. (Google TDEE calculator to get that number). My *guess* for you would be around 2300kcals/day. This could be wrong, but its not a bad place to start given your weight.

Second, correct your gym routine. Cardio is helpful for fat loss and overall conditioning. It isn't necessary to lose fat but thats no reason to stop. However, you should focus more on your lifting. Do a beginners program, particularly starting strength or stronglifts. These routines take advantage of your untrained state and will make you stronger, improve your central nervous system and get you more in tune with how your muscles work. Follow the program, do not mess around with lifts (like swapping squat for something else because its uncomfortable/scary/seems dangerous).

Third, you need data. This is not essential but is not overly difficult and the benefits are immense. You said you weigh somewhere between 250 and 270. Thats a wide range. Get on a scale and record your weight, today. Then weigh yourself on a schedule (once a week at most). That will give you something to compare against. Taking photos is a good idea too (and you will be happy for it when you reach the end/near the end so you can see the change). Also, track your calories/macros. This also gives you data to compare. If you know you are eating 2300 kcals per day and you are not losing weight it will be easy to take it down to 2000 kcals and see if change happens there. Without tracking you end up guessing. No sense in guessing if you dont need to.

Keep up the motivation. If you do the things suggested by others in this thread and make changes to nutrition and training you are guaranteed to progress. If you don't change something you will not progress. It is up to you.

Godswill1097
08-15-2017, 12:32 PM
NoNoNoNo.
NO.
Read the stickies dude!
In short, find a TDEE calculator to find the number of calories you need to maintain your weight. Eat below that amount by around 200-400 calories. You need to also track your macronutrients. Get 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight, and around 0.4g of fat per pound of body weight, with the rest of the calories as carbs.

You need a beginners routine as you are ''just working on everything in each gym session''. Starting strength has yielded spectacular results for loads of people so I suggest you investigate.

In very short. DO SOME RESEARCH.

I've done research but according to the TDEE calc I need 2,714 cals for maintenance. It also tells me that for fat loss I should take in 2,214 cals with a 40/40/20 split of protein/fats/carbs. To me this seems excessive

drewott
08-15-2017, 12:49 PM
I've done research but according to the TDEE calc I need 2,714 cals for maintenance. It also tells me that for fat loss I should take in 2,214 cals with a 40/40/20 split of protein/fats/carbs. To me this seems excessive

On what are you basing this determination that the TDEE results are excessive?

From your numbers above (1200kcal eaten, 250kcal burned) you had an intake today of 950kcals. That is absurdly low for a 250-270lb 20 year old man. Get over the idea that you need to be hungry when losing fat, that you need to eat only celery and other bull****.

Go for the TDEE amount and try it. Really monitor what you eat and make good choices. When I was at 250-270lbs I ate around 2500kcals a day and stripped off fat like a boss. When I got lower weight I lowered the kcals. While it is a good thing to question the wisdom of others, it is not a good thing when you know nothing and the wisdom being imparted is from people with more knowledge and expertise. At this point you know nothing. Get used to that and start learning. When you've gotten the basics down and know what works for you, then you can start questioning the integrity of the law of thermodynamics. I am sure some physicists would love to hear about it.

Godswill1097
08-15-2017, 01:04 PM
On what are you basing this determination that the TDEE results are excessive?

From your numbers above (1200kcal eaten, 250kcal burned) you had an intake today of 950kcals. That is absurdly low for a 250-270lb 20 year old man. Get over the idea that you need to be hungry when losing fat, that you need to eat only celery and other bull****.

Go for the TDEE amount and try it. Really monitor what you eat and make good choices. When I was at 250-270lbs I ate around 2500kcals a day and stripped off fat like a boss. When I got lower weight I lowered the kcals. While it is a good thing to question the wisdom of others, it is not a good thing when you know nothing and the wisdom being imparted is from people with more knowledge and expertise. At this point you know nothing. Get used to that and start learning. When you've gotten the basics down and know what works for you, then you can start questioning the integrity of the law of thermodynamics. I am sure some physicists would love to hear about it.

I'm basing it on that I dont feel a lack of energy or feel hungry at all. I feel like if I try for 2,200 cals a day then I'll just be eating for the sake of it.

I'll input this into MFP and give it a go now. 2,200 cals with a 40/40/20 split of P, F, C. Would you recommend a change in my cardio routine at all?

I'll start a beginner lifting routine, however I don't know any of the exercises as I haven't used free weights before, so it would take me a while to get into the swing of lifting.

Also, if i've put my food into MFP and I'm under on any macros, is it essential I get to that goal, or is it a cap as such?

drewott
08-15-2017, 02:00 PM
Cardio for fat loss (it has other benefits) serves to burn calories. You have a routine for cardio, go ahead and keep it. I'd only scale it back if it gets in the way of lifting.

As for not knowing any exercises, that is normal. You will need to research proper form and focus on that proper form. Constantly be aware of form to prevent injury or improper training. There are tons of resources on proper form for the main lifts. I've been watching Alan Thrall's videos on YouTube. BB.com has information, and if you google 'proper squat form' you will have no shortage of explanations.

As far as getting to the cap for macros, no, you do not need to hit the numbers exactly when you are just starting out. Get used to the act of tracking. Keep your calories at or under the limit and keep your protein high for recovery. Be as accurate as you can. Don't guesstimate amounts or eyeball stuff. Weight it and measure it.