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y0lked
02-27-2017, 09:10 PM
Curious as to what everyone thinks is better in these situations. Just came across the answer in my sports nutrition textbook. GO!

1) high GI carbs vs low GI carbs for bulking/maintaining/performance
2) high GI carbs vs low GI carbs for cutting

AdamWW
02-27-2017, 09:18 PM
Curious as to what everyone thinks is better in these situations. Just came across the answer in my sports nutrition textbook. GO!

1) high GI carbs vs low GI carbs for bulking/maintaining/performance
2) high GI carbs vs low GI carbs for cutting

If you think your book has an answer, then sorry, it's wrong.

Everyone has their own preferences.

Mrpb
02-27-2017, 09:26 PM
In healthy active people: no significant differences as long as fiber, protein and fat are matched between diets.

And I'm guessing your text book had it wrong.

y0lked
02-27-2017, 09:49 PM
If you think your book has an answer, then sorry, it's wrong.

Everyone has their own preferences.


In healthy active people: no significant differences as long as fiber, protein and fat are matched between diets.

And I'm guessing your text book had it wrong.


do you even glycogen re-synthesis bros?
http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/victorious/images/1/12/Jlaw-okay.gif/revision/latest?cb=20120904161949

AdamWW
02-27-2017, 09:53 PM
do you even glycogen re-synthesis bros?
[img]http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/victorious/images/1/12/Jlaw-okay.gif/revision/latest?cb=20120904161949[img]

Ever heard of splitting hairs and wasting time focusing on things that don't matter in the grand scheme of things?

y0lked
02-27-2017, 10:11 PM
Ever heard of splitting hairs and wasting time focusing on things that don't matter in the grand scheme of things?

stop acting like youre better than everyone its just a damn discussion


smh

Mrpb
02-27-2017, 10:25 PM
do you even glycogen re-synthesis bros?


Like I mentioned: no significant difference between conditions.

And like I suspected: your text book probably has it wrong.

y0lked
02-27-2017, 10:29 PM
Like I mentioned: no significant difference between conditions.

And like I suspected: your text book probably has it wrong.

brb worlds leader in carbohydrate research is wrong but fellow miscer is right

gbullock32
02-27-2017, 10:34 PM
brb worlds leader in carbohydrate research is wrong but fellow miscer is rightThis isn't the misc.

AdamWW
02-27-2017, 10:34 PM
stop acting like youre better than everyone its just a damn discussion


smh

Thanks for the neg mr.sensitive. Cry me a river.

y0lked
02-27-2017, 10:37 PM
Thanks for the neg mr.sensitive. Cry me a river.

Yup negged for not contributing to the thread.

Mrpb
02-27-2017, 10:38 PM
Despite a sound theoretical basis, the practical significance of expeditiously repleting glycogen stores remains dubious. Without question, expediting glycogen resynthesis is important for a narrow subset of endurance sports where the duration between glycogen-depleting events is limited to less than approximately 8 hours [31]. Similar benefits could potentially be obtained by those who perform two-a-day split resistance training bouts (i.e. morning and evening) provided the same muscles will be worked during the respective sessions. However, for goals that are not specifically focused on the performance of multiple exercise bouts in the same day, the urgency of glycogen resynthesis is greatly diminished. High-intensity resistance training with moderate volume (6-9 sets per muscle group) has only been shown to reduce glycogen stores by 36-39% [8, 32]. Certain athletes are prone to performing significantly more volume than this (i.e., competitive bodybuilders), but increased volume typically accompanies decreased frequency. For example, training a muscle group with 16-20 sets in a single session is done roughly once per week, whereas routines with 8-10 sets are done twice per week. In scenarios of higher volume and frequency of resistance training, incomplete resynthesis of pre-training glycogen levels would not be a concern aside from the far-fetched scenario where exhaustive training bouts of the same muscles occur after recovery intervals shorter than 24 hours. However, even in the event of complete glycogen depletion, replenishment to pre-training levels occurs well-within this timeframe, regardless of a significantly delayed post-exercise carbohydrate intake. For example, Parkin et al [33] compared the immediate post-exercise ingestion of 5 high-glycemic carbohydrate meals with a 2-hour wait before beginning the recovery feedings. No significant between-group differences were seen in glycogen levels at 8 hours and 24 hours post-exercise. In further support of this point, Fox et al. [34] saw no significant reduction in glycogen content 24 hours after depletion despite adding 165 g fat collectively to the post-exercise recovery meals and thus removing any potential advantage of high-glycemic conditions.

https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

AdamWW
02-27-2017, 10:38 PM
Yup negged for not contributing to the thread.

Were you under the impression I care in the least? Oh no, I lost ever so precious rep points!! What ever shall I do!?!?

y0lked
02-27-2017, 10:54 PM
https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

from the study you quoted


Esmarck et al. [69] provided the first experimental evidence that consuming protein immediately after training enhanced muscular growth compared to delayed protein intake. Thirteen untrained elderly male volunteers were matched in pairs based on body composition and daily protein intake and divided into two groups: P0 or P2. Subjects performed a progressive resistance training program of multiple sets for the upper and lower body. P0 received an oral protein/carbohydrate supplement immediately post-exercise while P2 received the same supplement 2 hours following the exercise bout. Training was carried out 3 days a week for 12 weeks. At the end of the study period, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps femoris and mean fiber area were significantly increased in the P0 group while no significant increase was seen in P2. These results support the presence of a post-exercise window and suggest that delaying post-workout nutrient intake may impede muscular gains.

Now that we have established that there is a case for an anabolic window lets take it a step further. We know that the only way to shut off glucagon and stress hormones post exercise is through ATP replenishment and glycogen synthesis. By ingesting a high GI carbohydrate post workout we can stop glycogen breakdown quickly and promote AA uptake via higher blood insulin levels. This not only shows that High GI carbs are beneficial post exercise but that lipolysis and catabolic hormones (growth hormone) during training can be prolonged WITHOUT the insulin spike. A low GI carbohydrate would help, in a deficit, to prolong the effect of training on lipolysis.

While the big picture is important (cals in vs cals out) WHERE that energy comes from is also important.

Mrpb
02-27-2017, 11:02 PM
from the study you quoted

The study you quoted doesn't support your position about high GI vs. low GI.

If you have a relevant study, please cite it.

TailEnd
02-28-2017, 12:29 AM
http://www.directlyfitness.com/store/elements-challenging-glycemic-index/

Author - Alan Aragon

Cliffs - Trying to attribute weight loss/gain to the GI of carbs is over-simplistic. Don't major in the minors, the research doesn't currently support your position regardless of what your textbook says.

Mrpb
02-28-2017, 02:36 AM
http://www.directlyfitness.com/store/elements-challenging-glycemic-index/

Author - Alan Aragon

Cliffs - Trying to attribute weight loss/gain to the GI of carbs is over-simplistic. Don't major in the minors, the research doesn't currently support your position regardless of what your textbook says.

Lol.

Oatmealman99
02-28-2017, 07:12 AM
2017 and people think gi makes a difference.
http://i.imgur.com/7rZmRQB.gif

jdcole4
02-28-2017, 12:26 PM
Still haven't seen a study that shows significant differences. If you'd actually like to have a debate on the subject then provide some significant sources.