PDA

View Full Version : Empty-Calorie Carbonhydrates?



fairbjosh
01-06-2017, 06:39 AM
I was reading a couple of articles Alan Aragon wrote and mentioned Empty-Calorie Carbohydrates, I was curios if anybody could fill me in on exactly what this was?

I always assumed a calorie is a calorie and a macro is a macro, with that being said what is the difference if I consume Old Fashioned Quaker Oats and Quaker Instant Apple & Cinnamon Oatmeal. Does one have a different effect on gaining muscle or digesting?

desslok
01-06-2017, 06:43 AM
Empty-calorie carbs is a misnomer. But what people actually mean is micronutrient devoid calorie. For example eating pure table sugar vs eating an orange that contained the same number of carbs. No real direct effect on gaining muscle.

fairbjosh
01-06-2017, 07:01 AM
Empty-calorie carbs is a misnomer. But what people actually mean is micronutrient devoid calorie. For example eating pure table sugar vs eating an orange that contained the same number of carbs. No real direct effect on gaining muscle.

So the "Empty-Calorie" they're talking about is the micronutrient portion of the food.

juggernaut74ia
01-06-2017, 07:03 AM
So the "Empty-Calorie" they're talking about is the micronutrient portion of the food.

Generally speaking yes (if you want to give them the benefit of the doubt of being somewhat "informed")

Or they just learned a new buzzword from Dr. Oz and decided to start randomly applying it and judging other people's food choices in order to feel superior (much more likely in my experience)

EjnarKolinkar
01-06-2017, 07:20 AM
People get all kinds of wild ideas about "nutrient density" of foods. When in reality we all vary in our overall food choices, and our TDEE. What we are able to put together as a whole at the end of the day in terms of nutrition, and how that helps us progress toward our goals is the real target, not comparing one isolated food to another out of context.

desslok
01-06-2017, 09:15 AM
So the "Empty-Calorie" they're talking about is the micronutrient portion of the food.

Not just micronutrient, but fiber, phytonutrients, amino acids, etc.