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onequestion123
11-26-2016, 09:10 AM
Some say milk is good because of the calcium and protein but a lot of studies actually say it leeches calcium from the bones.

It is also cruel to the cows(in factory farms).

gbullock32
11-26-2016, 09:11 AM
Dairy is fantastic, those who say otherwise are idiots.

Chocolate milk is possibly the greatest drink ever.

AdamWW
11-26-2016, 10:06 AM
Some say milk is good because of the calcium and protein but a lot of studies actually say it leeches calcium from the bones.

It is also cruel to the cows(in factory farms).

Well animal cruelty in itself doesn't make something unhealthy.

Studies exist that support either end: for example, many studies show associations between yogurt consumption and lower incidence of certain diseases, while other studies show some forms of dairy (ie - butter) in certain amounts are strongly correlated to all-cause mortality. The problem is looking at a single food group in isolation and being able to actually prove cause and effect.

BuildKing
11-26-2016, 11:04 AM
Dairy is good in moderation.

ErikTheElectric
11-26-2016, 06:41 PM
Avoid thinking in terms of "bad" "Good" and "healthy vs unhealthy" OP.

RabbitFood197
11-26-2016, 06:47 PM
Some say milk is good because of the calcium and protein but a lot of studies actually say it leeches calcium from the bones.

It is also cruel to the cows(in factory farms).

I believe it can be. I read a couple of books talking about the issue of dairy and one of the repeating arguments was the way it slows down your digestion if consumed along with other foods. I believe that in moderation it can be beneficial, however, I would rather stick to getting vitamins and minerals from leafy greens, vegetables, and other plant based sources of vitamins and nutrients. What are your thoughts?
Here are the publications that talk a lot about this topic:

Mikhail Tombak - Can We Live 150 years? & Cure the incurable
Eat To Live - Joel Fuhrman

Hope it helps!

muruku
11-27-2016, 06:27 AM
dayum, I sure as well won't mind if somebody pays my rent and food and just wants to squeeze my tits all day.

muruku
11-27-2016, 06:28 AM
Op,

do you know what happens to male chicks?

muruku
11-27-2016, 06:30 AM
http://advances.nutrition.org/content/7/6/1026.full.pdf

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CxcCktSWQAE7ip3.jpg

muruku
11-27-2016, 06:32 AM
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/104/5/1209.abstract

Results: During 5,158,337 person-years of follow-up, we documented 14,815 incident CVD cases including 8974 coronary heart disease cases (nonfatal myocardial infarction or fatal coronary disease) and 5841 stroke cases. In multivariate analyses, compared with an equivalent amount of energy from carbohydrates (excluding fruit and vegetables), dairy fat intake was not significantly related to risk of total CVD (for a 5% increase in energy from dairy fat, the RR was 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.05), coronary heart disease (RR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.09), or stroke (RR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.05) (P > 0.05 for all). In models in which we estimated the effects of exchanging different fat sources, the replacement of 5% of energy intake from dairy fat with equivalent energy intake from polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or vegetable fat was associated with 24% (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.81) and 10% (RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.87, 0.93) lower risk of CVD, respectively, whereas the 5% energy intake substitution of other animal fat with dairy fat was associated with 6% increased CVD risk (RR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.09).

chemo29
11-27-2016, 07:03 AM
healthy or not, it sure is kraken delicious, and that's all that matters to me

#justepicurianguysthings

Mrpb
11-27-2016, 07:39 AM
Great source of protein, that's for sure.

As a source of calcium, it may not be ideal to prevent fractures. This was a decent article that summarizes some of the controversy around it: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/

Here's a new very positive review about dairy: http://www.foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/32527

Results: The most recent evidence suggested that intake of milk and dairy products was associated with reduced risk of childhood obesity. In adults, intake of dairy products was shown to improve body composition and facilitate weight loss during energy restriction. In addition, intake of milk and dairy products was associated with a neutral or reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly stroke. Furthermore, the evidence suggested a beneficial effect of milk and dairy intake on bone mineral density but no association with risk of bone fracture. Among cancers, milk and dairy intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, gastric cancer, and breast cancer, and not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, or lung cancer, while the evidence for prostate cancer risk was inconsistent. Finally, consumption of milk and dairy products was not associated with all-cause mortality. Calcium-fortified plant-based drinks have been included as an alternative to dairy products in the nutrition recommendations in several countries. However, nutritionally, cow’s milk and plant-based drinks are completely different foods, and an evidence-based conclusion on the health value of the plant-based drinks requires more studies in humans.

Conclusion: The totality of available scientific evidence supports that intake of milk and dairy products contribute to meet nutrient recommendations, and may protect against the most prevalent chronic diseases, whereas very few adverse effects have been reported.