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lookingguy
07-26-2016, 03:10 PM
Hello everyone;
So, I remember reading something about reducing the glycemic index of foods by combining them with another food that has an inferior glycemic index i.e. rich in fiber. So french baguette has a ridiculously high GI according to most charts and I was thinking that maybe if you are planning to eat a french baguette sandwich and you add some tomato slices then you would be reducing the overall GI of the sandwich.

Any suggestions would be really appreciated.

gbullock32
07-26-2016, 03:23 PM
Any suggestions would be really appreciated.

I suggest you stop caring about GI/GL unless you are diabetic because it wont matter.

magician27
07-26-2016, 06:27 PM
Hello everyone;
So, I remember reading something about reducing the glycemic index of foods by combining them with another food that has an inferior glycemic index i.e. rich in fiber. So french baguette has a ridiculously high GI according to most charts and I was thinking that maybe if you are planning to eat a french baguette sandwich and you add some tomato slices then you would be reducing the overall GI of the sandwich.

Any suggestions would be really appreciated.

are you diabetic ? otherwise worrying about this is highly moronic like mentioned

ErikTheElectric
07-26-2016, 08:13 PM
Protip: Stop caring about GI.

lmcfreekz
07-26-2016, 11:14 PM
Beyond following the above advice, the slight flaw in your logic is that adding stuff to the bread to make a sandwich isn't going to alter the bread itself...

But yeah, unless you're diabetic don't get too concerned with it... If you need to track for some reason, Glycemic Load (GL) is a better measure than GI

Mrpb
07-26-2016, 11:43 PM
Hello everyone;
So, I remember reading something about reducing the glycemic index of foods by combining them with another food that has an inferior glycemic index i.e. rich in fiber. So french baguette has a ridiculously high GI according to most charts and I was thinking that maybe if you are planning to eat a french baguette sandwich and you add some tomato slices then you would be reducing the overall GI of the sandwich.

Any suggestions would be really appreciated.

Eat it with protein and fat (like most people would anyway) and it will greatly reduce the speed of digestion and thus the GL.

chemo29
07-27-2016, 03:01 AM
cheese

rhadam
07-27-2016, 10:51 AM
Eat it with protein and fat (like most people would anyway) and it will greatly reduce the speed of digestion and thus the GL.

^

And GI doesn't matter for most of us.

Domicron
07-27-2016, 11:19 AM
cheese

a good answer, but i prefer Banh Mi
http://www.banhmimytho.com/uploads/8/0/3/6/8036944/8827224.jpg?524

lookingguy
07-28-2016, 04:25 AM
No, I am no diabetic but it is known that high GI food will cause you a blood sugar spike and when that happens your insulin stores most of that as fat. It's the reason why most people on these forums say you should eat whole wheat rice instead of white rice. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Kewbrah
07-28-2016, 04:29 AM
Butter it.

Mrpb
07-28-2016, 05:05 AM
No, I am no diabetic but it is known that high GI food will cause you a blood sugar spike and when that happens your insulin stores most of that as fat. It's the reason why most people on these forums say you should eat whole wheat rice instead of white rice. Correct me if I'm wrong.

The bold part is false. In order to achieve fat loss you need to be in energy deficit. Keeping insulin low isn't necessary nor proven beneficial.

If you're the kind of person that gets tired after eating high GL meals it's a good idea to eat lower GL meals.

And all males should make sure to get >30 gram fiber per day. This will be harder if you eat a lot of French bread.

muruku
07-28-2016, 06:24 AM
Boil it and drain it. removes all the soluble carbs which are mainly low molecular weight carbohydrates (i.e. mono- and disaccharides) .

lookingguy
07-28-2016, 04:08 PM
The bold part is false. In order to achieve fat loss you need to be in energy deficit. Keeping insulin low isn't necessary nor proven beneficial.

If you're the kind of person that gets tired after eating high GL meals it's a good idea to eat lower GL meals.

And all males should make sure to get >30 gram fiber per day. This will be harder if you eat a lot of French bread.

I'm not worried about losing fat, I'm worried about storing fat.

gbullock32
07-28-2016, 04:14 PM
I'm not worried about losing fat, I'm worried about storing fat.It still wont matter, you have no reason to worry about GI/GL.

Mrpb
07-29-2016, 12:31 AM
I'm not worried about losing fat, I'm worried about storing fat.

Same coin, other side. To gain fat you need to be in a surplus. Manipulating insulin levels isn't beneficial.

Make sure your diet reaches micros, macros and fiber (>30 gram). Don't worry about the GI/GL of your diet, unless you feel better on a lower GL diet.

EjnarKolinkar
07-29-2016, 01:14 AM
No, I am no diabetic but it is known that high GI food will cause you a blood sugar spike and when that happens your insulin stores most of that as fat. It's the reason why most people on these forums say you should eat whole wheat rice instead of white rice. Correct me if I'm wrong.

I put cinnamon sugar on my baguettes. Maybe fat gets stored, maybe it doesn't. On the bright side once fat is stored it isn't locked away forever. My body does not throw away the key, it's right there later when it's needed.

Over the course of the week what real difference does it make?


I'm not worried about losing fat, I'm worried about storing fat.

Exactly, and we aren't. Because storing fat happens. If you think you are going to live a life without storing fat, you are mistaken.

It's caloric surplus and the long term accumulation of excess fat stores that most of us would like to manage.

lookingguy
07-29-2016, 05:02 PM
Well GI is what determines whether a carb is simple or complex so saying that it doesn't matter is quite a risky statement.

Domicron
07-29-2016, 05:32 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong.

you're wrong. show me a recent quote of someone who has any idea what they're talking about is recommending "whole wheat rice"


Boil it and drain it. removes all the soluble carbs which are mainly low molecular weight carbohydrates (i.e. mono- and disaccharides) .

boil my baguette, brilliant. what if i steam it instead?


Well GI is what determines whether a carb is simple or complex so saying that it doesn't matter is quite a risky statement.

instead of thinking that we're living life on the ragged edge making "risky statements" lol...maybe you could consider that maybe what you think you know is all wrong?

rhadam
07-29-2016, 06:07 PM
No, I am no diabetic but it is known that high GI food will cause you a blood sugar spike and when that happens your insulin stores most of that as fat. It's the reason why most people on these forums say you should eat whole wheat rice instead of white rice. Correct me if I'm wrong.

You're wrong. Consider yourself corrected. And most people on this forum do not choose whole wheat over white because of GI impact. Lol.

Mrpb
07-29-2016, 11:27 PM
Well GI is what determines whether a carb is simple or complex.

Nope. The GI has nothing to do with it.

muruku
07-29-2016, 11:52 PM
Well GI is what determines whether a carb is simple or complex so saying that it doesn't matter is quite a risky statement.

No.

Simple carb = one or two sugars - mono or disaccharide
Complex carb = polysaccharides

lookingguy
07-30-2016, 04:47 PM
So according to you guys there is no such a thing as complex and simple carbs, great.

JustLost
07-30-2016, 05:09 PM
So according to you guys there is no such a thing as complex and simple carbs, great.

Read post #22 very carefully. Ask a librarian or a teacher to help if you need it.

lookingguy
07-30-2016, 06:06 PM
No.

Simple carb = one or two sugars - mono or disaccharide
Complex carb = polysaccharides
Then it is just a big coincidence that simple carbs have a higher GI than complex carbs.

mike33511
07-30-2016, 06:25 PM
Then it is just a big coincidence that simple carbs have a higher GI than complex carbs.

This is not necessarily the case. Potatoes, for example, have a very high GI and are a complex carb.

Mrpb
07-31-2016, 12:44 AM
Then it is just a big coincidence that simple carbs have a higher GI than complex carbs.

Many complex carbs have a higher GI than simple carbs.

muruku
07-31-2016, 01:10 AM
There several factors influencing the GI of a food such as its amylose content and how it is processed.

For example, using retrogradation (eg. putting bread in the freezer) reduces it's GI. Whereas reducing the particle size (eg. grounding or mashing) increases its GI.

lookingguy
07-31-2016, 10:44 AM
So even french baguettes are a complex carb now?

Mrpb
07-31-2016, 10:52 AM
So even french baguettes are a complex carb now?

Always have been.

And many websites don't get this but white bread and white rice are refined complex carbs.