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View Full Version : The Myth of the "Skills Gap"



Lightsout13
05-11-2016, 04:20 PM
http://www.economicpopulist.org/content/bernie-sanders-vs-hillary-clinton-h-1b-and-guestworker-visas-5940

In a nutshell: Judging by the past, Hillary Clinton, just like most Republicans, will most likely support importing more cheap labor to displace more American workers — and further depress domestic wages — with more guestworker visas. Whereas, Bernie Sanders would not.

[Editor's note: This is a post about the late Steve Jobs, President Obama, Hillary Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders — on H-1B guestworker visas — and about the tech industry and their false claim about a "skills gap" — and how more and more Americans are graduating from college, but still not finding work — and why we have depressed and stagnant wages — and what it all comes down to: Corporate greed and the politicians who support corporate greed. Read through all the links. For the most part, the Republicans aren't mentioned in this post because, generally speaking, most of them support bringing in more foreign guestworkers for lower wages to benefit big and powerful corporations — which is primarily the GOP's bread-and-butter. Earlier this month CISCO's Republican CEO and "Outsourcer-and-Chief" (who supports the TPP trade deal) endorsed Hillary Clinton for president.]




Business Insider (January 8, 2015) At a dinner meeting [fundraiser] with Obama, Steve Jobs told him there should be a program where foreigners who earned an engineering degree could be given a visa to stay in the US — when at that time Apple employed 700,000 factory workers in China, plus 30,000 engineers to support those workers.

Politifact: (November 22, 2011— which they rated Mostly True) Michele Bachmann said Steve Jobs told President Barack Obama that he had to move a great deal of his operation over to China because he couldn't find 30,000 engineers to be able to do the work that needed to be done. Steve Jobs stressed the need for more trained engineers and suggested that any foreign students who earned an engineering degree in the United States should be given a visa to stay in the country. Jobs said Apple had 700,000 factory workers employed in China, and that was because it needed 30,000 engineers on-site to support those workers. "You can't find that many in America to hire. These factory engineers did not have to be PhDs or geniuses; they simply needed to have basic engineering skills for manufacturing. Tech schools, community colleges, or trade schools could train them. If you could educate these engineers, we could move more manufacturing plants here.'"

Business Insider (October 24, 2011) When the Republicans were blocking the "Dream Act", Steve Jobs said it should be amended to give foreign engineering students visas to work in the United States. Jobs said the Obama administration was not business-friendly and said it was impossible to build a factory in the United States due to regulations and unnecessary costs. Apple had 700,000 factory workers employed in China, where it was much easier to build and run a factory. Jobs also said the American education system was "hopelessly antiquated" and crippled by teachers' unions. Apple's factories, for example, needed 30,000 skilled engineers — something the U.S. education system was not producing. He suggested the President completely overhaul the system and proposed an 11-month school year with days that lasted until 6 p.m. - - "You can't find that many in America to hire," he said. "If you could educate these engineers, we could move more manufacturing plants here."

Excerpts from The Nation: Why Skills Are Not Enough to Land a Job (by Michelle Chen on January 5, 2016)
A few years ago, politicians were decrying low graduation rates and high schools as “dropout factories” — pushing kids into lifetimes of poverty, joblessness and wasted potential. Now the curve has apparently shifted.


According to The New York Times, in light of rising graduation rates in recent years, education experts (presumably those same ones who previously worried about low high school completion rates) now worry this seemingly good news is actually meaningless, because diplomas are losing their “value.” So while graduation rates steadily tick up, should we suspect a shifting of the academic goal post?


Research cited by Achieve Inc — a think tank spearheaded by business leaders (including Exxon-Mobil, Intel Foundation, and JP Morgan Chase Foundation) shows they seem very alarmed by a lack of qualified job applicants. Many high school graduates start community college needing major remedial coursework, and may struggle to catch up to college-level academics.


But cynicism about lackluster diplomas may be misplaced, or more dangerously, distract the public from holding corporations and policymakers accountable for dismal job prospects. The worries about inadequate graduation standards echo the perennial warnings emanating from the corporate world about the so-called “skills gap,” which economist Paul Krugman calls a “zombie idea” frequently manipulated by business “opinion leaders” seeking to avoid blame for mass joblessness or low wages.


EPI’s latest analysis of workforce data, however, reverses the blame equation for young graduates by showing long-term barriers to secure employment that can’t be explained away by variations in academic rigor. Historically, the unemployment rate among younger workers (under age 25) has been more than double the general unemployment rate, reaching 12.3 percent versus 5.3 percent in early 2015. Moreover, long-term unemployment has consistently afflicted workers at all education levels, undercutting the notion that some magical pool of jobs is waiting to be claimed by those with just the right skill sets. (And thus makes it harder for employers to justify not offering decent wages and working conditions.)


EPI contends, the impoverishment of this generation “did not arise because young people today lack enough education or skills. Rather, it stems from weak demand for goods and services, which makes it unnecessary for employers to significantly ramp up hiring… not workers lacking the right skills or education.”


The perceived diploma crisis parallels the slippery rhetoric around the so-called “STEM crisis,” which corporate giants have portrayed as a systemic lack of qualified graduates to fill scientific and technical positions. Yet empirical analyses of STEM field job markets reveal distinctly little evidence of a widespread, systemic lack of graduates across the STEM fields. Perhaps an immediate “shortage” of software engineers might appear alongside a glut of chemistry PhDs, and plenty of science majors work outside their field. It certainly doesn’t mean science and tech are not important educational fields to develop. But these patterns do not point to a structural educational crisis.


Consider other deficits that high school graduates face in today’s economy: massive income inequality and stagnant wages, chronic financial crisis amid unsustainable housing costs and suffocating debts. And youth are graduating into a bleak gap in the quality of work, with a rise since the recession in relatively low-paying jobs without benefits.


EPI argues that a more effective, immediate way for policymakers to brighten the prospects of high school graduates would be driving meaningful public investment. This won’t solve the long-term problems facing high schoolers, but it can help stabilize young students and workers navigating an increasingly shaky economy.


[Editors' note: I mentioned a few of these points in my posts Unemployed Youth and College Grads drive decline in Labor Force and Debunking the STEM Crisis Myth. It should also be noted that Senator Bernie Sanders is a big fan of public investment — aka infrastructure spending. I also posted about the H-1B visa scam.]

EctoCanuck
05-11-2016, 04:43 PM
http://i.imgur.com/qMUF2Kd.png


Cliffs?

RougeProdigy
05-11-2016, 04:50 PM
http://i.imgur.com/qMUF2Kd.png


Cliffs?
Hillary is extremely qualified to be president.

Lightsout13
05-11-2016, 05:55 PM
http://i.imgur.com/qMUF2Kd.png


Cliffs?

Cliffs:

The idea of a skills gap is highly exaggerated
Hillary is an evil bitch
Big business wants for more immigrants to come to the US so they can be exploited for cheap labor
More screwing over of the American working class

MojoTheMonkey
05-11-2016, 06:11 PM
Cliffs:

The idea of a skills gap is highly exaggerated
Hillary is an evil bitch
Big business wants for more immigrants to come to the US so they can be exploited for cheap labor
More screwing over of the American working class

What's hilarious is for all the SJW crying about slavery almost all political parties still support a soft version of it.

Simply replace 'Mexicans do the jobs that American's won't do!' and 'We need more tech workers because we aren't producing any' (a huge lie) with 'We need slaves to pick the cotton or the south will be financially ruined!'.

Lightsout13
05-11-2016, 06:33 PM
What's hilarious is for all the SJW crying about slavery almost all political parties still support a soft version of it.

Simply replace 'Mexicans do the jobs that American's won't do!' and 'We need more tech workers because we aren't producing any' (a huge lie) with 'We need slaves to pick the cotton or the south will be financially ruined!'.

It's all about lower labor costs to try and maximize profits. They can pay immigrants subpar wages or outsource to some sweatshop somewhere overseas like in China then import it back to the US without paying tariffs so the goods become cheaper than if was produced in the US. If we brought back manufacturing and stopped with this free trade nonsense we would become a self-reliant nation again, more jobs that pay a living wage, domestically produced products become cheaper than Chinese knock off imports, etc. We've been getting screwed since the 70's and the massive gap of income inequality since the 70's shows that.

You'll hear people say how there's so many tech jobs and whatnot currently around but there's no one to fill them. What they're not telling you is that there are people to fill them, they just aren't cheap enough for employers to want them.

MagicMata
05-11-2016, 06:39 PM
There are 3 remaining options in this election as far as jobs go.

Hillary - Huge supporter of NAFTA and TPP, both of which she played a large role in pushing through
Trump - Huge exporter of jobs within his own company
Sanders - Huge vocal dissident of NAFTA and TPP from day 1, has protested against both in congress, the senate and in the streets

Lightsout13
05-11-2016, 06:45 PM
There are 3 remaining options in this election as far as jobs go.

Hillary - Huge supporter of NAFTA and TPP, both of which she played a large role in pushing through
Trump - Huge exporter of jobs within his own company
Sanders - Huge vocal dissident of NAFTA and TPP from day 1, has protested against both in congress, the senate and in the streets

I'm probably not even voting in this election since I don't really like any of the above. But Sanders makes some really good points and I'd rather have him be the Democratic nominee than Hillary but that's unlikely now because of the super delegates.

laser23
05-11-2016, 10:13 PM
Most corporations don't give a damn about their workers. Profit is king for most American companies and the american people are screwed in the process. Globalism= death of america