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View Full Version : 3 simple questions about a fat-loss diet



Liger97
10-11-2015, 12:44 PM
I'd like to get rid of the ''skinny-fat'' look and appear much more defined. I've already put on mass and all I really have to do is cut down, which I've got no problem with.

1. It's simply just eating less than I normally would have when I was putting on mass? For the most part I eat clean. (no pizza, soda, chips, candy bars)

2. Cardio: I know it's all diet for fat loss but I honestly love cardio, I try to train as smart as I can and do cardio on my non-lifting days (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday). I think cutting it down to only doing cardio after weights? (20-30 minutes)

3. Cheat meals: I usually pick out my cheat meals for Sunday. Usually these are supposed to be good right? Diet all week long, work hard and reward.

^ * I just sometimes feel regret when I have a cheat meal since I'm real focused on my health and fitness. But it's a day when I go out with my family or my girlfriend, and I don't want my fitness goals to seem like they're more important than they are. I usually chase the regret away thinking I work so hard that my body needs a break from it, just once at least.

Thanks in advance. :)

1JFS3
10-11-2015, 01:32 PM
I'd like to get rid of the ''skinny-fat'' look and appear much more defined. I've already put on mass and all I really have to do is cut down, which I've got no problem with.

1. It's simply just eating less than I normally would have when I was putting on mass? For the most part I eat clean. (no pizza, soda, chips, candy bars)

Assuming you are in a surplus now from your mass-gain phase, you will need to subtract ~300-500 calories (or more, depending on your intake,) daily, from what you are currently consuming to be at maintenance. Your weight will stabilize. From there, subtract another 300-500, daily, through diet and/or cardio, and continue this cycle as your weight stabilizes. Do not consume south of 2,000 calories.

2. Cardio: I know it's all diet for fat loss but I honestly love cardio, I try to train as smart as I can and do cardio on my non-lifting days (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday). I think cutting it down to only doing cardio after weights? (20-30 minutes)

As you said, you don't need cardio. If you want to do it, then I recommend post-training, or whenever you want to do it.

3. Cheat meals: I usually pick out my cheat meals for Sunday. Usually these are supposed to be good right? Diet all week long, work hard and reward.

No real need for a cheat; you can simply work the foods that you enjoy into your diet in moderation. If you do not track individual macros and want to utilize "cheat meals" then I would have them when you feel a higher level of depletion--essentially a refeed.

People will disagree, but in my honest opinion, practicing cheat meals to "reward for hard work" is not healthy (I don't mean in terms of weight loss or physical health; I mean mental.) Forget about everything for one day and just eat blindly? Maybe I have a skewed view of cheat meals, but I am an advocate for just having a slice or two of pizza 2 days a week as opposed to eating an entire pizza every Sunday.

^ * I just sometimes feel regret when I have a cheat meal since I'm real focused on my health and fitness. But it's a day when I go out with my family or my girlfriend, and I don't want my fitness goals to seem like they're more important than they are. I usually chase the regret away thinking I work so hard that my body needs a break from it, just once at least.

Case and point. You should not feel guilt man! Just don't binge eat. Consume foods in moderation and ENJOY YOURSELF. This is a poor relationship to have with food.

You're welcome :)

SuffolkPunch
10-11-2015, 02:24 PM
1. Less calories, yes. But maintain minimum levels of protein and dietary fat within a smaller calorie budget

2. Cardio is a time inefficient way to increase calorie burn. But the amount is depressingly small compared to how easily you can adjust calorie balance just by eating less.

3.Cheat meals are not smart, especially if you suspend calorie counting. I prefer to keep my calorie levels the same n average and work in 'treat' foods if I want them.

InItForFitness
10-11-2015, 02:46 PM
1. Less calories, yes. But maintain minimum levels of protein and dietary fat within a smaller calorie budget

2. Cardio is a time inefficient way to increase calorie burn. But the amount is depressingly small compared to how easily you can adjust calorie balance just by eating less.

3.Cheat meals are not smart, especially if you suspend calorie counting. I prefer to keep my calorie levels the same n average and work in 'treat' foods if I want them.

This'll do it ^^^


Side Note : Congrats on Green Title status, well deserved brotha. Nice to see solid posters getting the nod.