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OryxOryx
06-24-2015, 08:40 PM
Using the sticky thread, my BMR is about 1900. That means that depending on what activity factor I have, my TDEE is between about 2300 (sedentary) to 4200 (serious endurance athlete training).

I started at 255 (very little muscle... my upper body is like a pear filled with jello and two toothpicks sticking out for arms). Currently down to 225lbs. Doing AllPro and six 25min jumprope interval sessions per week (2 a day on the days I don't weight train, plus one total rest day per week).

Basically trying to transition to 175-185 with decent muscularity and reasonably low BF%.

What sort of impact on my transition efforts (muscle gain and fat loss) would I have if I upped my activity level significantly (say though long runs) so that I can eat more foods I love (most of which are junky... ice cream and other sugars, pizza, etc.)? If the deficit is the same, and assuming my minimum macros are being met or exceeded, would it matter if I'm eating a lot of calories at a very high activity level or lower calories with a lower activity level? Note that I'm not just concerned about weight loss here but also muscular gain.

I ask because I wuv junk food, and though I do take an occasional "cheat", it would be nice to eat it more often if it doesn't hamper my recomp efforts. And I shall never be satisfied by some cruel nonsense like a couple ounces of dark chocolate or a single slice of pizza... more like a pint of ice cream with half a jar of hot fudge on a large piece of cake, or 9-10 slices of pizza.

Thanks!

jonnicola
06-24-2015, 08:48 PM
If I was trying to cut 50lbs, I'd go for less activity and less calories.

OryxOryx
06-24-2015, 09:02 PM
If I was trying to cut 50lbs, I'd go for less activity and less calories.

Why? If the energy balance model is true for weight loss, then what difference would it make if its (x cals in - y cals out) versus ((x +1000) cals in - (y+1000) cals out)? And if muscle gain is about getting on a good weight lifting program and getting sufficient macros, then muscle gain shouldn't be impacted either, right?

jonnicola
06-24-2015, 09:44 PM
You'll find you overestimate how many calories exercise burns, especially since you have a lot to lose.

Just do a search for 'exercising more doesn't lead to weight loss'

ErikTheElectric
06-24-2015, 10:33 PM
And I shall never be satisfied by some cruel nonsense like a couple ounces of dark chocolate or a single slice of pizza... more like a pint of ice cream with half a jar of hot fudge on a large piece of cake, or 9-10 slices of pizza.

Thanks!

And this is something you should actively work on changing (if you want to succeed).

rhadam
06-24-2015, 10:56 PM
I ask because I wuv junk food, and though I do take an occasional "cheat", it would be nice to eat it more often if it doesn't hamper my recomp efforts. And I shall never be satisfied by some cruel nonsense like a couple ounces of dark chocolate or a single slice of pizza... more like a pint of ice cream with half a jar of hot fudge on a large piece of cake, or 9-10 slices of pizza.


Hope you enjoy being fat all your life with that mentality.

I love junk food more than probably anyone i know, yet i practice self-restraint.

OryxOryx
06-25-2015, 06:46 PM
@jonnicola: So are you disputing the activity factor involved in the Emma-Leigh sticky thread about calculating TDEE? Those figures suggest that activity level can cause your TDEE to be anywhere from 120% to 220% of your BMR, which is not a small impact.

If I have 1900cal BMR, then according to the Emma-Leigh thread my EDEE ranges from 2280cal to 4180cal depending on activity level, meaning there is potentially a 1900 cal/day difference depending on activity level.

What is wrong about those figures?

Okay, maybe the problem is people tend to want to like, go for a 20 minute jog and then decide that this has earned them the right to eat half a cake. But putting that aside, and supposing someone really was accurately tracking things, how would simultaneously upping activity level and calorie consumption impact body recomp?

@Erik, rhadam: The problem is that for me, zero pieces of pizza is far superior to one piece of pizza. In fact, I'd rather just eat zero junk food 13/14 days and then 1 day every two weeks binge for a single meal (not a whole day, just a meal). Anything wrong with that from a body recomp perspective?

ErikTheElectric
06-25-2015, 08:59 PM
@jonnicola: So are you disputing the activity factor involved in the Emma-Leigh sticky thread about calculating TDEE? Those figures suggest that activity level can cause your TDEE to be anywhere from 120% to 220% of your BMR, which is not a small impact.

If I have 1900cal BMR, then according to the Emma-Leigh thread my EDEE ranges from 2280cal to 4180cal depending on activity level, meaning there is potentially a 1900 cal/day difference depending on activity level.

What is wrong about those figures?

Okay, maybe the problem is people tend to want to like, go for a 20 minute jog and then decide that this has earned them the right to eat half a cake. But putting that aside, and supposing someone really was accurately tracking things, how would simultaneously upping activity level and calorie consumption impact body recomp?

@Erik, rhadam: The problem is that for me, zero pieces of pizza is far superior to one piece of pizza. In fact, I'd rather just eat zero junk food 13/14 days and then 1 day every two weeks binge for a single meal (not a whole day, just a meal). Anything wrong with that from a body recomp perspective?


No.. just from a psychological perspective..

jonnicola
06-26-2015, 12:17 AM
@jonnicola: So are you disputing the activity factor involved in the Emma-Leigh sticky thread about calculating TDEE? Those figures suggest that activity level can cause your TDEE to be anywhere from 120% to 220% of your BMR, which is not a small impact.




No.. just from a psychological perspective..

This ^

Mrpb
06-26-2015, 12:24 AM
Be careful with this tactic because long runs can easily interfer with your leg training and recovery.

Usually it's a better idea to focus all your energy on lifting as heavy as you can while restricting calories.

If you'd like to do cardio keep it low impact, not too long and try to keep it as far away from your leg training as possible.

Sephiroth66
06-26-2015, 09:56 AM
Hope you enjoy being fat all your life with that mentality.

I love junk food more than probably anyone i know, yet i practice self-restraint.

^This

It get's easier OP. If you're tracking your calories you'll eventually get tired of eating 5 cookies and having your daily calories burned up. I tried manipulating my calorie intake with extreme calorie cycling at one point just so I could eat ice cream and pizza. All it did was make me feel like hell for a day or two and regret ever doing it. Counting calories is my restraint. I would much rather have 4 meals of healthy filling food vs. 2 slices of pizza and pint of Ben and Jerry's.

OryxOryx
06-26-2015, 05:18 PM
No.. just from a psychological perspective..

For me, its psychologically more harmful (craving-inducing, etc.) to tease myself with just a little bit of junk food.

I don't find it particularly difficult to have zero junk food most days, then once every week or two have a single (big) junk food meal. I don't see anything harmful long-term about a pre-planned occasional binge.

@mrpb: Yeah, recovery was something I worried about. Right now with moderate cardio (25 minute moderate intensity jumprope interval sessions, twice a day, 3 days per week on non-weight-training days) I haven't had any issues with my legs. But I'm keeping an eye on it, particularly once I get far enough in AllPro so that my lifts are no longer pathetically light.

TravisSTraining
06-26-2015, 05:42 PM
I would focus on developing a healthy relationship with food before anything else

determined4000
06-26-2015, 06:09 PM
focus on changing your dietary habits which sound terrible
that will make things much more manageable long term
if you keep eating junk, you will be fighting an endless battle to keep weight off and probably be a yoyo dieter