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highiso
12-14-2014, 01:06 PM
Every year for the past 4.5 years I've bulked during the winter and always gained strength as a result of increased calories. However, cutting the fat each spring has always really been a drag; cutting 20-25 lbs. each year sucks, has gotten old and ultimately results in a loss of strength. Presently I'm 15 lbs. lighter than I was last year at this time.

Honestly at this point I'm a little burned out (I've worked out 5-6 days/week for almost 5 years now). Gains and physical changes now are almost unmeasurable year to year but I do believe I am making progress, albeit slow.

Since this summer I've changed up my plan after reaching an all-time low body weight of 185 lbs. (unless of course you count my HS graduating weight of 165 lbs.) Every exercise in my book is now being done in the 10-16 rep range. Am I crazy, making a mistake? What can I expect from this plan? I'm just going by feel, and I feel like this is what I need at this point, call it a year-long de-load I guess.

Thoughts, criticisms? Should I just take up Zoomba? :D

brava
12-14-2014, 01:23 PM
I'm working out in the 20-25 reps range, legs even higher, for the last 18 months or so.

Less problems with the joints, and looks like I'm packing up some muscle.

There are research studies saying that high reps are just as effective as low reps in building muscle mass, provided you go to failure with the high reps.

Regarding bulking/cutting, I don't like it as well. I try a small surplus and whenever I feel I put some fat, I give up the surplus for a couple of weeks.

LowDownNShifty
12-14-2014, 01:26 PM
Might work well for you OP, might not. A lot of lifting is just trial and error and finding what works best for YOU. All the best OP.

Brackneyc
12-14-2014, 01:26 PM
Every year for the past 4.5 years I've bulked during the winter and always gained strength as a result of increased calories. However, cutting the fat each spring has always really been a drag; cutting 20-25 lbs. each year sucks, has gotten old and ultimately results in a loss of strength. Presently I'm 15 lbs. lighter than I was last year at this time.

Honestly at this point I'm a little burned out (I've worked out 5-6 days/week for almost 5 years now). Gains and physical changes now are almost unmeasurable year to year but I do believe I am making progress, albeit slow.

Since this summer I've changed up my plan after reaching an all-time low body weight of 185 lbs. (unless of course you count my HS graduating weight of 165 lbs.) Every exercise in my book is now being done in the 10-16 rep range. Am I crazy, making a mistake? What can I expect from this plan? I'm just going by feel, and I feel like this is what I need at this point, call it a year-long de-load I guess.

Thoughts, criticisms? Should I just take up Zoomba? :D

I have made sweeping changes to my rep scheme as well. Anytime I have done it in the past, I have slowly gravitated back to the 5-6 range. Going to run this for 4 months (better of for worse), and see what happens. 4 months in the grand scheme of things is nothing, so I figured why not. Worst case, I don't make any significant gains, or I just end up hating it. Either way, at least I'll know.

induced_drag
12-14-2014, 01:57 PM
Why workout 5-6 days a week. My training is primarily strength based and I can only go 3-4 days a week. (and one of those is always a light day). If you really are training on progressive strength program, you wont have that frequency.

Why not try a real strength program and see how it goes? I know even doing 5/3/1 at 4 days a week burned me out after 4 months. (and I pretty much have as optimal a hormone profile as you can have)

Not saying that 10-16 wont do anything, but I believe natural guys need to work to get stronger. Tension based training is more important than pump training. There is a big difference between weight that 'feels' heavy because you do a lot of reps and weight that is truly heavy. It comes down to fiber recruitment.

If it were me, I would work to get stronger personally.....the mass (if you are eating properly) will come. If you just want to maintain, your program will probably work. You can actually do A LOT less and just maintain. As little as 1-2 sets weekly/bodypart has been shown to hold on to mass you have gained.

Plateauplower
12-14-2014, 03:29 PM
Different things work for different people. My dad got big working in higher rep ranges, I've never responded that well to it when I've tried it. I've read that if you have reached a stagnation point in growth with low rep strength based training, focusing on higher rep ranges for a while might be the best thing to coax out some more growth. That being said, I doubt you will add much additional growth at or below maintainance calories. I would think a very small surplus would be needed to see additional lean mass gains just because muscle is metabolically expensive tissue. I know it can be added even in a steep deficit for an untrained individual, but you are clearly well beyond that...If you have any joint pain, it might give you some recovery. I agree with the above though, weight training 5-6 days per week for the last 5 years would have burned me out, but there are a lot of variables there too...

kimm4
12-14-2014, 04:17 PM
Why the need to train 5-6 days a week? There are some great 4 day a week lifting programs.

Quality over quantity and doing more never means it's better. :)

EjnarKolinkar
12-14-2014, 04:22 PM
The Zoomba beats kayaking!

Type one fibers grow on reps they say. We arr all supposed to have a few pounds to get with the addituon of some higher reps work.

Why not just do PHUL and train 4 days a week for a year. Do both intensity and volume?

Building in a maintenece phase where you take a break and hold even is supposed to be good for longevity. Intentional plateau as opposed to breaking something, even if thats just the will to go on as hard.

IDK anything iso, just some random thoughts.

RobRocks
12-14-2014, 05:38 PM
I have just started doing high reps, 20-25 reps and I am enjoying my workouts again.it does take a lot of stress off your joints.

nod2014
12-14-2014, 06:16 PM
There is nothing wrong with working out 6 days a week, shorter training sessions.

SteveWright1
12-14-2014, 06:29 PM
Highiso
I do not know enough about body building or weight training to comment on the positives or negatives of 1 scheme over another

I do know a bit about being a person and from that perspective I can comment

4 years or so, doing 5 or 6 days per week can become fatiguing both physically and mentally, so mixing it up in order to refuel the motivation is a better option than continually pushing yourself on the same thing until you get so bored you just stop bothering

do you take regular deloads? if not maybe consider building them in

nothing is set in stone anyway, so you could trial the lower weight high reps scheme for a few weeks and see how that feels and asses the benefits or otherwise , if after trialing it, there is no reason you could not go back to low rep, heavy weight, and by that time you may feel more positive about it again

you could also consider a hybrid routine
if your training 6 days per week, and want to continue visiting the gym 6 times per week, maybe 3 days using High rep lower weight and 3 days using Heavy weight , low rep?

it is your training at the end of the day, and only you know what is best for you

Good luck with whatever you choose

snacker
12-14-2014, 06:49 PM
Why not mix it up? Do one week low and the next week high reps? I've burned a ton of fat and and gained a ton of muscle with this routine. I was fat and sloppy just over a year ago. Eat what your goal is.

The only thing it messes up is the one rep max on the app on my phone.

77Davis
12-14-2014, 08:37 PM
I'm not sure how to answer your questions without knowing really what you're goals are. When I was working out as a teenager, and a young adult, my goal was primarily strength gain. Later, when my goals shifted to being more toned was when a lot of frustration and hunger ensued. Some of this frustration came from trying the high rep routine. I felt like all I was doing was losing strength, losing muscle, and keeping the fat.

So I really don't think I got much benefit from high reps, but again it depends on how your body responds to this type of routine and how it works towards your goals.

Edman316
12-15-2014, 03:25 AM
Nothing wrong with training 5-6 days per week and going with a high rep plan.

You will never know if it will work without trying.

Everyone responds differently to exercise.

Personally, I think your new strategy is more healthy than adding 20-25 pounds of mostly fat in a short window only to turn around and try to lose it as quickly as possible.

highiso
12-15-2014, 07:27 AM
Thanks for the replies.

My goals are to build as much muscle naturally as possible while staying under 12% BF year round. I workout as much as I do because I like to eat. For those of you who know me, I've struggled with food. Taking a day off just means I have to eat less, I'd rather workout and be able to eat. Even though I say I'm feeling burned out I still enjoy going to the gym just about everyday or working out an extra day at home over the weekend. I don't think I'd be where I'm at working out only 3-4 days per week. I work each muscle group twice per week, fitting all of that into 3-4 days would be impossible, and I don't really buy into the whole "over training" thing, although I do believe your CNS can be heavily taxed by going to extremes without the proper rest.

I've never tried this high rep scheme, nor have I ever been this lean this late in the year. I'll stick with this for the next 2 months and reevaluate. It is a nice break not trying to add weight to the bar every few weeks. I'm still intense with my workouts and jump from set to set with little or no break, the lighter weight is definitely a welcome change.

PersonaNonGrata
12-15-2014, 08:00 AM
As someone who hasnt been above 10-11% body fat for about 3 years, my advice would be to watch out for too much volume/high rep stuff, especially on a deficit. Your strength can drop off a cliff if you don't do heavy low rep stuff as well.

ahawk01
12-15-2014, 08:08 AM
Different strokes... I like German volume training. 10X10 8x8 short rest periods can be used to recruit my fibers when body gets used to low rep programs

Casedogg43
12-15-2014, 09:12 AM
Might work well for you OP, might not. A lot of lifting is just trial and error and finding what works best for YOU. All the best OP.


^^^^^This is exactly what my thoughts are. ^^^^^^

I will add that, when you do switch over to a higher weight/lower rep workout, don't be surprised if your muscles are in heaven for a while and you feel a benefit. I really enjoy the high rep/medium weight workouts.
Was doing them for a couple months, then added in heavy lower rep exercises with the higher rep exercise and I responded well to that. To each his own.

I am not an old school bulker, and prefer to stay lean consistently. My choice, works for me.

bodyhard
12-15-2014, 09:50 AM
As long as you are improving with your goal then go for it.

I for one can not stay with the same routine month after month year after year. my success has come from consistently changing my routines.

Chowboy
12-15-2014, 05:04 PM
Different strokes... I like German volume training. 10X10 8x8 short rest periods can be used to recruit my fibers when body gets used to low rep programs

I tried some GVT once upon a time. Didn't get anything out of it except for a burning desire to avoid the gym...LOLs.

Like you said, horses for courses.

mcbourque
12-15-2014, 05:54 PM
The Zoomba beats kayaking!

Type one fibers grow on reps they say. We arr all supposed to have a few pounds to get with the addituon of some higher reps work.

Why not just do PHUL and train 4 days a week for a year. Do both intensity and volume?

Building in a maintenece phase where you take a break and hold even is supposed to be good for longevity. Intentional plateau as opposed to breaking something, even if thats just the will to go on as hard.

IDK anything iso, just some random thoughts.

I loved PHUL! I kinda want to run it again when I finish Strong Curve for my rehab. I don't know why but the two rep range of PHUL worked really well for me.

rspowers
12-16-2014, 06:20 AM
I ditched low reps about 10 years after several injuries from lifting and have not had a problem since. I had a good 6-7 year run of heavy lifting before my joints started to tell me that they had enough. You have a much less chance of injury with high reps and you can still bulk and increase strength. They key difference is that you might need to get more calories to bulk if you wanted but as you said you are trying to cut.

Recent research has shown that mass and strength gains are made from high or low reps - it really doesnt matter. Here is a sample study: http://www.trainingscience.net/?page_id=301. I honestly do not know why we still recommend low reps to people, especially beginners, as the chance of injury with low reps is so much higher. I always tell them to try low weights and high reps first to see how their body responds before getting into heavy weights.

to summarize all of the research:

"There have been multiple studies comparing changes in strength and size from different rep ranges and, despite what conventional wisdom teaches, these studies have consistently shown that higher reps cause increases in both strength and size. Yes, heavy weights and low reps increase strength and size the most. But that doesn’t mean higher reps don’t also build strength and size. Conventional wisdom has incorrectly interpreted the research as “heavy weights and low reps build strength; light weight and high reps build endurance”. The first lesson from the research is that “light weights and high reps do increase strength, just not as much as lower rep schemes.”"

StressMonkey
12-17-2014, 08:02 AM
My goals are to build as much muscle naturally as possible while staying under 12% BF year round. I workout as much as I do because I like to eat. For those of you who know me, I've struggled with food. Taking a day off just means I have to eat less, I'd rather workout and be able to eat. Even though I say I'm feeling burned out I still enjoy going to the gym just about everyday or working out an extra day at home over the weekend.

But do you get to eat like you want when you're dropping the 20-25 lbs each year? That and working out 5-6 times a week would burn me out for sure. It will be interesting to see how you respond to the changes. (BTW, I don't mean these comments in a negative way. Just random comments I thought. Your build is way better than mine and you obviously know what you're doing.)

highiso
12-17-2014, 09:06 AM
But do you get to eat like you want when you're dropping the 20-25 lbs each year? That and working out 5-6 times a week would burn me out for sure. It will be interesting to see how you respond to the changes. (BTW, I don't mean these comments in a negative way. Just random comments I thought. Your build is way better than mine and you obviously know what you're doing.)

I don't take that negatively at all. And Hell no, I DO NOT get to eat like I want when I'm dropping that much weight, lol! It takes the better part of 6 weeks for me to really get into the groove of cutting. Cutting the chocolate and sugar out of my diet is crazy TOUGH!!! A huge reason why I'm more into IIFYM now than I ever was. A little bit of chocolate every day is better than no chocolate for 3-4 months.

As of today I'm 12 lbs. lighter than I was on this day last year, that's a huge success for me!!! So my first attempt at staying leaner year round is working. It's all give and take. I really love my food and could still to this day, 5 years later, eat like I used to when i was 250 lbs. But, I've created somewhat of a habit that I'm able to stick to; Intermittent Fasting has really worked wonders for my food addiction. People think I'm nuts when I tell them I'm fasting 16-18 hours a day, but it just works and I would suggest it to anyone who deals with over eating.

Btw, the people who think I'm crazy and tell me I'm doing it all wrong, even after losing 60 lbs. and having kept it off for five years now are the same people who workout every day and can't lose 5 lbs. and keep it off. I actually know people who workout twice a day and never lose weight and their physique never improves. That **** right there is crazy if you ask me!

61customrebuild
12-17-2014, 09:57 AM
High reps can be effective if form is good. But typically high reps, especially with full range of motion, one's focus shifts to the movement count and not the feel of the muscles, whereby mechanical form deteriorates, ultimately leading to unbalanced stresses and pain issues. This is typically seen in crossfit. I think the better approach for high rep regiments would be narrow range (pump squeezing or quick bursts) movements where you focus in strictly on the feel of the muscles working in coordination. E.g., work pushups or dips just off the lowest position, not even half way up. Same for pullups, pull from lowest hang position to barely halfway up. Forget counting reps, that's distracts you. Instead get into a strong, nice feel movement, pump those muscles until you feel a burn, then stop. Weights aren't needed either, bodyweight works just as well if not better. But cannot neglect stretch tension work as well to complement and elongate muscles. You don't want just bulky short stiff muscles.

drudixon
12-17-2014, 05:25 PM
High reps can be effective if form is good. But typically high reps, especially with full range of motion, one's focus shifts to the movement count and not the feel of the muscles, whereby mechanical form deteriorates, ultimately leading to unbalanced stresses and pain issues. This is typically seen in crossfit. I think the better approach for high rep regiments would be narrow range (pump squeezing or quick bursts) movements where you focus in strictly on the feel of the muscles working in coordination. E.g., work pushups or dips just off the lowest position, not even half way up. Same for pullups, pull from lowest hang position to barely halfway up. Forget counting reps, that's distracts you. Instead get into a strong, nice feel movement, pump those muscles until you feel a burn, then stop. Weights aren't needed either, bodyweight works just as well if not better. But cannot neglect stretch tension work as well to complement and elongate muscles. You don't want just bulky short stiff muscles.

Don't mistake slow with time under tension. Fibers are constantly twitching, even if not contracting. Slow is one way, fast for the same time is another. The greater the load and or speed the more fiber types will be recruited.

SuperZar
12-17-2014, 06:21 PM
Recent research has shown that mass and strength gains are made from high or low reps - it really doesnt matter. Here is a sample study: http://www.trainingscience.net/?page_id=301. I honestly do not know why we still recommend low reps to people, especially beginners, as the chance of injury with low reps is so much higher. I always tell them to try low weights and high reps first to see how their body responds before getting into heavy weights.

An interesting read. Thanks. The lower rep scheme did produce 2x the mass/strength gain as the higher rep in the same amount of time however. the 36 reps in the study is rather high though. I'd think most would limit to 20-25 reps. Good to know some studies show impressive gains can still be has with higher reps ... even if they take longer to achieve. Although if it prevents injuries perhaps things even out :)

61customrebuild
12-17-2014, 06:43 PM
Don't mistake slow with time under tension. Fibers are constantly twitching, even if not contracting. Slow is one way, fast for the same time is another. The greater the load and or speed the more fiber types will be recruited.

Not sure we're talking about the same thing. Conventional science tells us there are three types of muscle fibers, those used for slow contractions (e.g., when running a mile); those used for fast contractions like sprinting, and the highly explosive glycol-reacting fibers that kick in only when (e.g.,) the stakes are high. Your regiment should focus on developing the fast contractions. Going over a minute in high intensity exercise probably starts to engage the slow ones that don't really need that work. When you get out of breath in the weight room, stop lifting! But the more explosive, powerful, faster twitch, you can achieve in the movement, the better for functional mechanics and strength. Slow pushing up 300 on the bench recruits the fast fibers. Holding yourself in a ring dip position recruits the fast fibers. Holding yourself in the ring dip position for 5 minutes shifts load to the slower ones. Catching yourself from a fall from the ring dip position recruits the glycol fibers whether you intend to or not.

PersonaNonGrata
12-18-2014, 02:40 AM
An interesting read. Thanks. The lower rep scheme did produce 2x the mass/strength gain as the higher rep in the same amount of time however. the 36 reps in the study is rather high though. I'd think most would limit to 20-25 reps. Good to know some studies show impressive gains can still be has with higher reps ... even if they take longer to achieve. Although if it prevents injuries perhaps things even out :)

I disagree with the premise that low reps/higher weight = increased risk of injury

Especially for us older folks, soft tissue injuries such as tendon and ligament problems are much more likely to be caused by "overuse" rather than "overload"

drudixon
12-18-2014, 04:30 AM
Not sure we're talking about the same thing. Conventional science tells us there are three types of muscle fibers, those used for slow contractions (e.g., when running a mile); those used for fast contractions like sprinting, and the highly explosive glycol-reacting fibers that kick in only when (e.g.,) the stakes are high. Your regiment should focus on developing the fast contractions. Going over a minute in high intensity exercise probably starts to engage the slow ones that don't really need that work. When you get out of breath in the weight room, stop lifting! But the more explosive, powerful, faster twitch, you can achieve in the movement, the better for functional mechanics and strength. Slow pushing up 300 on the bench recruits the fast fibers. Holding yourself in a ring dip position recruits the fast fibers. Holding yourself in the ring dip position for 5 minutes shifts load to the slower ones. Catching yourself from a fall from the ring dip position recruits the glycol fibers whether you intend to or not.

You've neglected to note the difference between 2a, 2b and 2x. Again, load dependent.

61customrebuild
12-18-2014, 07:35 AM
You've neglected to note the difference between 2a, 2b and 2x. Again, load dependent.

I guess the confusion may be you assume I don't understand time under tension. No, that's a particular focus of mine in that I do a lot of one arm hang training using wrist straps. Also gets you a KAATSU like effect due to the natural constriction resulting from the tension stretch/load. Of course, this regiment is not recognized in the industry yet. The industry also does not understand the need to be able to mentally (mind/body connection) shift loads around dynamically to ensure all fast fibers are getting the work they need. Instead the industry has you use one (habitually formed) set of fibers over and over until breakdown, whereby only those grow, and grow dysfunctionally due to scar tissue accumulation.

I also have a hypothesis that if you train correctly and consistently, you can convert some of your slow fibers into fast ones. I have no need for an endurance capability, such as for long distance running. I don't do what folks call cardio (which is actually pulmonary); when I get winded I stop. But in hang regiments, you don't get winded, although you get true cardio, as your heart rate goes way up. So in hanging for say couple minutes, one hard strapped to bar, might the body figure out a way to recruit more and more fibers to manage the resulting burn?

PersonaNonGrata
12-18-2014, 07:49 AM
I also have a hypothesis that if you train correctly and consistently, you can convert some of your slow fibers into fast ones.

That's hardly new... lots of studies out there on this subject

61customrebuild
12-18-2014, 04:49 PM
That's hardly new... lots of studies out there on this subject

Thanks, just read up on it.

Phattso
12-18-2014, 04:56 PM
Every year for the past 4.5 years I've bulked during the winter and always gained strength as a result of increased calories. However, cutting the fat each spring has always really been a drag; cutting 20-25 lbs. each year sucks, has gotten old and ultimately results in a loss of strength. Presently I'm 15 lbs. lighter than I was last year at this time.

Honestly at this point I'm a little burned out (I've worked out 5-6 days/week for almost 5 years now). Gains and physical changes now are almost unmeasurable year to year but I do believe I am making progress, albeit slow.

Since this summer I've changed up my plan after reaching an all-time low body weight of 185 lbs. (unless of course you count my HS graduating weight of 165 lbs.) Every exercise in my book is now being done in the 10-16 rep range. Am I crazy, making a mistake? What can I expect from this plan? I'm just going by feel, and I feel like this is what I need at this point, call it a year-long de-load I guess.

Thoughts, criticisms? Should I just take up Zoomba? :D

I think this is a great idea. For certain muscle groups like biceps and triceps for the last few weeks, I have been doing about 15 rep sets. When doing higher reps, it's easy to forget about form and just do the reps. You have to have the mid-muscle connection and make each rep count. That has been my experience.

I believe that you will see results.

Nightfly
12-18-2014, 05:14 PM
I saw a site that promoted super high reps. I mean like 50, take a break, bang out 50 more. No way you can tell me that someone who manages to do 100 squats with a decent weight does not have some great hormonal responses. I believe I read that there was a skier who did highrep squats and he had legs like Platz.

Brackneyc
12-18-2014, 05:42 PM
I saw a site that promoted super high reps. I mean like 50, take a break, bang out 50 more. No way you can tell me that someone who manages to do 100 squats with a decent weight does not have some great hormonal responses. I believe I read that there was a skier who did highrep squats and he had legs like Platz.

No one had legs like Platz, 'cept Platz.

drudixon
12-18-2014, 07:43 PM
I guess the confusion may be you assume I don't understand time under tension. No, that's a particular focus of mine in that I do a lot of one arm hang training using wrist straps. Also gets you a KAATSU like effect due to the natural constriction resulting from the tension stretch/load. Of course, this regiment is not recognized in the industry yet. The industry also does not understand the need to be able to mentally (mind/body connection) shift loads around dynamically to ensure all fast fibers are getting the work they need. Instead the industry has you use one (habitually formed) set of fibers over and over until breakdown, whereby only those grow, and grow dysfunctionally due to scar tissue accumulation.

I also have a hypothesis that if you train correctly and consistently, you can convert some of your slow fibers into fast ones. I have no need for an endurance capability, such as for long distance running. I don't do what folks call cardio (which is actually pulmonary); when I get winded I stop. But in hang regiments, you don't get winded, although you get true cardio, as your heart rate goes way up. So in hanging for say couple minutes, one hard strapped to bar, might the body figure out a way to recruit more and more fibers to manage the resulting burn?

Once you pass the lactic threshold you're wasting time. Different energy source, different adaptations. In fact, muscles will get smaller to increase surface area to volume ratio to increase lactic clearance. Stretch training also isn't new. It's a big part of mad dog, or whatever that's called. The idea being certain neurons only fire when stretch has occurred (to protect muscles from tearing) and thusly fire more motor units. As for dynamic rep and load ranges, phat, etc all cover that.

61customrebuild
12-19-2014, 07:35 AM
I saw a site that promoted super high reps. I mean like 50, take a break, bang out 50 more. No way you can tell me that someone who manages to do 100 squats with a decent weight does not have some great hormonal responses. I believe I read that there was a skier who did highrep squats and he had legs like Platz.

There's more than one way to work squats. Heavy squats through your main power path is one way, typical for most, but not for me. I get excellent results from just bodyweight or a bit more, using a lot of hip dynamics, sort of like dancing in the low squat position where load constantly shifts from side to side. Try that for a minute or two or until the burn sets in, shake out, repeat. Feels great, never any post-WO issues.

61customrebuild
12-19-2014, 07:55 AM
Once you pass the lactic threshold you're wasting time. Different energy source, different adaptations. In fact, muscles will get smaller to increase surface area to volume ratio to increase lactic clearance. Stretch training also isn't new. It's a big part of mad dog, or whatever that's called. The idea being certain neurons only fire when stretch has occurred (to protect muscles from tearing) and thusly fire more motor units. As for dynamic rep and load ranges, phat, etc all cover that.

Agreed. My slogan is (when there is somebody else there), when you feel the burn, it's my turn. You want to stop at a feeling, not at a count. Working beyond that point (as in no-pain, no-gain) is intentional damage. Sure that might add size, with blocky inter-muscular scar tissue (that is not as strong as normal healthy muscle), if that is your goal. But working to burn in hang regiments works to gradually extend time to the burn point. So something good is happening.

But the existing "science" is conceptually limited, contradictory, always changing. Problem is the pursuit is better approached as an ART (a personal philosophy that manifests itself in level progressions of physical form, self-awareness, and body-mechanical performance). While there is value in the body of information that is out there, the more serious study is internal IMO.

tomrose9
12-20-2014, 03:23 AM
I like high reps better than low reps for the very reason that it's less strength on the joints. My muscles have responded a lot better to this type of training with isolation work as it forces me to do a full rep and squeeze the muscle at the correct point. I do lower reps with heavier weight on Squats and Deadlifts though... I guess that's what my body responds to!