PDA

View Full Version : Can being stronger lead to throwing harder? srs



knicksbrah
10-24-2014, 06:11 PM
Ok In HS when I played CF I got compared to Johnny Damon for my awful arm. Granted, I had terrible form but still.


Now, I am throwing hoses from the OF and everyone is in shock that knew me years back throwing lol.

I've been lifting the past 2 years Can anyone confirm that my arm strength leads to more velocity on my throw?


That dude Chris Sale has skeleton arms and throws 97 so im confused

http://espn.go.com/photo/2012/0528/mlb_g_saler_cr_600.jpg

Impurityz
10-24-2014, 06:13 PM
I don't think it really matters that much.....srs

mexanacho
10-24-2014, 06:15 PM
no relation, you probably just matured some since high school so you naturally throw harder now.


I have noticed that people with longer arms tend to throw harder tho

2am
10-24-2014, 06:17 PM
To an extent, arm strength will increase your throwing capability however a big part of this skill comes from natural throwing ability (technique etc), the type of muscle fibres they have developed (eg sprinters have fast response muscle
Fibres, inb4 bro science ) and how long you have been training for throwing x object.

A person that has been trained to throw say a tennis ball all their life will out jelq a bodybuilder/power lifter who has never thrown a ball.

knicksbrah
10-24-2014, 06:20 PM
no relation, you probably just matured some since high school so you naturally throw harder now.


I have noticed that people with longer arms tend to throw harder thomanlets unite :(

89FoxBody
10-24-2014, 07:21 PM
Velocity is more about elasticity in your muscles and tendons/ligaments than muscular strength. The guys who throw the hardest are always the lanky guys with long ass arms.

amikaelmorris
10-24-2014, 07:56 PM
it's part of it but not the whole

stride length and hip/shoulder rotation and all that contributes to velocity as much, if not more than arm strength

i guess the comparison is like cracking a whip or throwing a punch, arm punches are weak punches

TheMarshall
10-24-2014, 08:38 PM
It will have a greater effect off the mound because you can actually push off with your legs whereas in the outfield you can push off the same. I've been told by a lot of coaches that your abs and back are the biggest part of throwing hard for some reason.

knicksbrah
10-25-2014, 07:28 AM
It will have a greater effect off the mound because you can actually push off with your legs whereas in the outfield you can push off the same. I've been told by a lot of coaches that your abs and back are the biggest part of throwing hard for some reason.well there ya go. back grew 2x the size it was

maybe thats it

BatteryBro42
10-25-2014, 09:58 AM
Played college baseball at a pretty high level. As somebody who lived in the gym during my college career I can tell you it has its effects. For one you will throw harder because of your leg drive. Lifting will streghten certain muscles like your rotator cuff allowing you to generate more torque.

However guys who throw in the mid to upper 90s are either 6"4-6"5 and can generate a lot of momentum. Or they are extremely flexible. Pedro Martinez for instance could touch the back of his hand to his forarm. Lifting will eventually make your arm suffer. You will get tight and lose the elasticity in your arm.

Guys at the pro level may not look huge but train the "throwing muscles" almost daily.

Elite guys are born with it, there is no developing that talent. Lifting will get you to a certain point, being in shape will get you to a certain point, but beyond that it goes on to god gifted ability. Either your arm is live or it isn't.

Baseball is a weird sport I saw guys completely out of shape, play at a much higher level than me. I was the strongest gym guy in my program, but that didn't translate to me having the most power, or strongest arm.

BusterHymen69
10-25-2014, 01:26 PM
Idk. Id imagine some little leaguers could throw a baseball faster than some dudes in the nfl

doingwork30
10-25-2014, 01:42 PM
why do pitchers benefit from steroids?

must be because it helps their flexibility and fiber type distribution

PunyFella
10-25-2014, 01:58 PM
Played college baseball at a pretty high level. As somebody who lived in the gym during my college career I can tell you it has its effects. For one you will throw harder because of your leg drive. Lifting will streghten certain muscles like your rotator cuff allowing you to generate more torque.

However guys who throw in the mid to upper 90s are either 6"4-6"5 and can generate a lot of momentum. Or they are extremely flexible. Pedro Martinez for instance could touch the back of his hand to his forarm. Lifting will eventually make your arm suffer. You will get tight and lose the elasticity in your arm.

Guys at the pro level may not look huge but train the "throwing muscles" almost daily.

Elite guys are born with it, there is no developing that talent. Lifting will get you to a certain point, being in shape will get you to a certain point, but beyond that it goes on to god gifted ability. Either your arm is live or it isn't.

Baseball is a weird sport I saw guys completely out of shape, play at a much higher level than me. I was the strongest gym guy in my program, but that didn't translate to me having the most power, or strongest arm.This. Lifting eventually caught up to me, and I lost a ton of flexibility and fukked up my elbow. And I know plenty of others guys who injured themselves because of lifting heavy while not maintaining proper mobility and flexibility to throw.

BatteryBro42
10-25-2014, 03:41 PM
why do pitchers benefit from steroids?

must be because it helps their flexibility and fiber type distribution

Roids are going to help increase stregth in the muscles being trained. So if your throwing, doing long toss, getting your pitching exercises in everyday, your going to see gains.

That being said know plenty of guys who ****ed up their careers by teching. Tech will not stregthen tendons and ligaments. So your seeing muscles perform at levels the tendons and ligaments can't keep up with. This is a reason I believe we see so many tommy john surgeries in the league these days.

Baseball is a very weird sport, you either have it or you don't. Plenty of Ball players out there bigger and stronger than pros who never made it. It's truely a skille sport, and something you have to develop every day every practice from little league on up. Often times it doesn't come down to athletic tools, or phisical prowress but little things much harder to quantify than benches and 40 times

BatteryBro42
10-25-2014, 03:49 PM
This. Lifting eventually caught up to me, and I lost a ton of flexibility and fukked up my elbow. And I know plenty of others guys who injured themselves because of lifting heavy while not maintaining proper mobility and flexibility to throw.

Sorry about that brah. If I could go back and do things differently in my career it would have been to put more time into stretching and flexibility. Also guys if your still balling, in highschool or wherever you are stretch 24/7. Become flexible as ****. Lifting is great, but flexibility is where its at.

During my playing days is was 6 foot 230. Was a big dude, now I sit at about 185, and stretch daily. Down about 45 lbs I have more power and explosiveness than I ever did. It's all do to my flexibility. I couldn't even touch my toes in college, now I put my palms on the ground. I throw harder, run faster, and hit with more power than I ever did being bulky and "strong". Weight room is great but you want to get to the next level get your core right and your flexibility on point

ballzofpeaze
10-25-2014, 04:12 PM
You should be able to get stronger for throwing by increasing force through hip extension/quicker shoulder rotation.

E.g. I've seen golfers do med ball throws against the wall with that hip rotation/acceleration/extension in order to create a more powerful swing. Something similar should help for throwing.

Increasing your bench/deadlift/squat doesnt have a direct link to sport specific functional strength. It's a great foundation, but other movements are required in training.