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nostruggle
09-24-2014, 04:12 PM
When I eat dinner, like for today example I'll have: 2 1/2 cups of tossed salad, 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes, and a chicken thigh & leg. I'll eat that, still feel hungry so I'll go on to eat a 4 oz chicken breast. Is this normal or am I overeating and should just find a way to suppress my hunger?

InItForFitness
09-24-2014, 04:15 PM
It depends on what your overall intake looks like.
Are you meeting daily dietary requirements? Do you have room to eat more?

AFC96
09-24-2014, 04:20 PM
If your breakfast was a glass of milk and for lunch you had a few broccoli, then you should not be full after dinner.

What is your calorie intake?

nostruggle
09-24-2014, 04:21 PM
It depends on what your overall intake looks like.
Are you meeting daily dietary requirements? Do you have room to eat more?

I'm 5'11 143lbs at around 10-12bf% I'm currently trying to eat 1800kcals. The only thing is I'll eat some skittles (1/4 cup) and a pack of thinsations throughout the day, and sometimes I can't count the calories in my food at school because it is bought.

e.g. a 4 oz chicken breast sandwich w/ cheese, lettuce, onion, pickles, tomatoes, cucumbers

and I'll end up feeling guilty or paranoid that I'm overeating even though I want to eat still.

nostruggle
09-24-2014, 04:22 PM
If your breakfast was a glass of milk and for lunch you had a few broccoli, then you should not be full after dinner.

What is your calorie intake?

Previous post I got into more detail

InItForFitness
09-24-2014, 04:26 PM
I'm 5'11 143lbs at around 10-12bf% I'm currently trying to eat 1800kcals. The only thing is I'll eat some skittles (1/4 cup) and a pack of thinsations throughout the day, and sometimes I can't count the calories in my food at school because it is bought.

e.g. a 4 oz chicken breast sandwich w/ cheese, lettuce, onion, pickles, tomatoes, cucumbers

and I'll end up feeling guilty or paranoid that I'm overeating even though I want to eat still.

Sounds like you have a seriously unhealthy relationship/mindset of food, you need to re-evaluate the way you think about food and your diet.

Additionally it sounds like you're drastically under-eating.



Have you been diagnosed with, or considered the potential of possibly suffering from an eating disorder?
You may want to consider this and have an evaluation done with a medical professional.

nostruggle
09-24-2014, 04:27 PM
my food today


FOODS Calories Carbs Fat Protein Cholest Sodium Sugars Fiber
Breakfast
Generic - Egg White (Fried), 1 large egg 70 0g 0g 4g 0mg 55mg 0g 0g
Country Harvest - 100 % Whole Wheat Stone Milled Bread, 1 slice 110 19g 2g 5g 0mg 160mg 2g 3g
Jamaican - Calaloo & Saltfish, 1/4 cup cooked (1 cup raw) 64 0g 0g 0g 0mg 0mg 0g 0g
Lunch
Generic - Chicken Breast Sandwich on Whole Grain Sandwich Thin, 1 Sandwich 280 23g 7g 36g 90mg 530mg 0g 0g
Dinner
Homemade - Oven Roasted Chicken Leg Quarter With Skin, 1 leg quarter 260 0g 12g 20g 0mg 0mg 0g 0g
Homemade - Homemade Mashed Potato ,milk & Butter, 1/2 cup 119 18g 4g 2g 0mg 0mg 0g 0g
Generic - Tossed Salad (No Dressing), 1.5 cups 33 7g 0g 3g 0mg 54mg 0g 1g
Iga - Chicken Breast - Chicken Breast, 4 oz 124 0g 2g 26g 64mg 72mg 0g 0g
Snacks
Bulk Barn - Chocolate Covered Almonds, 7 Almond 140 14g 9g 21g 14mg 9mg 12g 1g
Christie - Thinsations Oreo, 1 package (23g) 100 19g 2g 1g 0mg 150mg 8g 0g
Skittles - Dark Side (Large Bag), 1.4 oz (40 g) 160 37g 2g 0g 0mg 10mg 29g 0g
TOTAL: 1,460 137g 40g 118g 168mg 1,040mg 51g 5g

nostruggle
09-24-2014, 04:29 PM
Sounds like you have a seriously unhealthy relationship/mindset of food, you need to re-evaluate the way you think about food and your diet.

Additionally it sounds like you're drastically under-eating.



Have you been diagnosed with, or considered the potential of possibly suffering from an eating disorder?
You may want to consider this and have an evaluation done with a medical professional.

No I haven't. My issue is that I receive a lot of different information on the same topics that contradict each other. So I end up seriously confused if I'm on the right track for gaining muscle mass or not.

InItForFitness
09-24-2014, 04:32 PM
No I haven't. My issue is that I receive a lot of different information on the same topics that contradict each other. So I end up seriously confused if I'm on the right track for gaining muscle mass or not.

Your statement of 'I'll end up feeling guilty or paranoid that I'm overeating even though I want to eat still.' creates an impression of a very unhealthy mindset in regards to food and your diet.


There is no reason to ever feel "guilty" about eating something you like or letting yourself eat if you're hungry.
Often if you're hungry it's because you're not eating enough.

Of course there is a difference between being truly hungry, and being bored...too many people mistake the 2nd for the 1st.




If you're really looking to start learning about the bulking process, please take some time to read through this thread/write-up I did on the subject ; http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=163115561

Most of the answers you're looking for should be provided through the thread itself and the various links I provide.



Any other questions, feel free to post them in the thread and they will be answered.

seanfinn01
09-24-2014, 04:35 PM
No I haven't. My issue is that I receive a lot of different information on the same topics that contradict each other. So I end up seriously confused if I'm on the right track for gaining muscle mass or not.

For a start 1400 cals is not building anything, period. It does sound like you need to re-evaluate your relationship with food, especially if you want to gain weight.

Gxp23
09-24-2014, 04:36 PM
I'm 5'11 143lbs at around 10-12bf% I'm currently trying to eat 1800kcals. The only thing is I'll eat some skittles (1/4 cup) and a pack of thinsations throughout the day, and sometimes I can't count the calories in my food at school because it is bought.

e.g. a 4 oz chicken breast sandwich w/ cheese, lettuce, onion, pickles, tomatoes, cucumbers

and I'll end up feeling guilty or paranoid that I'm overeating even though I want to eat still.


No I haven't. My issue is that I receive a lot of different information on the same topics that contradict each other. So I end up seriously confused if I'm on the right track for gaining muscle mass or not.

You would do well to take a read of the stickie threads available to you in this section of the forum.
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=156380183

Start with that ^

Vagus01
09-24-2014, 04:51 PM
No I haven't. My issue is that I receive a lot of different information on the same topics that contradict each other. So I end up seriously confused if I'm on the right track for gaining muscle mass or not.

1400 calories is what i eat for breakfast. 1400 calories is what they eat when the world has ended and they just want to keep breathing long enough to be cannibalized by the guy on the 2500 calorie/day diet.

Eat more, lift, and don't bury yourself in the day to day details of your body's morphology. Chart something out long term and get to the end of it. Then reevaluate and make a new plan. Most of the mass media dietary information is aimed at a bunch of plants that spend their days uncontrollably soaking up sugar. That's not you.

Mrpb
09-24-2014, 10:27 PM
nostrugle: calculate your TDEE as explained here below and follow the rest of the advice.

To answer your question: you should feel satisfied after your meals. If not, you're eating not enough calories, protein and/or fibre.



COMPOSING A RATIONAL DIET

Advice on diet and nutrition is often based on myths and, even more so, on the marketing message of supplement companies and self-proclaimed diet gurus with agendas contrary to your interests. Please don't allow yourself, your health, your fitness goals or your wallet to be compromised by the prevalent misinformation. Learn the basics of nutrition and start engaging in healthy, rational dietary habits that can last a lifetime.

The first step is to discard biased advice on nutrition and diet, and, in its place, embrace simple logic:



Compose a diet that ensures micronutrient and macronutrient sufficiency, derived predominantly from whole and minimally processed foods if possible, with remaining caloric intake being largely discretionary within the bounds of common sense.




Caloric Intake

Energy balance is the primary dietary driver of body weight and it also impacts body composition. A chronic surplus of calories will result in increased body weight and a chronic deficit of calories will result in a loss of body weight.

In other words, in order to gain about one pound of tissue weight (as opposed to transient flux in water weight), you need to consume a total of about 3,500 calories more than you expend. And to lose about one pound of tissue weight, you have to do the opposite -- consume about 3,500 calories less than you expend.

Thus, the first step in constructing any rational diet is to get a sense of how many calories per day, on average, you should consume in order to progress towards your goals.

The average number of calories you expend per day -- called total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) -- is a function of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and your average weekly activity level.

To estimate your BMR, it's important to have a sense of how much lean body mass (LBM) you carry. If you're not sure, post a photo or two and we can estimate your percentage body fat and, from this number and your total body weight, it's easy to estimate LBM by using the following formula:



LBM = body weight * (1 - percentage body fat)


To estimate BMR, use the the Katch-McArdle formula:



BMR = 370 + (9.8 * LBM in pounds)
or
BMR = 370 + (21.6 * LBM in kg)


The next step is to estimate average weekly activity using the following guidelines to calculate an activity factor (AF):




• 1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

• 1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

• 1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

• 1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

• 1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.


Macronutrient Intake

Ensure that your intake of macronutrients meets sufficiency (as defined below), with remaining macronutrient composition of the diet being largely a function of personal preference.

Ideally, ensure macronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.



Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)



Micronutrient Intake

Take care and use good judgement in food selection and portioning to ensure that micronutrient sufficiency is reached without excessive intake from dietary sources and/or supplements.

As with macronutrient sufficiency, one should ensure micronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.

To get a good sense of recommended intake of vitamins and minerals, please review this (http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary-guidance/dietary-reference-intakes/dri-tables) USDA guidelines webpage.

You'll find the following information particularly helpful:




Intakes: Recommended Intakes for Individuals (http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/5_Summary%20Table%20Tables%201-4.pdf)

RDA and Adequate Intake for Vitamins and Elements (http://iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/RDA%20and%20AIs_Vitamin%20and%20Elements.pdf)

Upper Limit for Vitamins and Elements (http://iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/ULs%20for%20Vitamins%20and%20Elements.pdf)

Electrolytes and Water (http://www.iom.edu/Global/News%20Announcements/~/media/442A08B899F44DF9AAD083D86164C75B.ashx)




Meal Timing, Composition & Frequency

The number of meals you consume, the timing of those meals and the macro/micronutrient composition of each meal is largely a function of personal preference.

While it might be "optimal" to consume more than one meal per day and less than 5 meals per day, the simple truth is that any difference that directly results from such fine tuning is likely too small to notice even after years of training.

Thus, base your meal timing, composition and frequency on your subjective preference such as to optimize your sense of energy, performance, satiety, palatability, convenience, social/business life and sustainability.

Do not hesitate to very all three factors from day to day as circumstance dictates. In other words, do not become a slave to routine, with inflexibility compromising your quality of life.


Pre & Post Workout Nutrition

What (if anything) you consume before and after your workout does not play a significant direct role in the outcome of your diet, beyond personal preference.

Why? Because what matters in terms of direct impact on outcomes is total daily intake of all nutrients.

Thus, you should optimize based on how you respond to training in a fed or fasted state, and based on your hungry after exercise. In other words, use common sense.


Supplements

Supplements are just that, products that are intended to supplement deficiencies in your diet. If your diet is properly composed then there's no need or unique benefit to using supplements.

If your diet isn't properly composed and, thus, you have deficiencies, try to fix your diet to cure such deficiencies though the consumption of whole and minimally processed foods. If you can't fix your diet, then use the lowest dose supplement(a) needed to cure any remaining deficiencies.

determined4000
09-24-2014, 10:36 PM
you are hungry because you are eating far too little and dozens of lbs underweight
You should be eating 2x that

bartolomei
09-24-2014, 11:47 PM
I'm 5'11 143lbs at around 10-12bf% I'm currently trying to eat 1800kcals.

Using this random calorie calculator
mayoclinic.org/calorie-calculator/itt-20084939

a man, 20 years, 5 foot and 11 inch, 143 lbs, with an "active" life style needs 2,500 Calories per day, and if you choose "very active" it is 2,900 Calories. I'm not saying this is the exact amount you need, but by taking 1,800 Calories you would probably lose weight and of course be hungry.

Next, this random height/weight chart
healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm

says that normal weight for a 5 feet 11 inch man with a small frame is 146-157 lbs, and for a medium frame is 154-166 lbs. "Frame" basically depends on the thickness of your bones. If you have thin bones, you have small frame. If you can wrap your wrist with a thumb and middle finger and your can easily join the fingertips, you likely have small frame.

If you have 143 lbs, you are underweight.

But please, do not start to eat just to meet some "healthy weight" criteria. Try to eat the way you will feel right and you will achieve the goal you have.