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treefiddy1031
09-09-2014, 05:39 AM
So I'm getting pretty close to my weight goal, maybe 6-11 pounds to go. I've been cutting for about a year (240 - 157) but I wasn't on a tested, proven lifting routine until about a month ago (started doing SL in a 3x5 format). Fast forward a few weeks, and I've developed full-blown plantar fasciitis in both feet, presumably from all the squats/deadlifts. I've been out of the gym for a little over two weeks at this point, and the podiatrist told me to buy a specific brand/type of shoe insert, which I did. It helps a little, but my PF hasn't cleared up. I did dial back my calorie intake a bit to account for the reduction in exercise. The thing is, for the 2+ weeks that I've been out of the gym, my weight has steadily been dropping at a rate much faster than it was while I was lifting. How concerned should I be that I'm losing what little muscle I have left? I'm relatively sedentary for the time being, trying to get this PF to heal up because I've got some travel coming up and want to be able to get around pain-free - don't want to risk making it worse by diving back into the gym. Just looking for any comments on muscle loss potential, or maybe exercises or cardio I could do that won't make my PF worse. In the absence of the gym, currently eating around 1400-1500 calories (500 deficit).

Znik
09-09-2014, 06:11 AM
Any reason you can't go to the gym with plantar fasciitis ? If you just avoid standing (heel) exercises you can still do tons of lifting.

The reason weight is dropping faster is most likely due to water loss, less cortisol from not lifting (physical stress), less inflammation, possible glycogen/water reduction etc. etc.

treefiddy1031
09-09-2014, 06:37 AM
Any reason you can't go to the gym with plantar fasciitis ? If you just avoid standing (heel) exercises you can still do tons of lifting.

The reason weight is dropping faster is most likely due to water loss, less cortisol from not lifting (physical stress), less inflammation, possible glycogen/water reduction etc. etc.

No, I guess there's not really much reason that I can't go to the gym at all. Doctor told me to lay off all lower body lifts, not just ones that are load-bearing on the foot. He said this is because PF can be secondary to hamstring/calf issues, and working those may exacerbate the PF problem (which I don't want to do due to looming vacation, need to be able to get around). I guess I felt that if I'm going to be stuck half-assing with no real compound lifts, lower body work, or cardio, I might as well just take the time off to recover properly. But any amount of lifting is better than none, right?

Znik
09-09-2014, 07:28 AM
No, I guess there's not really much reason that I can't go to the gym at all. Doctor told me to lay off all lower body lifts, not just ones that are load-bearing on the foot. He said this is because PF can be secondary to hamstring/calf issues, and working those may exacerbate the PF problem (which I don't want to do due to looming vacation, need to be able to get around). I guess I felt that if I'm going to be stuck half-assing with no real compound lifts, lower body work, or cardio, I might as well just take the time off to recover properly. But any amount of lifting is better than none, right?

I thought that calf exercises were encourage during PF to strengthen the heel/stability/posture/load bearing along with calf stretching/mobility work ? But then again I am no doctor.

As for lifting, you can still do most compounds sitting, deadlifts can be done sitting, rows can be done lying face down on a bench, overhead press, benching etc. Leg work is of course pretty much non-existent if you are not allowed to use em at all.

Just look up some wheelchair bodybuilders/lifters, they pretty much get all bases covered (apart from legs obviously).

DarthInvadeHer
09-09-2014, 10:15 AM
ive had pf for over a year now, stop being a puss.

lee__d
09-09-2014, 10:32 AM
I'd just go in and do what you can. Well, I'd actually go get a cortisone shot, personally.

Serpentarius
09-09-2014, 10:45 AM
ive had pf for over a year now, stop being a puss.

Pretty much..

sedentary people get this, just goes to prove its NOT from lifting.

Squats and deadlifts DID NOT do this to you, you probably heel strike when you walk or move faster and have poor posture/flat feet. I have it on my right foot, WITH a fractured toe, patella femoral syndrome, a shoulder that subluxes, and im ugly....and i still dont make excuses not to lift and sprint with competitive times.

treefiddy1031
09-09-2014, 11:11 AM
Contraindicated for steroids unfortunately, so cortisone is out. I do have flat feet - I also wear shoes that address my overpronation. Seems odd that I could run 15ish miles a week at 220+ pounds for months on end and be fine, but within a month of increasing my lifting frequency I have PF in both feet. It's hard to NOT attribute it to the lifting. Regardless, my question was more geared toward the potential of muscle loss if I'm sedentary for a month or so.

steveh5200
09-09-2014, 07:04 PM
Look for "rocker shoes" 15 degree. It is the miracle cure for PF. And what did you do to correct pronation?


Contraindicated for steroids unfortunately, so cortisone is out. I do have flat feet - I also wear shoes that address my overpronation. Seems odd that I could run 15ish miles a week at 220+ pounds for months on end and be fine, but within a month of increasing my lifting frequency I have PF in both feet. It's hard to NOT attribute it to the lifting. Regardless, my question was more geared toward the potential of muscle loss if I'm sedentary for a month or so.