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markmoelen
09-02-2014, 05:45 AM
Keeping in mind I'm on a deficit diet plan, almost there weightwise just need to trim the remaining love handles.

Also hitting the gym 5/week.

My proein intake (natural + shakes) is about x1.5 my body weight.

What should my carbs intake be if I still want to trim the fat down but NOT burn muscles? (I have excluded carbs post workout in the evening)

Anthony21
09-02-2014, 05:48 AM
Keeping in mind I'm on a deficit diet plan, almost there weightwise just need to trim the remaining love handles.

Also hitting the gym 5/week.

My proein intake (natural + shakes) is about x1.5 my body weight.

What should my carbs intake be if I still want to trim the fat down but NOT burn muscles? (I have excluded carbs post workout in the evening)

Read the stickies in this section and that should answer your question.

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 05:50 AM
I suggest you read the stickies. x1.5 of protein is a bit much.

Carbs won't prevent you from losing weight.

WonderPug
09-02-2014, 05:50 AM
Macronutrient Intake

Ensure that your intake of macronutrients meets sufficiency (as defined below), with remaining macronutrient composition of the diet being largely a function of personal preference.

Ideally, ensure macronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.



Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 06:05 AM
I suggest you read the stickies. x1.5 of protein is a bit much.

Carbs won't prevent you from losing weight.

That's what the sticky mentions:
Researchers also acknowledge that protein becomes MORE important in the context of LOWER calorie intakes, or LOWER carb intakes.
Recent evidence also suggests that protein intakes of 2.2-3g/kg in lean athletes help with LEAN MASS RETENTION, and the physiological and psychological stressors associated with high volume or intense training.


Regarding carbs, I want to loose a bit of weight not muscles.

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 06:15 AM
That's what the sticky mentions:
Researchers also acknowledge that protein becomes MORE important in the context of LOWER calorie intakes, or LOWER carb intakes.
Recent evidence also suggests that protein intakes of 2.2-3g/kg in lean athletes help with LEAN MASS RETENTION, and the physiological and psychological stressors associated with high volume or intense training.


Regarding carbs, I want to loose a bit of weight not muscles.

Yes, but the guidelines given in the sticky for protein intake does take that into account. You certainly don't need 1.5x your BW in protein, even on a cut, and I'm very doubtful that you qualify as a lean athlete.

Carbs will not hinder LBM retention, either.

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 06:53 AM
Yes, but the guidelines given in the sticky for protein intake does take that into account. You certainly don't need 1.5x your BW in protein, even on a cut, and I'm very doubtful that you qualify as a lean athlete.


Indeed not a lean athlete, but still trying to build and retain muscles.
2h gym 5/6 times a week
Will try to lower it down then and see how it works for me.



Carbs will not hinder LBM retention, either.

What will then? BCAA? I've just got a pack and I'm giving it a go post weight training but right before finishing up my session with some cardio.

Anthony21
09-02-2014, 06:55 AM
Build muscles in a caloric deficit :confused:

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 07:00 AM
Build muscles in a caloric deficit :confused:

Well yeah fair enough, but like I said I'm almost to the weight I want to be. All I want is to be toned/lean.

kimilkwon
09-02-2014, 07:02 AM
How long have you been working out? You can take that amount of proteins but it will replace the amount of carbs you take. If you take low amounts of carbs, the body will break that down for energy.

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 07:09 AM
Without meaning to sound offensive, I don't think you have the right understanding of even basic nutrition to be worrying about BCAAs and so on right now.

Take some time to read the stickies in this forum and the losing fat forum. Then if you have questions to ask, they won't be so basic.

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 07:09 AM
How long have you been working out? You can take that amount of proteins but it will replace the amount of carbs you take. If you take low amounts of carbs, the body will break that down for energy.

Only 2 months mate, still a newbie. But what you said was my original thought....

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 07:12 AM
Without meaning to sound offensive, I don't think you have the right understanding of even basic nutrition to be worrying about BCAAs and so on right now.

Take some time to read the stickies in this forum and the losing fat forum. Then if you have questions to ask, they won't be so basic.


You're pretty on point I'm still learning, went through most of the stickies but trying also to learn from my mistakes and see how my body response to a few different things...

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 07:44 AM
You're pretty on point I'm still learning, went through most of the stickies but trying also to learn from my mistakes and see how my body response to a few different things...

You'll find that the consensus to that is that 2 months is not really enough time to see any appreciable difference between dietary changes... meaning it's far too early to know if you're making any "mistakes" right now, particularly as your body is still responding to changes in activity level and type, as well as diet.

Best plan of action is to start with a diet that's as unrestrictive as possible, and only restrict foods that are medically problematic for you. Dairy, if you're lactose intolerant, for example.

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 07:57 AM
Best plan of action is to start with a diet that's as unrestrictive as possible, and only restrict foods that are medically problematic for you. Dairy, if you're lactose intolerant, for example.

Hold on, unrestrictive diet even though I want to trim some fat down?
I can tell a massive difference between my pevious diet and the one I'm on now (mainly protein, greens, fruits & nuts) as I lost about 5kg in 2 months...

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 08:01 AM
In terms of food groups, yes.

KAJe9
09-02-2014, 09:47 AM
It is not necessary to restrict food groups when trying to lose weight.

markmoelen
09-02-2014, 02:00 PM
It is not necessary to restrict food groups when trying to lose weight.

Meaning I still need carbs & sugar of course, but in lower quantity, right?

Connor1226
09-02-2014, 02:50 PM
Yes, but the guidelines given in the sticky for protein intake does take that into account. You certainly don't need 1.5x your BW in protein, even on a cut, and I'm very doubtful that you qualify as a lean athlete.

Carbs will not hinder LBM retention, either.

While it doesn't bring greater benefit to consume more than 1.0g of protein per pound of body weight, it doesn't hurt either. On a cut it really wouldn't matter if he's taking most of his cals for protein provided he's getting enough fat. I would think only when bulking does over consuming protein matter and only for the reason that you'd want to make sure you are taking in enough carbs (because you are giving carb cals to protein).

TheTosser
09-02-2014, 03:41 PM
While it doesn't bring greater benefit to consume more than 1.0g of protein per pound of body weight, it doesn't hurt either. On a cut it really wouldn't matter if he's taking most of his cals for protein provided he's getting enough fat. I would think only when bulking does over consuming protein matter and only for the reason that you'd want to make sure you are taking in enough carbs (because you are giving carb cals to protein).

Certainly doesn't hurt, unless it's wildly excessive, I realise that. And most people will certainly be slightly over/under their protein goal per day anyway. The point is that it's unnecessary to go that high, especially if you're spending money on supplements to reach that goal.

Connor1226
09-02-2014, 06:16 PM
The point is that it's unnecessary to go that high, especially if you're spending money on supplements to reach that goal.

This is true. Can't argue with that one.

wrhalljr
09-03-2014, 02:39 PM
Meaning I still need carbs & sugar of course, but in lower quantity, right?

Absolutely not! You do not "need" carbs and/or sugar at all...and especially not "of course"...

wrhalljr
09-03-2014, 02:59 PM
Macronutrient Intake

Ensure that your intake of macronutrients meets sufficiency (as defined below), with remaining macronutrient composition of the diet being largely a function of personal preference.

Ideally, ensure macronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.



Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)

This research link, that I've seen many times before, does not look at body composition...and that is what matters to most...when body composition is measured low carbohydrate diets consistently show superior benefits in LBM with total calories being equal...not to mention better key blood markers...