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LKvvvv
08-22-2014, 05:27 AM
Cliffs
Went to see a Doctor to get my blood taken some months ago.
He found that my tsh levels were a bit higher than average
He tells me to see an Endocrinologist and get my thyroid X-rayed
Got it X-rayed and there werent any cancerous nodes, etc
Up until I had my blood taken, I was doing cardio 30 minutes a day and lifting 5 days a week
Never really experienced any of the hyperthyroid symptoms he mentioned(especially weight loss lol)
They want to put me on Tapazole now and what I really want to know is if exercise can raise your tsh levels because it can deff raise your metabolism

I do understand that this isn't something to play with, but I really don't wanna screw with my hormone levels if I don't have to. It's pretty scary. Yes, I also know you guys aren't Doctors but i'm sure there is someone with knowledge on the subject or had a similar experience to mine

spinietzschon
08-22-2014, 08:01 AM
Cliffs
Went to see a Doctor to get my blood taken some months ago.
He found that my tsh levels were a bit higher than average
He tells me to see an Endocrinologist and get my thyroid X-rayed
Got it X-rayed and there werent any cancerous nodes, etc
Up until I had my blood taken, I was doing cardio 30 minutes a day and lifting 5 days a week
Never really experienced any of the hyperthyroid symptoms he mentioned(especially weight loss lol)
They want to put me on Tapazole now and what I really want to know is if exercise can raise your tsh levels because it can deff raise your metabolism

I do understand that this isn't something to play with, but I really don't wanna screw with my hormone levels if I don't have to. It's pretty scary. Yes, I also know you guys aren't Doctors but i'm sure there is someone with knowledge on the subject or had a similar experience to mine

Actually I am an MD but it doesn't really feel real till I'm through residency which is still a ways off.

So TRH is released from hypothalamus and acts upon anterior pituitary gland; which secretes TSH to act upon thyroid gland to make T3/T4. Not sure if this was clear from your response. Now if you are HYPER (high) or HYPO (low) thyroid (T3/T4) you'll get different results. Your title says you want to boost your thyroid levels (T3/T4) which is consistent with the high TSH finding (if you have low T3/T4 your TSH jacks up in order to make the thyroid pick up the pace and bring back to normal). HOWEVER you said "he" (doc?) mentioned "HYPERthyroid" levels which is the opposite situation - you would have high T3/T4; if you had this situation you would expect LOW TSH (and low TRH but that is not on the more basic screen). So just be careful how you ask or you could really end up in hot water when you try and research these things on your own (or other ppl do without having knowledge of these issues and just googling the words you use and acting like they know it all)!

Now every one of these structures (hypothalamus/anterior pituitary/thyroid) can get screwed up in ways that make them work too much, too little, benign neoplasms that can be functional (secrete hormones) or nonfunctional (just grow, may crush normal structures causing less to be made than normal if it crushes too much - actually mainly ischemic damage if I recall right in all of those organs rather than mass effect but don't quote me on that detail). The hormoes themselves can get messed up, or the receptors, or pathways associated. So every part of this multi-step system can get screwy and it's hard to actually know how to answer your question... In essence can a certain type of exercise obviate the need for medical monitoring and management? **** no. The problem is when people find a paper published in the peer reviewed literature that seems to suggest that a given type of supplement or exercise or whatever can increase levels by such and such amount, but don't have a medical background - doses matter (50% increase even with great correlation might not make a clinical level difference... or might be huge... it depends situationally), how the experiments were run really really matters (were they done on humans? Was it only elderly females with osteoporosis compared to those without in the study group? Was the test done on levels taken on one day or was this a 10 year study that will actually give you an idea of the chronic physical effects? Was there even a control group to compare to? Was the study actually even looking at what you're trying to answer or was it only a peripheral issue and you're extrapolating too much? Etc etc etc)

SO I am a doc and can assure you you need to have lab values to do any better than I'm doing here to orient my answer, anybody who says different should be shamed for it. And I would be vary wary of just googling or pubmeding or uptodate searching terms and trying to piece things together, as this can be very quickly misleading even for professionals if you don't have proper guidance (which is why there are condensed channels by which you do your search, and why you never see a doc just pubmeding blindly a topic s/he wants to look at for a patient. Well OK sometimes for an abstract on some specific issue but not to actually inform how they'll manage the patient in front of them... You get my point.)

Lastly hyper/hypo-thyroidism is super common. Some docs sort of 'treat the numbers' instead of treating the patient. Do you feel bad/off? Do mention if you don't really feel there are any symptoms. Ask if this is a condition where not taking medications is a problem, and why. I will tell you right now there are multiple conditions where you want to take meds even if you don't have any current symptoms, and this may be one of them, so if they are adamant it is worth listening. But lots of times, if you say you know lots of people's thyroid numbers are 'outside normal limits' but would rather not take any drugs if you can avoid it, the doc will at least give you all the info you need ("he" does have the numbers and can pin down what is going on after all, cannot comment further since I don't have them). Best of everything

LKvvvv
08-22-2014, 03:25 PM
Yeah, the title was a bit misleading. It was more to say that I was wondering how much exercise boosted tsh levels if at all because that would've explained my levels at the time. But good lord I appreciate the info man

Connor1226
08-22-2014, 04:55 PM
I'm glad you got a doc to answer your question. I was thinking the same thing. High TSH indicate HYPOthyroid, not hyperthyroid.
So cardio should not have impacted your TSH levels. Especially not in that way.

I was diagnosed with hypothyroid a couple years ago. An endocrinologist helped me get the right combo of treatments (I have more than one hormone issue). I get blood tests every several months to keep track of all my numbers, but as long as nothing comes back abnormal I don't see my endo.
I recently switched my family doctor from an MD to a DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine). A DO is a holistic doctor that deals more with treating an entire patient, not just a specific condition. My doc has been great with helping me lower my medications and do what I can on my own to prevent further dependence on medication.
So if you are looking for that style of health care and health management you may want to look for a DO in your area. You may also be able to find an endocrinologist that is also DO.