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LetUsWorkout
07-30-2014, 11:31 PM
I have always eaten foods like fries, chocolate, sweets, etc. I rarely have protein foods in the house as one cannot afford to purchase too much of it but I do equally eat healthy foods also. But, surely eating junk food in balance with healthy food should not be of abundant harm when trying to build in a moderate manner? If so, then what can I replace such junk habits with healthy habits that aren't too expensive?

mrzeusone
07-30-2014, 11:38 PM
I can't see how you can afford chocolates and sweets, but not protein sources. Please aware me on this justification.
Eating processed foods is never optimal, and may pose a risk to your long term health.
Instead of reaching for a processed food item, reach for a food that is in it's natural state, non-processed.

bagge677
07-30-2014, 11:44 PM
please use search function and read some stickies this is answered every day a 100x times for people who keep asking the same dumb questions.
i am honestly amazed how people dont already go ape**** insane when seeing this day for day and giving the same answer to people every ****ing day. i just came back skimming through this forum again every now and then and am already sick of it. dont know how people do it who browse it every day...

this forum should introduce a multiple choice test when wanting to write in the nutrition forum which contains basic questions about the first 2 stickies

what is it that concerns you about unhealthy food? The health side or the muscle/fat gaining side? To make the answer very short: Use your brain like a rational person. MODERATION IS KEY.

Mrpb
07-31-2014, 12:07 AM
But, surely eating junk food in balance with healthy food should not be of abundant harm when trying to build in a moderate manner?

If you are hitting your macros AND micros, staying away from trans fats and avoiding excessive fructose in take, there's no problem with consuming 'junk foods'.

WonderPug
07-31-2014, 12:15 AM
If you are hitting your macros AND micros, staying away from industrial trans fats and avoiding excessive fructose in take, there's no problem with consuming 'junk foods'.Fixed.

jp973156
07-31-2014, 10:16 AM
If you are hitting your macros AND micros, staying away from trans fats and avoiding excessive fructose in take, there's no problem with consuming 'junk foods'.

These seems a bit controversial given my understanding of nutrition, individual differences, and a plethora of known potential health mitigating factors present in 'junk foods' including, but not limited too: MSG, organochlorines, phytoestrogens, HCAs, methionine content, heavy metal overabundance, anti-nutrients, residual organic solvents from seed/plant oils, etc.

Can you elaborate please? I can understand if the goal of the OP was to "lose weight, build muscle" or something in that realm, but if the goal is to establish a "healthy diet" (which is what the OP requested information on) then that seems like it is not always the same as "lose weight, build" muscle, or something in that realm.

jp973156
07-31-2014, 10:20 AM
I have always eaten foods like fries, chocolate, sweets, etc. I rarely have protein foods in the house as one cannot afford to purchase too much of it but I do equally eat healthy foods also. But, surely eating junk food in balance with healthy food should not be of abundant harm when trying to build in a moderate manner? If so, then what can I replace such junk habits with healthy habits that aren't too expensive?

I buy 1/4 grassfed cow, whole pastured pig (organs and all), and tons of bones/chicken backs for stock about 2x a year. It works out to the same price or less per/lb than when I buy meat at the store. That's a start. I also participate in a crop share, which gives me "in-season vegetables" throughout spring/summer/fall, that actually saves me a lot of money. Vegetables/fruits really aren't that bad price-wise, although calorie per dollar is obviously biased in favor of processed foods. Of course, you could spend more on non-processed foods now and probability would dictate that in the future you spend less on health care costs associated with excessive consumption of 'processed foods'.

(Note I am using a lose definition of 'processed foods' and I don't think everything necessarily associated with the term 'processed food' requires a negative valence association).

Mrpb
07-31-2014, 10:27 AM
Can you elaborate please? I can understand if the goal of the OP was to "lose weight, build muscle" or something in that realm, but if the goal is to establish a "healthy diet" (which is what the OP requested information on) then that seems like it is not always the same as "lose weight, build" muscle, or something in that realm.

It's a simple guideline, that works well in practice. It doesn't cover every single potential hazard; obviously one should limit mercury intake for example.

Keep in mind that we're talking to a 18 year old 5'11", 119 lbs (!). The last thing I want to do is talk him into obsessive food restriction.

jp973156
07-31-2014, 10:51 AM
It's a simple guideline, that works well in practice. It doesn't cover all hazards, obviously one should limit mercury intake for example.

Keep in mind that we're talking to a 18 year old 5'11", 119 lbs (!). The last thing I want to do is talk him into obsessive food restriction.

PS. As far as I know the preponderance of the evidence shows MSG is no problem for ~99% of the population.

Agreed. Also, agreed on MSG issue; all the scientific evidence against it is from epidemiological studies, and MSG doesn't even cross the blood-brain barrier. MSG doses necessary to illicit adverse physiological effects peripherally are not generally obtainable in modern diets. But, as with supplement use I tend to err on the side of caution, personally.