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Rodgerskc
07-22-2014, 02:54 PM
Alright I'm a guy 6'1 currently weigh 236 lbs and have about 23.7% bf. I have estimated my maint. calories at around 2550 and I'm fairly active, lift and cardio 6 days a week.

I have been dieting for a few months pretty hard and I plateaued on low calories so I decided to try and fix my diet. I started out by trying to bring my macros up to acceptable levels again and start calorie cycling. (Have any of you had success with this type of dieting?)

Goal macros:

250g protein / 200g carb / 39g fat. while on ~2200

219g protein / 170g carb / 27g fat. and cycle in weeks of ~1800

My end goal is to be around 13-15% bf by the end of October but I'm starting to feel like that might be a stretch. How do those macros look? Is it possible?

Thanks for any helpful input!

ironwill2008
07-22-2014, 03:15 PM
Alright I'm a guy 6'1 currently weigh 236 lbs and have about 23.7% bf. I have estimated my maint. calories at around 2550 and I'm fairly active, lift and cardio 6 days a week.

I have been dieting for a few months pretty hard and I plateaued on low calories so I decided to try and fix my diet. I started out by trying to bring my macros up to acceptable levels again and start calorie cycling. (Have any of you had success with this type of dieting?)

Goal macros:

250g protein / 200g carb / 39g fat. while on ~2200

219g protein / 170g carb / 27g fat. and cycle in weeks of ~1800

My end goal is to be around 13-15% bf by the end of October but I'm starting to feel like that might be a stretch. How do those macros look? Is it possible?

Thanks for any helpful input!

@236/24%, Katch-Mcardle has your maintenance at about 3600 calories; to lose fat, you'd reduce that to about 2600, and then look for a drop in your body weight of about 2 pounds per week (a fairly steep rate of loss, but doable for someone over 200 pounds).


To get to 13% will require you to lose about 10% of your body weight, or about 23 pounds. At 2 pounds a week, that will get you there by the end of October. But be advised, you'll have to be meticulous in your weighing/measuring/tracking all your food portions, and you'll have to hit all your calorie/macro numbers every day.



Use this rule-of-thumb to fill your daily calorie/macro totals:

*1 gram of protein per pound of body weight (4 calories per gram)

*1/2 gram of fat per pound of body weight (9 calories per gram)

*Remainder of daily calorie requirement can then be made up of carbs, more protein, more fat, or any combination of the three that you enjoy.








http://assets.bodybuilding.com/forum/images/icons/icon2.gif You'll also have to train like every time in the gym is your last day on Earth if you expect to retain as much muscle as possible during such a steep calorie deficit.

Rodgerskc
07-22-2014, 04:54 PM
I would like to try and get my calories that high but never in my life have I eaten 3600 calories in one day. If anything I was at 34% bf 260lbs. I was eating less than one real meal a day on average. I think I was surviving completely on beer.

How is my maintenance 3600 if ive gotten to this point only ever eating as much as 2500? I'm not sure how this works.

ironwill2008
07-22-2014, 05:50 PM
How is my maintenance 3600 if ive gotten to this point only ever eating as much as 2500? I'm not sure how this works.

I inputted your stats into the standard K-M formula found in the stickies; of all the formulas, it's the most accurate since it takes body fat level into consideration. 3600 cals/day is not high for someone your size, especially for someone moderately lean, and training 6 days a week and stating he's 'fairy active.'

I can't comment on your 2500; maybe you didn't track accurately; maybe you have more than 24% body fat (which will reduce your calorie requirement). Accurately means using a food scale, and weighing/measuring/tracking all your food portions, and not relying on eyeball estimates or package information.

Rodgerskc
07-22-2014, 06:21 PM
Accurately means using a food scale, and weighing/measuring/tracking all your food portions, and not relying on eyeball estimates or package information.

I weigh all my food before I cook it, I also weigh the meals to make sure they are relatively the same. I do however use the package nutritional information in order to judge calories. Is there another calorie information resource I should be using?

Also would you suggest I try and get up to my maint for a while to allow my metabolism to catch up? For the past at least two months I've been only eating 1900-1700 calories. I stopped losing weight and started needing twice the recovery time. I believe what you are saying is accurate and I've really just been that mistaken for so long.

ironwill2008
07-22-2014, 07:18 PM
I weigh all my food before I cook it, I also weigh the meals to make sure they are relatively the same. I do however use the package nutritional information in order to judge calories. Is there another calorie information resource I should be using?

Package info can be off by as much as 20% and still be within limits set by FDA; with such a margin of "acceptable" error, it can add up to a substantial amount in the course of an entire day's food. It's best to weigh everything uncooked, and then get your calorie/macro info from one of the online sites such as myfitnesspal, fitday, or even just Google.





Also would you suggest I try and get up to my maint for a while to allow my metabolism to catch up? For the past at least two months I've been only eating 1900-1700 calories. I stopped losing weight and started needing twice the recovery time. I believe what you are saying is accurate and I've really just been that mistaken for so long.

If you've been eating at such a large deficit, yes, ease back up to at least 3000 calories for a couple of weeks, and see how you feel.