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View Full Version : Weigh Sweet Potatoes - Before or After cooking? also, is this accurate



MiKroN
06-08-2014, 07:11 PM
Using this, does it match up to your nutrition facts for a sweet potato:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2667/2

I bake my sweet potatoes in the oven and eat the skin as well. No salt. So this seems like it makes sense, but since it says baked, should I weigh it after It's baked? Or before, and then bake it?

I searched and found this same question asked a bunch of times, but every one I clicked on the answers contradicted each other like:

"Weigh all food raw"
"You're eating it cooked so weigh it cooked"
"Yes that makes sense to both il do that!"


So what do you do? Trying to be accurate as I can here :)

cls91
06-08-2014, 07:14 PM
Raw

cumminslifter
06-08-2014, 07:30 PM
everything raw

MiKroN
06-08-2014, 10:00 PM
Ok I'll weigh them raw from now on. I was just ocnfused because it said "baked" in the description of the item instead of "raw"

dgray101
06-08-2014, 10:22 PM
I'd personally weigh it after it's cooked, honestly I don't feel it's much of a difference unless perhaps your adding things. I make mashed sweet potatoes and I just weigh it out before I pack it for lunch

MiKroN
06-08-2014, 10:48 PM
It is a big difference though. I don't add anything but It can lose around 4oz when cooked. a 500 gram potato becomes 300 grams, and you mistrack 200+ calories for a single meal. :(

IK9
06-08-2014, 10:55 PM
Pick one method & stick with it [=

maXmood
06-09-2014, 02:40 AM
It is a big difference though. I don't add anything but It can lose around 4oz when cooked. a 500 gram potato becomes 300 grams, and you mistrack 200+ calories for a single meal. :(
this is true.. however, imo when you're cutting, you're better doing it raw cuz that assures you're on deficit..

99% i do raw..

legitsrs
06-09-2014, 04:12 AM
Yeah definitely raw.

I microwave them, and for a long time I was weighing them before eating and they lose so much goddamn weight.

Always raw.

diesel678
06-09-2014, 06:26 AM
Nope, weigh food after cooking then find the calorie information for the cooked weight of that food. there will be calorie information for both cooked (with different methods of cooking) and raw food. if you are calculating the raw weight of the food, then cooking it, you are under/overestimating your calories. cooked food will have higher calories per gram, and the nutritional information on packaging usually only show the calories by weight of the raw food

cumminslifter
06-09-2014, 05:39 PM
Nope, weigh food after cooking then find the calorie information for the cooked weight of that food. there will be calorie information for both cooked (with different methods of cooking) and raw food. if you are calculating the raw weight of the food, then cooking it, you are under/overestimating your calories. cooked food will have higher calories per gram, and the nutritional information on packaging usually only show the calories by weight of the raw foodno, stop giving poor information

manny1519
10-07-2014, 04:57 PM
Not to be captain obvious but calorie is a measure of energy that can be burned either on a treadmill or with a match...that said the key is to not over cook your food to the point of extinction. If you like burnt toast I suggest you don't include the total calories of that in your macros.

EjnarKolinkar
10-07-2014, 05:13 PM
Using this, does it match up to your nutrition facts for a sweet potato:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2667/2

I bake my sweet potatoes in the oven and eat the skin as well. No salt. So this seems like it makes sense, but since it says baked, should I weigh it after It's baked? Or before, and then bake it?

I searched and found this same question asked a bunch of times, but every one I clicked on the answers contradicted each other like:

"Weigh all food raw"
"You're eating it cooked so weigh it cooked"
"Yes that makes sense to both il do that!"


So what do you do? Trying to be accurate as I can here :)






Yes, OP ^this is a baked value. What you want is to find the raw value on the same site, and use the raw weight.

loganhart
10-07-2014, 05:17 PM
Most calorie trackers have both raw and cooked weight options.

Pick one and be consistent.

MetilHed
10-07-2014, 07:12 PM
Not to be captain obvious but calorie is a measure of energy that can be burned either on a treadmill or with a match...that said the key is to not over cook your food to the point of extinction. If you like burnt toast I suggest you don't include the total calories of that in your macros.


Strong first post of stupid.