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DirtyTrickster
05-28-2014, 06:01 AM
What is the best way to apply for a different position in the company one currently works in?

Does one let their current group of supervisors know before hand or do they just do it and not tell anyone?
The supervisors will find out eventually, but If one doesn't get the new position how is the day to day going to be from that point on?

MiklaDfar
05-28-2014, 06:15 AM
I always believe in being straight up, whether it be with employees or supervisors. Not sure of your working relationship with your supervisor, but I would suggest you talk with him/her and let them know of your interest and why. The best thing you can do is get them to be an advocate and help you get that position. You never know, there might be something else your supervisor knows of that may interest you. If you approach it as an opportunity for growth and expansion, the supervisor would have to be a real dik not to support you. If you just do it and not tell anyone you risk being one of "those" employees that is in it for himself. Which, in reality, there is nothing wrong with... but there is politics in all companies and being on the wrong side can hurt you long term. Also, in some companies, the current manager can block an employee transfer though there is usually a time limit (e.g., after one year at current job, the employee can transfer at will).
Good Luck!

ajdahlheimer
05-28-2014, 06:26 AM
Yes, it really depends on what your working relationship with your current manager/supervisor is like. He/she will find out anyway though, like you said.

In a perfect world, your current boss should want you to progress as an employee--especially within the company. But in reality, that isn't always the case. Will you leaving the dept. cause your manager any headaches? Does he/she have any issues with you professionally with your work ethic? These are just a couple reasons managers choose to block internal moves.

Again, it really just comes down to what kind of trust you have with your current manager. If you aren't sure, I would just apply and do not say anything.

dazlittle
05-28-2014, 06:39 AM
This is currently happening to me, one of my guys has applied for a management position outside of IT. He spoke to the MD of the company to confirm he was suitable and then approached me to tell me what and why.

I would never stand in the way of one of my direct reports trying to better themselves.

Our relationship will not change whether he gets the position or not, due to our great working relationship he has also offered to split his time 50/50 until I backfill.

DirtyTrickster
05-28-2014, 06:45 AM
I always believe in being straight up, whether it be with employees or supervisors. Not sure of your working relationship with your supervisor, but I would suggest you talk with him/her and let them know of your interest and why. The best thing you can do is get them to be an advocate and help you get that position. You never know, there might be something else your supervisor knows of that may interest you. If you approach it as an opportunity for growth and expansion, the supervisor would have to be a real dik not to support you. If you just do it and not tell anyone you risk being one of "those" employees that is in it for himself. Which, in reality, there is nothing wrong with... but there is politics in all companies and being on the wrong side can hurt you long term. Also, in some companies, the current manager can block an employee transfer though there is usually a time limit (e.g., after one year at current job, the employee can transfer at will).
Good Luck!


Yes, it really depends on what your working relationship with your current manager/supervisor is like. He/she will find out anyway though, like you said.

In a perfect world, your current boss should want you to progress as an employee--especially within the company. But in reality, that isn't always the case. Will you leaving the dept. cause your manager any headaches? Does he/she have any issues with you professionally with your work ethic? These are just a couple reasons managers choose to block internal moves.

Again, it really just comes down to what kind of trust you have with your current manager. If you aren't sure, I would just apply and do not say anything.


This is currently happening to me, one of my guys has applied for a management position outside of IT. He spoke to the MD of the company to confirm he was suitable and then approached me to tell me what and why.

I would never stand in the way of one of my direct reports trying to better themselves.

Our relationship will not change whether he gets the position or not, due to our great working relationship he has also offered to split his time 50/50 until I backfill.
Thanks for the tips.

Current working relationship with supervisor(s) is good, so I don't see any issues with that. There would be a gap that would need to be filled if my position opened up, but obviously I'd give them time to fill it.

I might confirm with hiring manager that I am a good fit as a candidate before I make any further moves.

Thanks

DuracellBunny
05-28-2014, 08:02 AM
One of the first things they will do is ask your current supervisor (either formally or informally) for an appraisal/their personal opinion of you. As your supervisor will play a role in whether you get the new position or not, you want them on your side, so yes, tell them.

There is how things should work in an ideal world and there is how things work in the real world. In the real world, your supervisor will make or break your chances.

ajdahlheimer
05-28-2014, 08:11 AM
In the real world, your supervisor will make or break your chances.

Not all the time though. It's possible the hiring manager may already have an opinion on the supervisor/the supervisor's views. i.e. The hiring manager thinks the guy is full of **** or is a snake who has tried to block things in the past. Just sayin....

DuracellBunny
05-28-2014, 08:29 AM
Not all the time though. It's possible the hiring manager may already have an opinion on the supervisor/the supervisor's views. i.e. The hiring manager thinks the guy is full of **** or is a snake who has tried to block things in the past. Just sayin....

In that situation, the upervisor will still make or break it, but for different reasons. The new manager might hire you to spite the old one, think if they hate you then you must be a good guy, think if they are giving you a good reference that you are a toady or suck at your job and they want you out of their department or all sorts of things.

Your supervisor's opinion of you and how your potential new manager's opinion of your supervisor colours the interpretation still mean than your supervisor's opinion has great weight.

Phattso
05-28-2014, 08:40 AM
If it were me, I would definitely tell my supervisor that I am planning on applying for another position. Nothing is wrong with ambition and most of the time if you do not try and advance, you may end up where you are. You are working for you. Promote you, but tactfully and professionally.

ajdahlheimer
05-28-2014, 08:44 AM
Yeah, it will always carry weight. That's one of the reasons I have only moved externally when changing jobs. You can just check a box that says do not contact your current manager. As long as your managers before your current position are willing to give you a good reference---you're good to go. I always preferred to move externally rather than internally---because the raises are so much greater (since the new external company doesn't know what you are making, whereas they do internally and will give you a %).

jcpeyton
05-28-2014, 08:51 AM
It's healthy to aspire for career progression. Just have an off the cuff convo with your Supervisor about career progression and explore his/her thoughts. Provided that goes well you can insert a comment about the other position that's available and see what their thoughts or recommendations are - all the while ensuring them that you like and appreciate your current position and will always work hard for them while you are there. That way you are in control of the convo and can adjust accordingly based on the outcome.

Richie71
05-29-2014, 12:47 AM
Depends on the company and role I suppose, but should be part of your regular reviews. I always ask my team members what they want to do next in their career and it's important to me to be able to help them do that. I feel if I can continue to show I can progress people in their careers, that helps me attract better people, and is a better path than just trying to hold on to the same staff forever. Plus if they tell me, I can plan for replacements or re-arrangements.

beachguy498
05-29-2014, 04:56 AM
I did it at my job 2 years ago. I wasn't happy where I was and the old group I was with about 5 years back had an opening which I stumbled upon by accident. They were sort of shocked that I'd think of coming back and paved the way for me. The business was split into 2 sectors at the time that didn't interact much. So it had to be okayed at the end I was going to first with a formal interview. Then they had to go to my supervisor, who was not happy but had to let me go. This year, both parts of the business were put back together so I was the advance party for the rest of my old group that was moved over.

I would just follow the lead of HR or whoever is facilitating the move. In my case, word got around months before the move, which took about 5 months with transitioning my old work and tying up loose ends. I would try to stay on the good side of everybody.

Rob