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danb1202
05-09-2014, 03:57 AM
Hi all,

New to the forum and after trying several different approaches I have read online i'm still at a loss and would greatly appreciate anyone's input.

I started training around 6 months ago, and have seen an increase in both muscle strength and stamina, but have had real trouble gaining any mass.

An average days diet would be something along the lines of:

Breakfast: 250-300g oats with full fat milk, a 500ml glass of full fat milk and a protein shake.

Will snack on either almonds or cashew nuts throughout the morning.

Lunch: 150-200g Plain rice, fish with broccoli or kale, another 500ml glass of full fat milk.

Snack on more nuts and raisins throughout the day.

Dinner: 200g dry weight of pasta and a medium chicken breast with grated cheese and some form of sauce (bolognese as example), another protein shake.

Obviously this does change just given as an example.

I generally train as follows:

day 1 Back and chest
day 2 legs
day 3 abs and arms
day 4 rest
day 5 Back and chest
day 6 legs
day 7 abs and arms


I am 24/m currently weighing 160lb.

Ive tried changing what times im eating, how much im eating, but doesnt seem to make any difference.

Any help would be great!!

AlwaysTryin
05-09-2014, 04:06 AM
Why do you have days dedicated to arms?

WonderPug
05-09-2014, 04:07 AM
Two suggestions: get a proper lifting program and a proper diet.

To learn about proven lifting routines, please see the exercise program stickies and select a 5x5 program.

To start learning the basics about nutrition, please read the relevant stickies at the top of the nutrition forum as well as this:

COMPOSING A RATIONAL DIET

Advice on diet and nutrition is often based on myths and, even more so, on the marketing message of supplement companies and self-proclaimed diet gurus with agendas contrary to your interests. Please don't allow yourself, your health, your fitness goals or your wallet to be compromised by the prevalent misinformation. Learn the basics of nutrition and start engaging in healthy, rational dietary habits that can last a lifetime.

The first step is to discard biased advice on nutrition and diet, and, in its place, embrace simple logic:



Compose a diet that ensures micronutrient and macronutrient sufficiency, derived predominantly from whole and minimally processed foods if possible, with remaining caloric intake being largely discretionary within the bounds of common sense.




Caloric Intake

Energy balance is the primary dietary driver of body weight and it also impacts body composition. A chronic surplus of calories will result in increased body weight and a chronic deficit of calories will result in a loss of body weight.

In other words, in order to gain about one pound of tissue weight (as opposed to transient flux in water weight), you need to consume a total of about 3,500 calories more than you expend. And to lose about one pound of tissue weight, you have to do the opposite -- consume about 3,500 calories less than you expend.

Thus, the first step in constructing any rational diet is to get a sense of how many calories per day, on average, you should consume in order to progress towards your goals.

The average number of calories you expend per day -- called total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) -- is a function of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and your average weekly activity level.

To estimate your BMR, it's important to have a sense of how much lean body mass (LBM) you carry. If you're not sure, post a photo or two and we can estimate your percentage body fat and, from this number and your total body weight, it's easy to estimate LBM by using the following formula:



LBM = body weight * (1 - percentage body fat)


To estimate BMR, use the the Katch-McArdle formula:



BMR = 370 + (9.8 * LBM in pounds)
or
BMR = 370 + (21.6 * LBM in kg)


The next step is to estimate average weekly activity using the following guidelines to calculate an activity factor (AF):




• 1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

• 1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

• 1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

• 1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

• 1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.


Macronutrient Intake

Ensure that your intake of macronutrients meets sufficiency (as defined below), with remaining macronutrient composition of the diet being largely a function of personal preference.

Ideally, ensure macronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.



Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight (or target/ideal weight in the obese) -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)



Micronutrient Intake

Take care and use good judgement in food selection and portioning to ensure that micronutrient sufficiency is reached without excessive intake from dietary sources and/or supplements.

As with macronutrient sufficiency, one should ensure micronutrient sufficiency predominantly or, ideally, entirely from whole and minimally processed foods.

To get a good sense of recommended intake of vitamins and minerals, please review this (http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/dietary-guidance/dietary-reference-intakes/dri-tables) USDA guidelines webpage.

You'll find the following information particularly helpful:




Intakes: Recommended Intakes for Individuals (http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/5_Summary%20Table%20Tables%201-4.pdf)

RDA and Adequate Intake for Vitamins and Elements (http://iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/RDA%20and%20AIs_Vitamin%20and%20Elements.pdf)

Upper Limit for Vitamins and Elements (http://iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/SummaryDRIs/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/ULs%20for%20Vitamins%20and%20Elements.pdf)

Electrolytes and Water (http://www.iom.edu/Global/News%20Announcements/~/media/442A08B899F44DF9AAD083D86164C75B.ashx)




Meal Timing, Composition & Frequency

The number of meals you consume, the timing of those meals and the macro/micronutrient composition of each meal is largely a function of personal preference.

While it might be "optimal" to consume more than one meal per day and less than 5 meals per day, the simple truth is that any difference that directly results from such fine tuning is likely too small to notice even after years of training.

Thus, base your meal timing, composition and frequency on your subjective preference such as to optimize your sense of energy, performance, satiety, palatability, convenience, social/business life and sustainability.

Do not hesitate to very all three factors from day to day as circumstance dictates. In other words, do not become a slave to routine, with inflexibility compromising your quality of life.


Pre & Post Workout Nutrition

What (if anything) you consume before and after your workout does not play a significant direct role in the outcome of your diet, beyond personal preference.

Why? Because what matters in terms of direct impact on outcomes is total daily intake of all nutrients.

Thus, you should optimize based on how you respond to training in a fed or fasted state, and based on your hungry after exercise. In other words, use common sense.


Supplements

Supplements are just that, products that are intended to supplement deficiencies in your diet. If your diet is properly composed then there's no need or unique benefit to using supplements.

If your diet isn't properly composed and, thus, you have deficiencies, try to fix your diet to cure such deficiencies though the consumption of whole and minimally processed foods. If you can't fix your diet, then use the lowest dose supplement(a) needed to cure any remaining deficiencies.

iwanthops
05-09-2014, 09:43 AM
Gosh wonderpug, you always cover *everything* and make it pointless to ever reply to any of these threads. Not complaining, just giving you props! :)

OP, I know it's long, but read every bit of wonderpug's post, and re-read it until you understand it all. This stuff here is solid information.

AdamOfEden
05-09-2014, 09:44 AM
Either HST or 5x5 brah

and eat erything you see

AdamOfEden
05-09-2014, 09:44 AM
Gosh wonderpug, you always cover *everything* and make it pointless to ever reply to any of these threads. Not complaining, just giving you props! :)

OP, I know it's long, but read every bit of wonderpug's post, and re-read it until you understand it all. This stuff here is solid information.
suk his dik too

no diss though

SM15
05-10-2014, 06:08 AM
Read the stickies in this forum, particularly on counting calories and macronutrients. This will explain WHY you are not gaining mass.

Guardian14
05-10-2014, 06:16 AM
Hi all,

New to the forum and after trying several different approaches I have read online i'm still at a loss and would greatly appreciate anyone's input.

I started training around 6 months ago, and have seen an increase in both muscle strength and stamina, but have had real trouble gaining any mass.

An average days diet would be something along the lines of:

Breakfast: 250-300g oats with full fat milk, a 500ml glass of full fat milk and a protein shake.

Will snack on either almonds or cashew nuts throughout the morning.

Lunch: 150-200g Plain rice, fish with broccoli or kale, another 500ml glass of full fat milk.

Snack on more nuts and raisins throughout the day.

Dinner: 200g dry weight of pasta and a medium chicken breast with grated cheese and some form of sauce (bolognese as example), another protein shake.

Obviously this does change just given as an example.

I generally train as follows:

day 1 Back and chest
day 2 legs
day 3 abs and arms
day 4 rest
day 5 Back and chest
day 6 legs
day 7 abs and arms


I am 24/m currently weighing 160lb.

Ive tried changing what times im eating, how much im eating, but doesnt seem to make any difference.

Any help would be great!!


I was a skinny runt then I took up
4 x 4 routine 20 years ago ate huge meals 5 times a day and bulked up 10 kilos

Try
Day 1 chest shoulders
Day two legs arms
Day three rest

Stick to two exercises per body part for now mainly compound lifts in the 4 rep range and increase every set by 5 pounds 5 to 6 sets each

With the exception of legs I'd squat 12 to 15 reps for 3 sets

Eat 4 to 5 meals say every 4 hours

When you've bulked up in 6 months you can add other lifts like rows , pull ups and isolation exercises

Keep your workout under 50 minutes
Lift heavy

You grow on your rest days

Cheers

NattyRex
05-10-2014, 06:29 AM
If ya think ya eat a lot, eat more.