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hammerfelt
05-06-2014, 06:36 AM
Let's face it, we're all getting up there in age, some more than others, some are already there.

How many of these do you do? I'm batting a little over 500.

http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Headline/frailty-aging-Schwartz-disabilities/2014/05/05/id/569603/


About 3.3 million Americans 1 in 7 people ages 65 and older live in nursing homes, and their numbers are projected to increase sharply as America ages. It's the last place most people want to spend their golden years: a study found that aging Americans feared losing their independence and moving to a nursing home more than they feared dying. How do you avoid a nursing home? "Avoid frailty," says nationally renowned wellness expert Dr. Erika Schwartz.

"Frail people are old people, and they break and get sick and belong in nursing homes," she tells Newsmax Health. Use Dr. Schwartz' tips to help avoid going to a nursing home by keeping your brain sharp and your body strong and healthy.

1. Exercise regularly. "Thirty minutes of exercise every day will keep you from becoming frail and your mind from getting senile," says Dr. Schwartz. Hundreds of studies have found that exercise fights heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, obesity, insomnia, depression, and can even give your sex life a boost. A study published in the British medical journal BMJ found that exercise can be as effective as drugs for many diseases of aging, including heart disease and diabetes.

2. Keep your weight in check. "Keeping your weight normal and your BMI less than 20 will help prevent you from getting old and sick," says Dr. Schwartz. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society found that older women who were obese were at much greater risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes, depression, and cognitive impairment than women of normal weight. Other studies have shown that obesity increases the risk of frailty in both older men and women.

3. Get enough sleep. "Sleep between seven and nine hours a night," suggests Dr. Schwartz. A recent study from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia showed that people who usually slept less than six hours had a higher risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, and diabetes. Researchers at Johns Hopkins found that not getting enough quality sleep is associated with the first signs of Alzheimer's disease. People who reported troubled sleep or sleeping less had higher levels of beta amyloid plaque in their brains.

4. Stay positive. A growing number of studies show that older people who feel good about aging are more likely to live longer, be healthier, and remain free of disabilities than those who hold negative stereotypes about growing older. Yale researchers found that positive thinkers lived an average of 7.6 years longer than those with negative feelings about aging, and were 44 percent more likely to recover from a severe disability.

5. Eat an alkaline diet. "Alkaline diets are anti-inflammatory and will help keep you in great shape and prevent diseases of aging," says Dr. Schwartz. Alkaline diets are believed to lower acid levels in the body and make bodily fluids more alkaline. They emphasize fresh fruits, vegetables, and nuts, and are low in meat, sugar, dairy, and most grains.

6. Manage stress. Stress in your life now can affect how well you age. A study published in the journal PLoS One found that stress shortened the end sections of DNA called telomeres. Shortened telomeres have been tied to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's. Studies have also shown that chronic stress contributes to the development of Alzheimer's. Identify your sources of stress and figure out ways to control it. For example, if your stress is caused by always saying "yes," learn to say no and reduce your commitments.

7. Read instead of watching television. "Reading keeps more of your senses involved," says Dr. Schwartz. "TV is a passive activity which makes us stupid and increases senility rates." A study which appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that people who spend long hours in front of the television had approximately a 2.5 higher risk of developing Alzheimer's than those who engaged in hobbies such as reading, playing musical instruments, and working crossword puzzles.

8. Eat fish. The American Heart Association recommends at least two servings a week of fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids. In addition to being heart healthy, a recent study from the University of South Dakota found that fish is good for your brain. Researchers found that postmenopausal women who had the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood had overall greater brain volume than women with the lowest levels, including the hippocampus, the area of the brain most affected by Alzheimer's. Dr. Schwartz warns to choose varieties low in mercury, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines.

9. Drink Water. "Drinking a lot of water is important," says Dr. Schwartz. Every system in your body needs water to function carrying nutrients to cells and flushing out toxins. Most experts advise drinking eight 8 ounce glasses daily. But make sure the water you drink is free from contaminants. Filtered water is best, but if you drink tap water, use cold water and let it run at least a minute before using. About 15 percent of brain-destroying lead exposure in the United States comes from drinking water, and warm and hot water can contain higher levels of lead than cold.

10. Take vitamins and supplements. Dr. Schwartz recommends the following daily vitamins and supplements "if you are looking to keep your energy high, boost your immune system, decrease inflammation, and support hormone production:"

cowboybiker
05-06-2014, 06:42 AM
Came in expecting escape plans.

Leaving disappointed.

hammerfelt
05-06-2014, 07:03 AM
Came in expecting escape plans.

Leaving disappointed.

Don't want to disappoint

http://0.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.com/19/28/3c3cebbdfe347af7ba3225540db9c313.jpg

cowboybiker
05-06-2014, 07:19 AM
I've studied One flew over the cuckoo's nest.
Cause sadly, I believe my retirement home is going to be like that.

Cass40
05-06-2014, 08:04 AM
I've studied One flew over the cuckoo's nest.
Cause sadly, I believe my retirement home is going to be like that.

She'll be waiting!!

http://cdn.gifbay.com/2013/02/magic_mike_loosens_up_nurse_ratched-35526.gif

ajdahlheimer
05-06-2014, 08:27 AM
I've studied One flew over the cuckoo's nest.
Cause sadly, I believe my retirement home is going to be like that.

Chief Bromden: My pop was real big. He did like he pleased. That's why everybody worked on him. The last time I seen my father, he was blind and diseased from drinking. And every time he put the bottle to his mouth, he didn't suck out of it, it sucked out of him until he shrunk so wrinkled and yellow even the dogs didn't know him.

McMurphy: Killed him, huh?

Chief Bromden: I'm not saying they killed him. They just worked on him. The way they're working on you.

crupiea
05-06-2014, 08:33 AM
I like that list but one thing that i would put on it it to avoid the doctor.

Imagine that you bought a brand new car right off the assembly line and took it to a trusted mechanic and had him go over every nut and bolt to find something wrong with it. Chances are he would. Also chances are it would have ran fine for the entire life of the car and the trouble would have never shown itself.

Keep taking the car to the mechanic and you know for a fact he will keep finding stuff wrong. It might start out mild but will eventually get more and more severe.

All the while it will cause you time, money and the car will degrade with so much probing, dissassembly and the like.

Sometimes its best to leave thing alone and let them work themselves out.

Of course doctors have their place but we way overuse them today.

We all have seem the storys. Carl went in for a hangnail and found out he had cancer, Well what would have happened had Carl not gone in?

Cass40
05-06-2014, 08:37 AM
I have taken care of elderly people who cannot feed themselves or go to the bathroom on their own.

I have to say that as long as I can wipe my own butt, I don't care where I am.

beachguy498
05-06-2014, 09:38 AM
I have taken care of elderly people who cannot feed themselves or go to the bathroom on their own.

I have to say that as long as I can wipe my own butt, I don't care where I am.

I've seen enough of nursing homes over the past few years to agree with this. My dad fortunately was good up until his last couple of months, but you can see how the place slowly gets them institutionalized and they sort of fade out. He was wheel chair bound, so it was a production to get him to the crapper on time. He was more ambulatory when he got there, but easier for them to keep the old folks parked all day.

I did notice that there were some relatively young people in there (75-80ish) that simply lost their ability to walk. That's what got them in there. If they have no close relatives or a healthy spouse, this is the end for them.

Rob

scullin
05-06-2014, 09:54 AM
Based on this thread I'm going to be in trouble. lol

Georgeoz
05-06-2014, 05:58 PM
Nursing homes are departure lounges and you are made to feel like that.

My late wife had dementia for almost ten years and I saw plenty of the kind and expert treatment they gave her to persuade me that I'd rather die quickly and cleanly, if necessary by taking the pink pill.

Four rules to stay fit as long as possible - (1) work out every day with heavy weights; (2) eat mostly protein and plenty of heathy fat; (3) Eat more in the morning; and (4) ejaculate regularly and frequently.

Rule (4) is probably inapplicable in the case of females.

And don't worry or feel guilty.

Oceanside
05-06-2014, 08:07 PM
I'm hoping to step off a curb and get nailed by a bus going 90 MPH when I'm 75-80....

god has a sick sense of humor sometimes when it comes to aging humans :)

Cass40
05-06-2014, 08:20 PM
(4) ejaculate regularly and frequently.

Rule (4) is probably inapplicable in the case of females.

And don't worry or feel guilty.

Well I hope so since I don't ejaculate very often!

My grandma had dementia and she was in a nursing home. The home looked very comfy, like somebody's house, and all the nurses seemed very caring. This was in Finland, though. I don't know how they are here.

JediRN
05-06-2014, 09:04 PM
I like that list but one thing that i would put on it it to avoid the doctor.

Dangerous advise.



We all have seem the storys. Carl went in for a hangnail and found out he had cancer, Well what would have happened had Carl not gone in?

I have one too that comes to mind. I had a patient in the ICU about 5 years ago. He had had a cough but wanted to go on his vacation instead of post-poning it a day and going to see a doctor. Not sure why he chose Kansas City for his vacation destinations but he did, and he went, and he got full blown pneumonia, went septic and died. he was a direct admit to the unit. Totally preventable. He was in his 50's as I recall.

Humanoidlaws
05-06-2014, 09:21 PM
Keep your mind active. My grandmother has been playing Bridge nearly all her adult life and she still has an amazing memory. She is 85 now.

beachguy498
05-07-2014, 05:27 AM
Look around the next time you have the pleasure of visiting someone in a nursing home. What do you largely see? People who let themselves slide into the abyss. You have those that are on oxygen 24/7 due to the damage from smoking for 50 years. Nobody has exercised at all in their past 20 years, there's nothing left of them. Some have some sort of semi-fatal slow disease eating away at them, CHF, diabetes, emphysema and so on.

Economically they are there because they most likely have no money for assisted living (there are many levels of care within that option) so they turn over any assets they may have to the state. Its really become a big business in recent years.

Fortunately most of us see this happening and are taking steps to avoid it. But for millions, its too late and the nursing home is their destiny. Seeing it first hand was a real revelation to me.

Rob