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View Full Version : Computing Brahs. What's your laptop? Need input.



Phasezaa
04-29-2014, 12:05 PM
I have to buy a new one this Summer for my upcoming computing classes and I am looking for some suggestions. Will rep any helpful post.


Hardware Requirements
The following are minimum specifications for the laptop computer a student should purchase. Many suitable
brands are available. Carefully consider service and support options as laptop maintenance is
the responsibility of the student.

Processor Intel T Series processors i5 or i7 which
supports Intel Virtualization Technology
Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 Pro or better. (This can
be obtained freely through the School’s
MSDNAA program*)
Hard Drive 250 GB or greater
RAM 4 GB minimum
Optical DVD±RW/CD-RW
Network Ethernet 10/100 or 10/100/1000 and Wireless
802.11g/n
Cabling Ethernet patch cable

Phasezaa
04-29-2014, 01:58 PM
Bump

BennyJr169
04-29-2014, 02:04 PM
Why do you need a laptop?

MiscMathematician
04-29-2014, 02:36 PM
T-series CPUs are not put into laptops as far as I can find, they're low-power desktop CPUs.

If you'e using it for heavy computations an i7-xxxMQ would be best (maybe overkill),

What's your budget anyway?

Phasezaa
04-29-2014, 02:50 PM
T-series CPUs are not put into laptops as far as I can find, they're low-power desktop CPUs.

If you'e using it for heavy computations an i7-xxxMQ would be best (maybe overkill),

What's your budget anyway?

Trying to not to spend more then $1000, but the cheaper the better, as long as it meets the requirements. I already have a MacBook Pro but my college computing program requires windows laptops and I'm switching my major to information technology.

MiscMathematician
04-29-2014, 03:59 PM
Trying to not to spend more then $1000, but the cheaper the better, as long as it meets the requirements. I already have a MacBook Pro but my college computing program requires windows laptops and I'm switching my major to information technology.

For 1k and under high-performance, you'll need to stick with consumer level (i.e. lower-quality laptops, unless a slick deal comes along, of course). e.g.

http://shop.lenovo.com/us/en/laptops/lenovo/y-series/y510p/?sb=:000001C9:00010256:

There's also a $1050 version of that machine with anti-glare and bluray, as well as a smaller 14" version (Y410p) with lower-res screen

The lenovo G510 is also a possibility. It's certainly much cheaper and meets your requirements. However, it does not have dedicated graphics and a weak screen resolution. Everything else is on point

Click the yellow button "More models" to see the $650 model with the i7-4700mq
http://shop.lenovo.com/us/en/laptops/lenovo/g-series/g510/

And here's a similar HP
http://www.shopping.hp.com/en_US/home-office/-/products/Laptops/HP-ENVY/E2E34AV?HP-ENVY-15t-j100-Quad-Edition-Notebook-PC-ENERGY-STAR-&jumpid=ba_r329_hhoaffiliate&aid=38293&pbid=lw9MynSeamY&aoid=35252&siteid=lw9MynSeamY-zj1Pk_y2dz.kXvLDCIw7Cw&jumpid=ba_r329_hhoaffiliate&aid=38293&pbid=lw9MynSeamY&aoid=35252&siteid=lw9MynSeamY-JtHtsTnchW7u2kYRViScLg

mackd
04-29-2014, 04:06 PM
What model macbook pro do you have OP?
If it will suffice, just bootcamp Windows.

Phasezaa
04-30-2014, 10:10 AM
For 1k and under high-performance, you'll need to stick with consumer level (i.e. lower-quality laptops, unless a slick deal comes along, of course). e.g.....

Repped


What model macbook pro do you have OP?
If it will suffice, just bootcamp Windows.

Was interested in this and brushed it off at first. Now that I'm looking at it, my macbook meets all the requirements but I'm not a 100% sure about whether my processor would support Virtualization Technology. If I could do this I would save a bunch of money.

Heres a link to the processor in my mac. http://ark.intel.com/products/67355/intel-core-i5-3210m-processor-3m-cache-up-to-3_10-ghz-rpga

Anybody want to throw in any input. It says it supports Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) ‡ but not Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) ‡.

So am I good if I just run bootcamp? I could be saving a $1000 here. I'm on that college time. Please tell me I'm gonna be able to have more creatine money.

mackd
04-30-2014, 05:24 PM
Repped



Was interested in this and brushed it off at first. Now that I'm looking at it, my macbook meets all the requirements but I'm not a 100% sure about whether my processor would support Virtualization Technology. If I could do this I would save a bunch of money.

Heres a link to the processor in my mac. http://ark.intel.com/products/67355/intel-core-i5-3210m-processor-3m-cache-up-to-3_10-ghz-rpga

Anybody want to throw in any input. It says it supports Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) ‡ but not Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) ‡.

So am I good if I just run bootcamp? I could be saving a $1000 here. I'm on that college time. Please tell me I'm gonna be able to have more creatine money.


To me it looks like it wont be a problem., the processor posted supports Virtualization Technology, the Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) that it doesn't support is just some extra capabilities (which in your case is most likely unnecessary)
This is an outline of what it does and what its needed for:

http://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2009/06/25/understanding-vt-d-intel-virtualization-technology-for-directed-io
And i really doubt that'd be an issue, it offers 4 very very specific features in relation to virtualization technology.

Bootcamp w/ windows is an incredibly easy process(especially that you can get Windows 7/8 for FREE), i did it on my girlfriends mac book and it was very straightforward.

Worse case scenario, down the track you can always go out and buy another laptop, most likely scenario is you'll save 1k and the macbook pro will be more than suitable.

Phasezaa
04-30-2014, 05:38 PM
To me it looks like it wont be a problem., the processor posted supports Virtualization Technology, the Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) that it doesn't support is just some extra capabilities (which in your case is most likely unnecessary)
This is an outline of what it does and what its needed for:

http://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2009/06/25/understanding-vt-d-intel-virtualization-technology-for-directed-io
And i really doubt that'd be an issue, it offers 4 very very specific features in relation to virtualization technology.

Bootcamp w/ windows is an incredibly easy process(especially that you can get Windows 7/8 for FREE), i did it on my girlfriends mac book and it was very straightforward.

Worse case scenario, down the track you can always go out and buy another laptop, most likely scenario is you'll save 1k and the macbook pro will be more than suitable.

Yeah I just saved 1k thanks to you guys. Emailed a future professor of mine that I have an ITE class with in the Fall and she said she ran it by faculty of the IT department. They all agreed it would be sufficient for my courses, even the upper level ones. So happy right now. Repped!

gswarrior510
04-30-2014, 08:02 PM
you dont need anything special, you can go through the entire CS degree with a macbook no problem

whosthis
04-30-2014, 08:10 PM
If you can get Windows for free through the school just get that and bootcamp it on your macbook. Cheapest option available in your situation.

seanb1979
05-01-2014, 12:46 AM
lenovo makes pretty damn good laptops

BrokeBrahMtn
05-01-2014, 01:04 AM
you dont need anything special, you can go through the entire CS degree with a macbook no problem

This.
Some commands are different but it's mostly the same
You have to use different programs as well

lsiberian
05-01-2014, 07:52 AM
Just remember to start your programming labs the moment they are assigned. Don't wait till they are due.

ispy
05-01-2014, 11:03 AM
if your macbook's hard drive is a decent size (250gigs+), then you can just partition it, get a free copy of windows through your school, and install it on bootcamp. it will work the exact same way as a windows laptop.