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View Full Version : STEM brahs, what's your salarly looking like?



dasitbrah999
04-20-2014, 08:29 PM
ITT your salary, degree and job (if not too personal)
Wanna know what other STEM brahs are doing

MURedHawk235
04-20-2014, 08:40 PM
me
degree: masters in zoology
job: neurophysiologists (doing market research)
salary: over 40k

my wife
degree: bachelors in MIS (management information systems)
job: Big data analyst
salary: over 80k

morale of the story do something with data analysis and don't do anything in science

NotoriousSRJ
04-20-2014, 08:57 PM
me
degree: masters in zoology
job: neurophysiologists (doing market research)
salary: over 40k

my wife
degree: bachelors in MIS (management information systems)
job: Big data analyst
salary: over 80k

morale of the story do something with data analysis and don't do anything in science

This. Stay away from STEM (engineering excepted) unless you're looking at doing grad school.

arman24
04-20-2014, 10:34 PM
About to go into learning to become a registered nurse. As of right now my goals are to get a ADN not a BSN but we'll see how everything goes.

eyebrowbrah
04-20-2014, 11:27 PM
Degree: neurobio
Job: none
Salary: none

brb crying to sleep at night

Smithers115
04-21-2014, 01:29 AM
Kinesiology

salary: in school

future salary: if i get into physio school great of not Im going to make bank with reforestation in BC

LordBroski
04-21-2014, 01:50 AM
This. Stay away from STEM (engineering excepted) unless you're looking at doing grad school.

Engineering here is pretty fuked. Hard to find work and starting salaries are low.

Great time to be a geologist though. Plenty of jobs in the mining industry.

Tiaker
04-21-2014, 05:54 AM
me
degree: Mechanical Engineering

I graduate in the fall (Had to take one semester off because I found out I had CML), but I have a few job offers that look to be in the $80k range.

Bcider
04-21-2014, 06:34 AM
Mechanical Engineering
2 years out making about 60k.

Most of my Engineering friends from school making 50-70k. Unless you have a masters and get into some really niche field or work in oil in a high demand area like Alberta CN, don't expect to making the really big bucks. From what the older guys tell me, it is essential to rise the ranks in a company if you wan't to make a substantial amount. There are plenty of 20-30 year guys who didn't have the personality or didn't brownnose enough to move up and hate their lives haha. I hear it from these guys everyday and how they wish they went into a different field and engineering sucks etc.

MURedHawk235
04-21-2014, 07:35 AM
This. Stay away from STEM (engineering excepted) unless you're looking at doing grad school.

The main thing that annoys me when I was doing the job search was that with a masters a lot of research positions are considered entry level...which is BS. I had done three years of undergraduate research, as in heading my own projects with 3 undergrads working under me as if I was already a graduate student and it essentially counts for nothing haha.

After I finally finished my thesis work the prof I did research for (who is a miserable person to begin with) offered me a position when I was done and tried to pay me essentially a fraction of what I was worth when they knew full well that they needed me if they wanted to get a paper publish. She was trying to say 14 dollars an hour was good for my experience level.....okay.jpg

Shoester
04-21-2014, 08:18 AM
I don't think Construction Management qualifies, although it is related.

$64k

eXistenceLies
04-21-2014, 08:25 AM
Degree: None. Roughly 50 hours into my 2 years though I never finished.
Job: Electrical Designer
Salary: over $70K

cheesecake93
04-21-2014, 08:51 AM
while we're at it, opinions on CS vs CS Engineering degrees?

bartosh
04-21-2014, 09:05 AM
me
degree: masters in zoology
job: neurophysiologists (doing market research)
salary: over 40k

my wife
degree: bachelors in MIS (management information systems)
job: Big data analyst
salary: over 80k

morale of the story do something with data analysis and don't do anything in science

Including computer science?

MURedHawk235
04-21-2014, 09:12 AM
Including computer science?

no i meant the sciences like biology, ecology, etc

iCAMETOPLAY
04-21-2014, 09:16 AM
'Tis indeed a sad day when hard sciences like Mathematics, physics and Chemistry are overlooked for other 'softer' sciences like Engineering, computer scientists.

I'm not knocking the latter they're hard and are of course more vocational, but in my world I'd always give priority to Mathes/Physics/Chemists and train them for my specific role as these are actual degrees without which the other subjects would be nothing. Especially Maths/Physics as it's due to them Engineer and computer science is a discipline in the first place.

I guess most employers are impatient phaggots, **** employers, gotta get out of that 9-5 grind ASAP.

Bcider
04-21-2014, 09:18 AM
In general STEM degrees are more useful than liberal arts degrees but its not CEO 10k a day like most highschool/freshman in college miscers will try to make you believe. It is much easier to land a job but you still have to put effort into it and network if you want something good. I know a few guys who took pretty lowball 40k jobs as engineers because they couldn't find something else. I also have a friend making 100k+ in a startup company because he is a computer science wiz.

Not to put anyone down or anything but I've heard horror stories of STEM degrees such as biology, chemistry, physics, math, and even computer science. I know for a fact how hard some of these degrees can be but the job market for them is not amazing. I personally believe Physics is a billion times harder as a degree than my Mechanical Engineering degree.

Where you go to school is a huge factor coming into the job force at an entry level. I know for a fact that my boss tosses any resumes from "lesser" schools as he calls them.

moonrakerelite
04-21-2014, 09:25 AM
Engineering here is pretty fuked. Hard to find work and starting salaries are low.

Great time to be a geologist though. Plenty of jobs in the mining industry.

Are they in dire need? I'm in the environmental side atm and it sucks booty...I wanted to get into mining/exploration but the requirements were so ridiculous...0 entry level opportunities, everything was senior mine engineer 15 plus years experience. I didn't look in to any out of country work though...got any company names or general info?

stardawg
04-21-2014, 09:32 AM
Including computer science?

Compsci isn;t the golden ticket a lot of people make it out to be

lsiberian
04-21-2014, 12:16 PM
Compsci isn;t the golden ticket a lot of people make it out to be

Unless you are actually good at it.

MiscMathematician
04-21-2014, 12:18 PM
28k lol, but only part-time instructor. looking for real work next fall

Purplekoolaid
04-21-2014, 12:46 PM
degree: M.S. in Mech Eng (just straight 6 years of schooling)
job: reliability engineer / project engineer
salary: 86k/year - start may 19

TheWaffleIron
04-21-2014, 12:55 PM
Degree: BA, molecular biology and chemistry
Job: Lab tech, biochemistry and molecular/cellular biology research group
Salary: $35k/yr

Starting PhD in biochemistry in the fall, $29k/yr stipend.

PumkinPie
04-21-2014, 02:03 PM
Comp Eng - 90k

jinda628
04-21-2014, 03:45 PM
Degree: Civil Engineering
Profession: Planning/Scheduling Engr.
Salary: 100k+ (But I've been working since 1997 and have worked abroad)

Salaries wont be the same even for similar or same degree. It depends on specializations and experience.
A civil eng'g gradute can be a structural or highway designer, cost eng'r, contracts administrator, quality control, project engineer, planner/scheduler and still they can have varying salary levels.

It also depends on where you are employed, whether by the client, the consultant or the contractor.

Nara62629
04-21-2014, 04:23 PM
BS civil engineering

Started at 54k as a field engineer.

Year later 70k.

Another year...Just accepted an offer with another company as a project engineer at 72k.

InstantLoser
04-21-2014, 04:33 PM
Network Compliance Analyst I - $56k. Started here 4 years ago @ $14/hour.

Just have an Associates in Computer Science, Net+ and HDI certs.

borntocount
04-21-2014, 05:31 PM
Pharmacist > $120,000 per year

BUT

4 years out of workforce while in school after bachelors and 15% extra tax on income when you take into account IBR student loan payments for about 15 years payoff projection.

borntocount
04-21-2014, 05:36 PM
In general STEM degrees are more useful than liberal arts degrees but its not CEO 10k a day like most highschool/freshman in college miscers will try to make you believe. It is much easier to land a job but you still have to put effort into it and network if you want something good. I know a few guys who took pretty lowball 40k jobs as engineers because they couldn't find something else. I also have a friend making 100k+ in a startup company because he is a computer science wiz.

Not to put anyone down or anything but I've heard horror stories of STEM degrees such as biology, chemistry, physics, math, and even computer science. I know for a fact how hard some of these degrees can be but the job market for them is not amazing. I personally believe Physics is a billion times harder as a degree than my Mechanical Engineering degree.

Where you go to school is a huge factor coming into the job force at an entry level. I know for a fact that my boss tosses any resumes from "lesser" schools as he calls them.

I totally agree. Out of undergrad majoring in Bio, I had zero job offers even after working my butt off to get top tier grades. It worked out okay for me, since my aim was health professional school...but definitely would advice students to choose something you like where you are passionate enough to do internships and whatnot.

The school names really do matter because they do have a role in helping you land the internships. Work as hard on your internships as you do on your grades.

Comboking
04-21-2014, 05:36 PM
degree: bachelors of miscology
job: quality misc poster
salary: 350k, a day

Otaman
04-21-2014, 05:46 PM
degree: bachelors of miscology
job: Xbox one Misc representative
salary: 350k, a day


fixed

Comboking
04-21-2014, 05:55 PM
fixed

ty men

ichthis
04-21-2014, 06:46 PM
Overall I would say that having a terminal degree in any field generally trumps a Bachelor's in STEM. After all, a 4-year STEM degree is proof you can think decently, but the higher end (100K+) jobs of all types often have their pick of the litter, so it's hard to compete. So unless you are planning on doing graduate work in STEM, I would think long and hard about going down that road, because many people end up miserable because they were chasing dollars and not a pursuit they actually enjoyed in any fundamental way.

SeanBrah56
04-21-2014, 07:47 PM
Degree: AAS in Computer Science and Networking Technology (in a few more weeks, this is my last semester)

A+, Net+ certified. Looking at getting my MCSA in Windows 7/Server 2008 over the summer.

Position: Tier 1 (entry level) Systems Administrator for a manufacturing company based out of Ohio (once I graduate, got the job offer waiting for me)

Salary: Depending on negotiations and performance, anywhere from 48-55k

keep in mind that's an entry level spot. Tier 2 and 3's make a LOT more money. My brother is a Tier 2 Systems Admin and cleared 100k last year. He started his own LLC this year.

tdnick
04-21-2014, 07:53 PM
degree: bachelors of miscology
job: quality misc poster
salary: 350k, a day

I call bs on the job. They must be desperate if you got hired

mkx1775
04-21-2014, 08:04 PM
Electrical Engineering brah checking in. In my junior year I was offered a job during my internship with Con Edison to work in a power plant in NY, they also offered to pay the rest of my senior year tuition if I had signed with them. Starting salary would have been $80k. I would have taken it but I already had a scholarship and obligation with the US Navy to be commissioned after graduation. I make $50k or so in the Navy not counting medical/dental and other benefits.

jmonty
04-21-2014, 08:17 PM
. I make $50k or so in the Navy not counting medical/dental and other benefits.

Housing and food allowances count as pay IMO, just not taxable

Destor
04-21-2014, 08:35 PM
Not a degree but Construction Engineering Tech, 2-year diploma program

Took an offer for 60k starting this May. Probably could have held out for 65-70k from smaller companies but determined this position is the best opportunity overall.

GreenMintTea
04-21-2014, 09:05 PM
Degree: BA, molecular biology and chemistry
Job: Lab tech, biochemistry and molecular/cellular biology research group
Salary: $35k/yr

Starting PhD in biochemistry in the fall, $29k/yr stipend.

That's the chit right there. People will laugh at only 29K/year, but that's 29K/year to fuking study (what you love) and actually be recognized for it. Sounds alright to me.