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HarvardMan53
04-19-2014, 07:28 PM
Harvard

yettiatcpg
04-19-2014, 07:59 PM
why is that? the reason I ask is my son got a letter from them about getting an endowment for up to 70% of his schooling. I wondered how much else it would cost to go to a place like that?

Iceman1800
04-19-2014, 08:03 PM
You can stop now.

HarvardMan53
04-19-2014, 08:08 PM
You can stop now.

What was it like to get rejected by Harvard?

Boostronics
04-19-2014, 08:10 PM
Post your credentials phaggot

DocHoss
04-19-2014, 09:33 PM
What was it like to get rejected by Harvard?
Wouldn't know - Harvard was my safety. Though I will admit that in the end I had some hesitation before turning it down. You help to affirm my decision.

superman713
04-20-2014, 06:50 PM
What was it like to get rejected by Harvard?

I rejected Harvard... Yale.




























you mad bro?

DocHoss
04-20-2014, 08:46 PM
I rejected Harvard... Yale.





























you mad bro?
Gee, did anyone actually accept Harvard? :D

drudixon
04-21-2014, 04:21 AM
Most graduates of the ivy leagues don't show a positive ROI, ever.

Karl_Hungus
04-21-2014, 10:41 AM
Most graduates of the ivy leagues don't show a positive ROI, ever.

Unless you go to grad school and get your tuition remitted. I did that, but still accumulated a good deal of debt trying to survive on their crappy stipend.

DocHoss
04-21-2014, 02:27 PM
Most graduates of the ivy leagues don't show a positive ROI, ever.
I find that hard to believe. Though many go on to careers in academic research or teaching, which does not pay particularly well. The ROI of any institution probably depends a lot on the career choices of its graduates.

I feel there is more to education than a just a financial investment with the expectation of a financial return. If that is the prime consideration, than maybe business college is a better choice than university. I think that a lot of the for-profit business colleges leave their graduates buried under debt.

Most students at the Ivy League are on financial aid, however, so they aren't paying retail. Those that do pay full price probably don't really care about ROI. I don't know about Harvard (though the Ivy League tends to copy each other so that prospective students choose based on where they want to go, not based on their financial situation), but Princeton switched to entirely grant-based financial aid so, in theory, students graduate with zero debt.

The real problem is that too many people see the big-name universities as the key to success- and bragging rights. The Ivy League provides great opportunities, but success will be based more on the individual's ability, perseverance, and drive. I know several people who started out in community colleges and have gone on to very successful careers.

It's kind of like lifting: a big fancy gym won't necessarily give you better results than the Y or a decent home gym. The bulk of your success is up to YOU.

jeffaus
04-22-2014, 07:38 AM
I find that hard to believe. Though many go on to careers in academic research or teaching, which does not pay particularly well. The ROI of any institution probably depends a lot on the career choices of its graduates.

I feel there is more to education than a just a financial investment with the expectation of a financial return. If that is the prime consideration, than maybe business college is a better choice than university. I think that a lot of the for-profit business colleges leave their graduates buried under debt.

Most students at the Ivy League are on financial aid, however, so they aren't paying retail. Those that do pay full price probably don't really care about ROI. I don't know about Harvard (though the Ivy League tends to copy each other so that prospective students choose based on where they want to go, not based on their financial situation), but Princeton switched to entirely grant-based financial aid so, in theory, students graduate with zero debt.

The real problem is that too many people see the big-name universities as the key to success- and bragging rights. The Ivy League provides great opportunities, but success will be based more on the individual's ability, perseverance, and drive. I know several people who started out in community colleges and have gone on to very successful careers.

It's kind of like lifting: a big fancy gym won't necessarily give you better results than the Y or a decent home gym. The bulk of your success is up to YOU.You could see by all the Op's posts that he is not capable of putting more than 2 or 3 words together in one sentence. A great advertisement for Harvard, wouldn't you say?

Bandingo
04-27-2014, 10:10 AM
I find that hard to believe. Though many go on to careers in academic research or teaching, which does not pay particularly well. The ROI of any institution probably depends a lot on the career choices of its graduates.

I feel there is more to education than a just a financial investment with the expectation of a financial return. If that is the prime consideration, than maybe business college is a better choice than university. I think that a lot of the for-profit business colleges leave their graduates buried under debt.

Most students at the Ivy League are on financial aid, however, so they aren't paying retail. Those that do pay full price probably don't really care about ROI. I don't know about Harvard (though the Ivy League tends to copy each other so that prospective students choose based on where they want to go, not based on their financial situation), but Princeton switched to entirely grant-based financial aid so, in theory, students graduate with zero debt.

The real problem is that too many people see the big-name universities as the key to success- and bragging rights. The Ivy League provides great opportunities, but success will be based more on the individual's ability, perseverance, and drive. I know several people who started out in community colleges and have gone on to very successful careers.

It's kind of like lifting: a big fancy gym won't necessarily give you better results than the Y or a decent home gym. The bulk of your success is up to YOU.


You speak the truth. I would also venture to say that the success of many graduates of prestige universities has more to do with their inherent ability as opposed to what they learned at their university. The people who can get accepted to those schools tend to be bright and hard working. They would succeed anywhere.

WonderPug
04-27-2014, 10:31 AM
Most graduates of the ivy leagues don't show a positive ROI, ever.The ones who capitalize Ivy League...do ;)




You speak the truth. I would also venture to say that the success of many graduates of prestige universities has more to do with their inherent ability as opposed to what they learned at their university. The people who can get accepted to those schools tend to be bright and hard working. They would succeed anywhere.I strongly agree.

Brackneyc
04-27-2014, 10:36 AM
Most graduates of the ivy leagues don't show a positive ROI, ever.

Depends on their goals I suppose. If your goal is to have a career you love, the ROI may not come by way of money...in the short term anyway. If your goal in life is to make lots of money, it can be done with no formal education if the person is willing to do work they do not necessarily love or even enjoy. Precious few can do something over the long haul (and do it well) if they do not like it.

cowboybiker
04-27-2014, 11:57 AM
Wassamotta U. Is better

GuyJin
04-27-2014, 03:35 PM
Wassamotta U. Is better
---

You must have gone to Camp Kitcheegoomeenooneewawa.

Tmax55
04-27-2014, 04:39 PM
Harvard and places like it are where neurotic students go because they have arrived. Then they spend four years with others just like them sitting around in their grade inflated classrooms telling each other how smart they are, while learning very little new information. Then they go into government where all the "really smart people" are employed (note that I did not say "work") and proceed to **** things up for the rest of us because they are so lacking in common sense that they probably could not get their car out of their garage in a power outage .

Brackneyc
04-27-2014, 04:56 PM
Harvard and places like it are where neurotic students go because they have arrived. Then they spend four years with others just like them sitting around in their grade inflated classrooms telling each other how smart they are, while learning very little new information. Then they go into government where all the "really smart people" are employed (note that I did not say "work") and proceed to **** things up for the rest of us because they are so lacking in common sense that they probably could not get their car out of their garage in a power outage .

Kind of a broad stroke, don't you think. I'd venture a guess that most guys know few, if anyone that has gone to Harvard.

so-tex
04-27-2014, 05:37 PM
Kind of a broad stroke, don't you think. I'd venture a guess that most guys know few, if anyone that has gone to Harvard.Agreed. I graduated from a small, podunk university that espouses the same liberal views as most universities. One needs to wade through the BS, reluctantly agree with your professor in order to get a passing grade and move on. Sadly, there are those that get caught up and actually get a 'hard on'.

Tmax55
04-27-2014, 05:51 PM
I know five people who went to Harvard. Four work in govt and one in business.

Brackneyc
04-27-2014, 06:12 PM
I know five people who went to Harvard. Four work in govt and one in business.


Well, at least they are all working. I have worked with a few guys who went to Ivy League schools. Just regular guys as far as I could tell. Anyone can be a government worker BTW.

cowboybiker
04-27-2014, 07:04 PM
---

You must have gone to Camp Kitcheegoomeenooneewawa.http://www.suprmchaos.com/wossamotta-u3_mam.jpg

Tmax55
04-28-2014, 06:33 PM
Well, at least they are all working. I have worked with a few guys who went to Ivy League schools. Just regular guys as far as I could tell. Anyone can be a government worker BTW.

I'm horribly biased against government. I just don't think it does anything very efficiently thus I could never be in government unless I was elected to shrink it.

Brackneyc
04-28-2014, 06:37 PM
I'm horribly biased against government. I just don't think it does anything very efficiently thus I could never be in government unless I was elected to shrink it.


Government never shrinks, at least not in areas where it is needed most. It just keeps growing and growing. Problem is, it is tolerated, and grown by the voters.

We the people....are lazy and apathetic.

Brackneyc
04-28-2014, 06:50 PM
The Canadians actually managed it.i am not sure how, but they did it to a remarkably significant degree.


And they managed to increase the incomes of their middle class beyond those of their US neighbors.

As far as making the government smaller, I'd love to see it. Afraid that ship has sailed. Too many people want those jobs for them to ever go away.

mcbourque
04-28-2014, 07:02 PM
And they managed to increase the incomes of their middle class beyond those of their US neighbors.

Canadian immigrated to the US here..

The biggest difference I saw moving to the US was the presence of the super über rich. A woman who trained at the gym I worked possessed about 75 cars which sat in a mansion size garage. The entire coast of the small town I lived in (in RI) is a series of sprawling mansion with private beach. That woman's "job" was to go to charity balls. That kind of money just doesn't exist in CND.

I had never ever imagined that someone could own 75 cars.

(I also saw the presence of the super uber poor when we took the wrong turn in Providence. Again never seen anything like it in CND.)

Rich people are taxed more heavily in CND.

Dr.Griefo
04-28-2014, 09:16 PM
I'm horribly biased against government. I just don't think it does anything very efficiently thus I could never be in government unless I was elected to shrink it.

http://www.ijreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/ron-swanson-advice-1024x579.jpeg?437a59

Karl_Hungus
04-28-2014, 11:16 PM
Well, at least they are all working. I have worked with a few guys who went to Ivy League schools. Just regular guys as far as I could tell. Anyone can be a government worker BTW.

There are actually a lot of nice kids at Ivy League schools ... even if they are somewhat disconnected from reality in many cases. When I was a PhD student at an Ivy League school, I worked with and taught many of the undergraduates. Not surprisingly, they all came from money. Even my fellow grad students came from significantly wealthier backgrounds than I did.....except for one of the other students. She was poor like me. One thing that we both found striking was that the undergraduates loved to use the word "summer" as a verb: "Hey Courtney, where do you plan to summer? My family plans to summer in Italy this year!"

"Hey Karl, where do you plan to summer?"

Karl: In a sh!tty little apartment in a crappy neighborhood about 2 blocks from here!

Like I said ... many of them were a bit out of touch (often hilariously so), but they were good kids for the most part. They didn't fit the stereotype of little rich snobs who looked down on everyone else.

DocHoss
04-29-2014, 11:19 AM
Agreed. I graduated from a small, podunk university that espouses the same liberal views as most universities. One needs to wade through the BS, reluctantly agree with your professor in order to get a passing grade and move on. Sadly, there are those that get caught up and actually get a 'hard on'.
I feel your pain. I had a professor whose overt conservative religious and social views I believe kept me from getting high honors. I did suspiciously poorly on the subjective part of his course even though I aced the objective parts. Nothing one can do but accept and move on.

I may have had less of that than you since I was in science: no matter what your political or religious views on gravity, if you lift both feet off the ground, you're going to fall on your ass.



The biggest difference I saw moving to the US was the presence of the super über rich. A woman who trained at the gym I worked possessed about 75 cars which sat in a mansion size garage. The entire coast of the small town I lived in (in RI) is a series of sprawling mansion with private beach. That woman's "job" was to go to charity balls. That kind of money just doesn't exist in CND.

Must have been Newport, home of the fabulous Pewterschmidts. Pretty mind-boggling. But the hotel there had one of the two best hotel gyms I've encountered.


There are actually a lot of nice kids at Ivy League schools ... even if they are somewhat disconnected from reality in many cases. When I was a PhD student at an Ivy League school, I worked with and taught many of the undergraduates. Not surprisingly, they all came from money. Even my fellow grad students came from significantly wealthier backgrounds than I did.....except for one of the other students. She was poor like me. One thing that we both found striking was that the undergraduates loved to use the word "summer" as a verb: "Hey Courtney, where do you plan to summer? My family plans to summer in Italy this year!"

"Hey Karl, where do you plan to summer?"

Karl: In a sh!tty little apartment in a crappy neighborhood about 2 blocks from here!

Like I said ... many of them were a bit out of touch (often hilariously so), but they were good kids for the most part. They didn't fit the stereotype of little rich snobs who looked down on everyone else.
You must have hung out with a different crowd (or as TA, forced to associate with them) because I don't ever remember hearing "summer" used as a verb!

I worked my way through college and admit a bit of envy at those who could afford to spend their time studying or having fun (I had some of both, so don't cry for me), not to mention those who had a car and could go places. I flew out with a one-way ticket (good old World Airways) since we didn't have money for a round-trip. But in the end, I graduated with $2000 in loan debt, $4000 in the bank from working the dining halls, and my parents did not have to pay one dime. Better yet, a year later the university sent me $1200 because I lived off campus and my expected contribution was offset by by a credit for room and board.

Karl_Hungus
04-29-2014, 12:42 PM
You must have hung out with a different crowd (or as TA, forced to associate with them) because I don't ever remember hearing "summer" used as a verb!


LOL ... yeah, the undergrads I was mainly exposed to were those who worked closely with us in our lab. I got to know them all really well and I even keep in touch with some of them ... but my interactions with those I TA'd were pretty superficial. One time I went to visit one of the undergrads at her apartment. She lived on the 8th floor of a large apartment building. I asked her how much her rent was. Her reply? "I don't pay rent, because my dad owns the building". Those kind of experiences really made me realize I came from a very different world than most of them.


I worked my way through college and admit a bit of envy at those who could afford to spend their time studying or having fun (I had some of both, so don't cry for me), not to mention those who had a car and could go places. I flew out with a one-way ticket (good old World Airways) since we didn't have money for a round-trip. But in the end, I graduated with $2000 in loan debt, $4000 in the bank from working the dining halls, and my parents did not have to pay one dime. Better yet, a year later the university sent me $1200 because I lived off campus and my expected contribution was offset by by a credit for room and board.

Yup, I had to work my way through undergrad too and entered grad school with no debt. In grad school, we weren't allowed to have jobs. Fortunately, my tuition was remitted and I was given a stipend. Unfortunately, I lived in one of the most expensive cities in the country, and my stipend didn't cut it .... so I ended up with a sizable debt by the time I graduated.

DocHoss
04-29-2014, 04:13 PM
LOL ... yeah, the undergrads I was mainly exposed to were those who worked closely with us in our lab. I got to know them all really well and I even keep in touch with some of them ... but my interactions with those I TA'd were pretty superficial. One time I went to visit one of the undergrads at her apartment. She lived on the 8th floor of a large apartment building. I asked her how much her rent was. Her reply? "I don't pay rent, because my dad owns the building". Those kind of experiences really made me realize I came from a very different world than most of them.
For sure! Me too.




Yup, I had to work my way through undergrad too and entered grad school with no debt. In grad school, we weren't allowed to have jobs. Fortunately, my tuition was remitted and I was given a stipend. Unfortunately, I lived in one of the most expensive cities in the country, and my stipend didn't cut it .... so I ended up with a sizable debt by the time I graduated.
I lived in a tent. Finished with no debt. :)