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View Full Version : Anyone with heart condition/understanding need your input.



bodyhard
04-18-2014, 09:26 AM
As most here know my wife was diagnosed with a clogged artery and fortunately for her, she did not need a stint (sp) put in. They are taking care of it with medication.

However, Patty still gets the pain, when she walks long distance, gets anxiety or stressed and she has this pill she is suppose to put under her tongue when the pain is too much, thus far she has only used it once.

With that said, why would the doc clear her for exercise?

I am curious, if she can't catch a heart attack (the doc said it is very unlikely that she would) then what is the pain she is experiencing?

My wife is going to a second cardiologist for a second opinion, but I am curious and thought maybe someone here (who has had heart issues) might shed some light on it.


Thanking you in advance.

john-t-b
04-18-2014, 09:43 AM
BH
Read this before your wife does I don't want her to be scared.

I had two heart attacks before I had my triple bypass.

I was told by the surgeon before the surgery. "That black spot is dead tissue in your heart. That was your first heart attack. That spot there was your second heart attack. The 70% clog right there is your third and you won't live through it."


A heart attack is 100% clog in an artery.

So if they treating it with meds thats a good thing. Still good to go for a second opinion though. I would not suggest exercise until after the second opinion. My original DR told me to get on the treadmill and if i did that i wouldn't be here today.

He probably cleared her for exercise so she strengthens her heart (muscle) and gets the blood flowing better.
That's just a guess on my part though. It is a very stressful thing to go through and I can relate.

Start her off slow and make sure she listens to her body when exercising.

If you look at my signature below that was three years after my surgery. If that's any reassurance to her.

Tell her to relax and it will be fine even in the worst case she will still be ok.

scullin
04-18-2014, 10:02 AM
Not sure but my wife had some similar problems last year. Found out she had an undiagnosed heart defect. She ended up getting a defibulator put in. She wasn't allowed to exercise for a while either after the surgery. I'm not sure about now though, it's been a few months. We're seperated so I don't really know the status now but she hasn't been complaining about it lately so I'm guessing it worked out.

bodyhard
04-18-2014, 02:11 PM
Thanks guys for the input, but can anyone tell me what is the pain she is experiencing?

According to the doctor, he says it is her muscle pushing up against the clogged artery whenever she gets stressed/anxiety.

But does that make sense? Will it eventually lead to a heart attack?

Please excuse my ignorance on the subject but until she gets a second opinion I am baffled by his response.

john-t-b
04-18-2014, 03:38 PM
Thanks guys for the input, but can anyone tell me what is the pain she is experiencing?

According to the doctor, he says it is her muscle pushing up against the clogged artery whenever she gets stressed/anxiety.

The clog is plaque buildup in the artery so it is solid and may be hurting as the heart pumps. Then as her heart beats faster it's more pronounced and is causing more noticable pain.



But does that make sense? Will it eventually lead to a heart attack?

Please excuse my ignorance on the subject but until she gets a second opinion I am baffled by his response.

If you think about the artery (vein with thicker walls for pumping blood out to the body). As the clog (plaque build up) builds on the wall it makes the wall stiffer which in itself can cause pain. It restricts the blood flow out and raises the blood pressure causing stress on the heart. (It's like sticking your thumb over the end of a garden hose and increasing the pressure coming out at the same time you can feel the pressure building on the wall of the hose.)

As far as a heart attack goes the plaque build up would have to completely block off the artery in the heart. So if they caught it and are treating it then it will most likely not lead to a heart attack.

But a question for you is how did they diagnose her? Stress test or heart catherization?

If she didn't have either of these and they are saying it's clogged arteries definitely get that second opinion. If they did an EKG it could be wrong or misread because if one of the leads was in the wrong place it will not look right when they read it. I had this happen to me and the original DR passed it off as a misplaced lead and there was nothing wrong with me.

Hope this helped you out a little.

bodyhard
04-18-2014, 03:51 PM
The clog is plaque buildup in the artery so it is solid and may be hurting as the heart pumps. Then as her heart beats faster it's more pronounced and is causing more noticable pain.




If you think about the artery (vein with thicker walls for pumping blood out to the body). As the clog (plaque build up) builds on the wall it makes the wall stiffer which in itself can cause pain. It restricts the blood flow out and raises the blood pressure causing stress on the heart. (It's like sticking your thumb over the end of a garden hose and increasing the pressure coming out at the same time you can feel the pressure building on the wall of the hose.)

As far as a heart attack goes the plaque build up would have to completely block off the artery in the heart. So if they caught it and are treating it then it will most likely not lead to a heart attack.

But a question for you is how did they diagnose her? Stress test or heart catherization?

If she didn't have either of these and they are saying it's clogged arteries definitely get that second opinion. If they did an EKG it could be wrong or misread because if one of the leads was in the wrong place it will not look right when they read it. I had this happen to me and the original DR passed it off as a misplaced lead and there was nothing wrong with me.

Hope this helped you out a little.

Thanks for the clarification.

Here are the test they did in this order

First they did an EKG, found a "drop" and the doc said it seem minor but since my wife never had an EKG they did not have anything to base it on so they took blood and urine.

They cam back negative which was a good sign but they scheduled her for a stress test due to the "drop" in the EKG.

During the stress test within 4 minutes she experienced the pain, they gave her a pill to put under her tongue then scheduled her for a catherization to know for sure what was going on.

After the catherization the diagnose was 1 clogged artery roughly 40%, which they said could be taken care of with medication and no need for a stint, which is where we are at now.

She takes 2 pills (I have no idea the names) 1 for cholesterol (although she doesn't have high cholesterol) 1 to reduce the pain 24 hours and then the one she has to carry with her at all times if the pain becomes unbearable. She also takes baby aspirin.

john-t-b
04-18-2014, 05:12 PM
Thanks for the clarification.

Here are the test they did in this order

First they did an EKG, found a "drop" and the doc said it seem minor but since my wife never had an EKG they did not have anything to base it on so they took blood and urine.

They cam back negative which was a good sign but they scheduled her for a stress test due to the "drop" in the EKG.

During the stress test within 4 minutes she experienced the pain, they gave her a pill to put under her tongue then scheduled her for a catherization to know for sure what was going on.

After the catherization the diagnose was 1 clogged artery roughly 40%, which they said could be taken care of with medication and no need for a stint, which is where we are at now.

She takes 2 pills (I have no idea the names) 1 for cholesterol (although she doesn't have high cholesterol) 1 to reduce the pain 24 hours and then the one she has to carry with her at all times if the pain becomes unbearable. She also takes baby aspirin.

BH
If the 40% clog is all they found that's not as bad as it could be.
The baby aspirin thins the blood to reduce blood pressure as far as I know. I do the same.
Cholesterol is what causes the clogs (plaque) although in her case it may be hereditary. There's a bunch of different meds for that. Just read all the side affects and pay attention to them.
If she takes Niaspan be prepared and don't run out. The first week or two from the middle of your back to the top of your head you will feel like you are on fire and you will turn bright red. It will take a week or so to make that go away but it does go away. Just don't miss any doses or it starts all over.

Pain tolerance is different for everyone so she is catching the signs early and that's good.

I've taken plenty of med's that didn't agree with me at all.

I'm going to try to PM you something to help her relax her.

I tried PM'ing you but I couldn't for some reason. If you want to PM me I'll try to respond.

Bando
04-18-2014, 07:29 PM
She takes 2 pills (I have no idea the names) 1 for cholesterol (although she doesn't have high cholesterol)

This would concern me, those mess up your liver pretty good. I won't say more here since discussion of prescription medication is not allowed on this forum.

Karl_Hungus
04-18-2014, 10:59 PM
This would concern me, those mess up your liver pretty good. I won't say more here since discussion of prescription medication is not allowed on this forum.

Doctors are supposed to do blood tests to make sure your liver is OK....(not that they always do).

trickyB
04-19-2014, 06:11 AM
BH- You have lots of questions and should really see a doctor with your wife. Many of these questions can be answered by her primary care physician. In addition she may need further work up of her pain.

I'm willing to bet that nearly all of the O35 has some degree of coronary artery disease (blockage in the arteries that supply blood to the heart). In fact I believe there was a study done on the hearts of many of the boys that were killed during Vietnam that showed some plaque formation at that early age. Point is her blockage wasn't fixed because it didn't need to be. Medical management (medications and healthy lifestyle) has been show to cause plaque regression and improved plaque stability without the risks of stenting.

A heart attack is caused by plaque rupture. If the plaque ruptures the blood vessel lining of the arteries is exposed to clotting factors and platelets in the blood resulting in blood clot formation and blockage of the artery. The heart has a high demand for oxygen and the areas that go without blood may die. Depending on the location and how much of the heart is affected will affect the outcome.

The statin medication is to help with plaque stability and regression if she is lucky. The baby aspirin will prevent platelets from sticking and in the event of plaque rupture keep her for clotting off her artery supplying the heart. The medicine she puts under her tongue is nitroglycerin. It can dilate the blood vessels feeding her heart and give her heart more oxygen. Chest pain is often the result of increase demand of the heart for more blood/oxygen than it is getting.

This just some basic information, it is oversimplified and not complete. It is not medical advice or meant to be taken as such. You both need to see a doctor you trust who has all of her health history, physical exam results, lab data and study results etc to get your questions answered so you can formulate a plan together. Best of luck.

V-240
04-19-2014, 03:47 PM
I'm guessing the pills she puts under her tongue for pain are nitroglycerine tabs. They're for angina, aka chest pains. They dilate the arteries and open up blood flow, and it's a quick pain relief. I used to carry the little pills around as a precaution but never needed them as a treadmill stress test indicated my ticker was fine.

We need a real doc or nurse to answer here, not me! :cool:

superman713
04-20-2014, 08:38 PM
definitely get a second or third opinion... My father a few years ago after already having 2 heart attacks was having pain and his cardiologist said everything was fine after running tests and a couple of office visits. He was still experiencing pain and decided to trust his doctor. He hurt his back at work and went to a PT that did an Xray and it was the FUKING PHYSICAL THERAPIST that caught the aneurism on his Aorta. The PT called ahead to the hospital and said that he was sending my father over. He went in for emergency surgery that night. The aneurism was way past the point that it should have burst. The doc that did the surgery said that he had never seen an aneurism that size and was shocked. If it had burst my father would have died almost instantly...

CAN NOT SAY IT OR MEAN IT ENOUGH... GET AS MANY EYES ON THE ISSUE AS POSSIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hell... go see a physical therapist.

God bless brother.

sumolgi
04-20-2014, 10:17 PM
If your Doc is competent, the fact they didn't do an angio at the time of the cath is a really good indication that they think it can be controlled with drugs. If they felt there was any need, in all likelihood they would have done it when they had her there and already prep'd and on the table, so take that as a good sign. Those things are an ezpz porsche payment with wicked good recovery stats for the doc, so if there was any justification, they probably would have gone for it on the spot.

ticklemeelbow
04-21-2014, 05:00 PM
definitely get a second or third opinion... My father a few years ago after already having 2 heart attacks was having pain and his cardiologist said everything was fine after running tests and a couple of office visits. He was still experiencing pain and decided to trust his doctor. He hurt his back at work and went to a PT that did an Xray and it was the FUKING PHYSICAL THERAPIST that caught the aneurism on his Aorta. The PT called ahead to the hospital and said that he was sending my father over. He went in for emergency surgery that night. The aneurism was way past the point that it should have burst. The doc that did the surgery said that he had never seen an aneurism that size and was shocked. If it had burst my father would have died almost instantly...

CAN NOT SAY IT OR MEAN IT ENOUGH... GET AS MANY EYES ON THE ISSUE AS POSSIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hell... go see a physical therapist.

God bless brother.crazy!

JediRN
04-22-2014, 12:11 AM
I'm guessing the pills she puts under her tongue for pain are nitroglycerine tabs. They're for angina, aka chest pains. They dilate the arteries and open up blood flow, and it's a quick pain relief. I used to carry the little pills around as a precaution but never needed them as a treadmill stress test indicated my ticker was fine.

We need a real doc or nurse to answer here, not me! :cool:

I'm not a doctor and I am not giving medical advise or a diagnosis.

It sounds like OP is describing stable angina. The pain predictably comes with exertion and goes away with rest and/or nitroglycerin. There have been studys on excercise and stable angina. A couple easy to read articles summarizing these studies from medscape below.

If a cardiologist said it was ok, then I'd go with it. there are obviously risks to taking a non-intervential approach as is true for taking an invasive intervential approach (stents).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/708588
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/719400

TheIronMaster
04-22-2014, 05:29 AM
It took them while to diagnose mine. I was told it was heart burn to anxiety. I was having symptoms for awhile. The last time it was the worse. My wife took me to a hospital out of town this time. Told them my history and to please dig deeper to find the route of the issue. Hope you and your wife get answers too.