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FoodGood
03-20-2014, 10:26 AM
Hi there : )

I heard people say that light bread is light thanks to 2 ingredients:

1. Water
2. Yeast (or other leavening..)

BUT..it is light right after baking, and when the time goes by, the water evaporates.
They said that this evaporation causes the bread to be less light, because the decreasing of the water in the product causes the increasing of the carbs per slice, and then it becomes more like regular bread (AGAIN..OVER TIME)

What do you say?
Does it sound real? :S

Thanks : )

VinBin
03-20-2014, 12:44 PM
There are many factors that can contribute to "light" bread. Commonly you can simply see the serving size is less than regular bread. A light bread may have a serving size (slice) less than the serving size of regular bread (ex. regular bread serving size 40g, while light bread is 30g). Also, light bread often has less density, more filler and components that add fiber to reduce on the calorie content.

Your statement regarding the bread somehow gaining carbs per slice does not really make sense. Even if water evaporates, the weight will decrease. IF you are so concerned regarding the calories, simply weight the slices and compare to the serving size listed in the nutrition facts. Although as long as you are consistent it doesn't really make a difference in the big picture.

chindonya
04-02-2014, 09:36 AM
Hi there : )

I heard people say that light bread is light thanks to 2 ingredients:

1. Water
2. Yeast (or other leavening..)

BUT..it is light right after baking, and when the time goes by, the water evaporates.
They said that this evaporation causes the bread to be less light, because the decreasing of the water in the product causes the increasing of the carbs per slice, and then it becomes more like regular bread (AGAIN..OVER TIME)

What do you say?
Does it sound real? :S

Thanks : )

Ha ha. That's some "bro logic" right there. Okay, let's assume everything you say is true. The carbs per slice will not increase, but as water evaporates, there will be a higher carbs to water ratio in the bread. There will not be a change in the carb content of the bread. It would make no caloric or nutritional difference because water has net zero nutrition value (from a caloric standpoint anyway). Conversely, if you dunk your slice of bread into a glass of water, it doesn't become "lighter," it'll actually become heavier in terms of weight, but it will have precisely the same nutritional content as a dried out piece of the same bread.

Some things do change in nutritional value over time. Fruit for example- as it ripens, you get complex carbs being converted into simple sugars. That's why green bananas taste like some kind of bananaish potato monstrosity, and why over-ripe brown bananas taste sugar-sweet.

As an aside, I don't trust the terms "light" or "diet." I always read nutritional information. Sometimes "low calorie" stuff is low calorie because it replaces some complex carbs with crap like saturated fat. It's lower calorie, but paradoxically, higher fat (and bad fat too). Other times the difference is so marginal, it makes zero difference. "Fat free refried beans," for example, doesn't mean much when normal refried beans are something like 0.5 or 1 gram of fat per serving in the first place.

shesprints
04-02-2014, 06:53 PM
Light bread is often "light" due to the addition of cellulose (aka wood pulp) and other types of added fiber like inulin or the fiber from the actual grain, in the best-case scenario.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748703834804576300991196803916