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View Full Version : Rank how hard it is to go pro in each of these sports (nba, nfl, mlb, nhl)



SompletelyCober
02-17-2014, 02:53 PM
From hardest to easiest.

The nba has small rosters and you pretty much need to be an athletic freak or amazingly talented (Steve Nash) but I've heard people talk about how hard it is to play pro baseball.

Explain.

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 02:57 PM
NHL and MLB are the most skill-dependent sports (and least fixed by refs) so they're the hardest and the GOAT?

CobyWan
02-17-2014, 03:10 PM
MLB is the hardest. Not only skill level but the difficult process of proving yourself up the ranks of the farm systems.

doingwork30
02-17-2014, 03:11 PM
NHL and MLB are the most skill-dependent sports (and least fixed by refs) so they're the hardest and the GOAT?

yep i'd mostly agree with this and say that of those two, talent pool is much bigger in baseball making it goat

lettuce be cereal you can make the nba by being born a giant with decent athletic ability and while the nfls talent pool is hoooooge it doesn't take the same amount of skill as it does to play baseball. imo

edit: actually following thread premise 1)mlb 2a)nhl 2b)nfl 4)nba

SompletelyCober
02-17-2014, 03:20 PM
So by all your opinions the average miscer has a much better chance of making the NBA than the MLB?

http://gamereax.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/fordcouncilmeeting.gif

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 03:22 PM
So by all your opinions the average miscer has a much better chance of making the NBA than the MLB?

http://gamereax.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/fordcouncilmeeting.gif


http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg


















Yes.

VTheKing
02-17-2014, 03:28 PM
NBA and NFL - you have to be a freak and start building up early to have a chance. NBA is the hardest since there are so few players per roster; the NFL might not seem as tough to "make it" since there are training rosters, but starting on the reg. is a daunting challenge.
NHL - you need to learn how to do a lot of different things from an early age, else you don't have a chance. have to be a great skater, great with the puck, physical, etc. to be considered. don't necessarily have to be genetically gifted, but you have to be very skilled, smart and tenacious
mlb - might be the easiest physically speaking, but throwing a few miles slower or swinging the bat a moment late won't cut it

cashinout
02-17-2014, 03:30 PM
NBA because you have to be tall first

Taveren
02-17-2014, 03:30 PM
NBA - small rosters, very popular to play among youths
NFL - more dependent on genetics (size and speed) than baseball
MLB
NHL

flexheal
02-17-2014, 03:31 PM
Nba.

Nfl

mlb

nhl

neighborr
02-17-2014, 03:41 PM
Mlb
nba
nfl
nhl

BuffMM
02-17-2014, 03:50 PM
NBA. If you don't get drafted in the first round you're probably going to be in the D-league or playing overseas.

Jmadden44
02-17-2014, 03:51 PM
Nba
Nfl
Nhl
Mlb

Strong username to post content ratio

jross2021
02-17-2014, 03:52 PM
mlb and itsnot close

the skill level between college and nfl/nba is so huge that you can be a good college player and make it.


a good college player in mlb still has to prove himself in rookie ball, low a, high a, aa, aaa just to get to the mlb.

Halberstram1
02-17-2014, 04:00 PM
A much smaller percentage of human beings have the potential to play in the NBA than the others based on genetics alone. Combined with the small roster sizes and the NBA is your answer.

Impurityz
02-17-2014, 04:01 PM
Lol the most skilled sports would be the easiest one to go pro in...


lol misc... just lol

you can learn all the fundamentals.... in the nfl you need more then skill...you need genetics

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 05:11 PM
Lol the most skilled sports would be the easiest one to go pro in...


lol misc... just lol

you can learn all the fundamentals.... in the nfl you need more then skill...you need genetics


Potato post of the century. Philly gonna philly.

jross2021
02-17-2014, 05:20 PM
Lol the most skilled sports would be the easiest one to go pro in...


lol misc... just lol

you can learn all the fundamentals.... in the nfl you need more then skill...you need genetics

because you dont need that for every sport.. okay

typical eagles fan

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 05:22 PM
because you dont need that for every sport.. okay

typical eagles fan

R9Zy7gbgntA

Austanian
02-17-2014, 05:35 PM
Depends how you define pro...

Dude in my office was on the Raiders practice squad for a while and I know several people that made it to D league baseball.

NBA... Small rosters. Being one of 10 or so is not easy. Throw in the difficulty of not being tall and it is by far the hardest. Additionally the huge population of players makes it ridiculous.

MLB - Large rosters make it easier. Extensive development league makes in hard to be a fluke.

NFL depends on nationality- If you are Tongan it is by far the easiest. For everyone else it is pretty difficult.

NHL - Low population of players insures increased likelyhood of professional athletes.

TehScoTTmA
02-17-2014, 05:36 PM
MLB by a long shot. Anyone that thinks differently has never played at a competitive level.

Impurityz
02-17-2014, 05:38 PM
because you dont need that for every sport.. okay

typical eagles fan

LOLOL you think you need genetics in MLB or NHL?

pls go

Brb 100% of the newborn babies are capable of playing mlb/nhl because those are straight fundamentals and skills.
Brb 5% of the newborn babies have a chance to play in the nfl due to their genetics

4567081110
02-17-2014, 05:40 PM
NBA(need to have good genetics, height, and develop your skills from an early age. Small rosters, and overall hard to prove yourself.)

MLB(Most skill dependent sport, requires decent to good genetics, but more coordination than anything.)

NFL(Highly dependent on being born with elite genetics, need to really understand the game to go pro.)

NHL(Not as popular of a sport, if you really dedicate yourself and have alright genetics you have a decent shot.)

freshnevafrozen
02-17-2014, 05:51 PM
NBA and NFL are the hardest since a lot of it is genetics. Hockey and baseball can be done with poverty genetics

Dave P
02-17-2014, 05:53 PM
I would say NFL < MLB < NHL < NBA



NBA strikes me as the hardest since it has the least amount of room per team and the most strict genetic requirements.

NHL after that because it suffers from the same "least amount of room per team" problem, also requires alot of equipment etc so can't be from poverty to really play Hockey.

MLB after that because there is alot more room for players, and on top of that there is a farm system that helps transition and develop people, also alot less genetically dependent than Hockey/Basketball.

NFL is probably the easiest with 52-man rosters and positions for every shape/size/genetic makeup....having almost 1700 starting "spots" makes it naturally seem to be "easier" since there is more "room".




Has nothing to do with athleticism or difficulty, mostly has to do with roster sizes, access to equipment, and complete dependence on genetics.

liftnation1
02-17-2014, 05:55 PM
NBA and it's not nearly close enough.

Forget being tall and athletic, I've seen so many AMAZING players never play at the college level after high school let alone the NBA... its insanely tough.

Herr13
02-17-2014, 06:30 PM
NBA + NFL. If you don't have crazy genetics you're not gonna make it.

MLB and NHL I don't give enough fuks to think about. But MLB would probably be easiest.

liftnation1
02-17-2014, 06:33 PM
NHL is hard too, but a lot less population for that sport. Baseball is the easiest.

BullBoy8
02-17-2014, 06:41 PM
Cant really say what is hardest to go pro in. But football is the easiest to be good at.

Hoop_Dreams
02-17-2014, 06:44 PM
1. NBA


the rest

Mrs Grudge
02-17-2014, 06:52 PM
lol at people saying baseball.


it's basketball by far. You have to be the amongst the best athletes in the world to be in the NBA. You have to be super athletic and at least 6'3 in most cases, anything less than 6'3 you're small, and if you're 6 ft or lower you're at a serious disadvantage. On top of having to be 7 foot tall, you also have to be freakishly athletic, and of course basketball requires a lot of skill especially if you're a perimeter player. On top of that a basketball team doesn't have a lot of roster spots either.

Also more competition in basketball. Think about it, maybe the NBA might not be the most watched, but a LOT of people still play basketball, more than they watch it that is for sure. Basketball in the NCAA is a huge deal, and it is very easy to get lost in the shuffle because of how many freaks there are on every team.

Then you have to factor in foreign players who are also indirectly competing against you (or directly if you're not from America of course). Much less of a problem in the MLB, and practically non existent in the NFL. Basketball and Hockey are obviously more global sports.

aal04
02-17-2014, 07:11 PM
50% of people above 7foot make the nba.

Just saiyin

jross2021
02-17-2014, 07:13 PM
lol at people saying baseball.


it's basketball by far. You have to be the amongst the best athletes in the world to be in the NBA. You have to be super athletic and at least 6'3 in most cases, anything less than 6'3 you're small, and if you're 6 ft or lower you're at a serious disadvantage. On top of having to be 7 foot tall, you also have to be freakishly athletic, and of course basketball requires a lot of skill especially if you're a perimeter player. On top of that a basketball team doesn't have a lot of roster spots either.

Also more competition in basketball. Think about it, maybe the NBA might not be the most watched, but a LOT of people still play basketball, more than they watch it that is for sure. Basketball in the NCAA is a huge deal, and it is very easy to get lost in the shuffle because of how many freaks there are on every team.

Then you have to factor in foreign players who are also indirectly competing against you (or directly if you're not from America of course). Much less of a problem in the MLB, and practically non existent in the NFL. Basketball and Hockey are obviously more global sports.

lmfao. anyone can hit a jumper. only a small % can hit a 90 mph fastball, let alone do it while also worrying about all the other pitches a pitcher can throw. on the opposite spectrum, even less people can throw a 90 mph fastball

jross2021
02-17-2014, 07:15 PM
lol at people saying baseball.


it's basketball by far. You have to be the amongst the best athletes in the world to be in the NBA. You have to be super athletic and at least 6'3 in most cases, anything less than 6'3 you're small, and if you're 6 ft or lower you're at a serious disadvantage. On top of having to be 7 foot tall, you also have to be freakishly athletic, and of course basketball requires a lot of skill especially if you're a perimeter player. On top of that a basketball team doesn't have a lot of roster spots either.

Also more competition in basketball. Think about it, maybe the NBA might not be the most watched, but a LOT of people still play basketball, more than they watch it that is for sure. Basketball in the NCAA is a huge deal, and it is very easy to get lost in the shuffle because of how many freaks there are on every team.

Then you have to factor in foreign players who are also indirectly competing against you (or directly if you're not from America of course). Much less of a problem in the MLB, and practically non existent in the NFL. Basketball and Hockey are obviously more global sports.


no foreign players in mlb? lmfao. japan, dr, pr, mexico, etc.. are all heavily recruited into US colleges and fill up a strong amount of mlb teams.

Hoop_Dreams
02-17-2014, 07:16 PM
lmfao. anyone can hit a jumper. only a small % can hit a 90 mph fastball, let alone do it while also worrying about all the other pitches a pitcher can throw. on the opposite spectrum, even less people can throw a 90 mph fastball
lol @ thinking you'd be able to get a shot off vs. an NBA player

DaarioNaharis
02-17-2014, 07:16 PM
lmfao. anyone can hit a jumper. only a small % can hit a 90 mph fastball, let alone do it while also worrying about all the other pitches a pitcher can throw. on the opposite spectrum, even less people can throw a 90 mph fastball

This guy knows what he's talking about ^^^^


Not because he played, but because he was the waterboy for every sports team at our high school.

airdog93
02-17-2014, 07:18 PM
NBA - small rosters, very popular to play among youths
NFL - more dependent on genetics (size and speed) than baseball
MLB
NHL

lmfao the NFL is dependent on genetics, but the nba isnt? (average height=6'7)

SompletelyCober
02-17-2014, 07:28 PM
lmfao. anyone can hit a jumper. only a small % can hit a 90 mph fastball, let alone do it while also worrying about all the other pitches a pitcher can throw. on the opposite spectrum, even less people can throw a 90 mph fastball

lol at getting a shot off with an elite defender shadowing you

It's always cute when manlets try to talk about basketball. You essentially have to be one of the top 5 athletes in the league (Nate Robinson) to make the league as a manlet.

Mrs Grudge
02-17-2014, 07:31 PM
lmfao. anyone can hit a jumper. only a small % can hit a 90 mph fastball, let alone do it while also worrying about all the other pitches a pitcher can throw. on the opposite spectrum, even less people can throw a 90 mph fastball

Something tells me there is a much higher % of people who can hit a ball going 90 MPH than people who are over 6'6 tall, do you realize how silly your argument is?

Not to mention your point about jumpers is insanely ignorant. For one, even if you were an amazing jump shooter, that would still not be enough to make it in the NBA since you'd actually have to be athletic or tall enough to guard your position, and even if you did make the NBA, you would be a bench player.

And that's assuming you're a God like jump shooter. Not "anyone" can become an NBA level jump shooter, requires thousands upon thousands of hours of practice to be an elite shooter. And keep in mind, this is me talking about you making jump shots when you're wide open, not when you're being guarded by freakishly fast and tall people.

Mrs Grudge
02-17-2014, 07:33 PM
no foreign players in mlb? lmfao. japan, dr, pr, mexico, etc.. are all heavily recruited into US colleges and fill up a strong amount of mlb teams.
You have reading problems bro? I didn't say there were no foreign players in the MLB, I said there was less global competition in the MLB than there is in the NBA.

And ROFL at you saying "etc" as if you could name so many more countries that produce a lot of pro baseball players.

sakau2007
02-17-2014, 07:36 PM
mlb and itsnot close

the skill level between college and nfl/nba is so huge that you can be a good college player and make it.


a good college player in mlb still has to prove himself in rookie ball, low a, high a, aa, aaa just to get to the mlb.

yeah, um, there are 750+ MLB players and about half as many NBA players. So how exactly is it easier to get to MLB?

airdog93
02-17-2014, 07:37 PM
lol at getting a shot off with an elite defender shadowing you

It's always cute when manlets try to talk about basketball. You essentially have to be one of the top 5 athletes in the league (Nate Robinson) to make the league as a manlet.

baseball=skill based

football, basketball=genetic based

Swept
02-17-2014, 08:16 PM
NBA because you basically got to be 6'4, less than 1% of the population is 6'4.

Even though there are guys like Hibbert and other 7 footers who had no talent what so ever that made into the league.

mexanacho
02-17-2014, 08:24 PM
Lol the most skilled sports would be the easiest one to go pro in...


lol misc... just lol

you can learn all the fundamentals.... in the nfl you need more then skill...you need genetics

Brb learning how to throw 90 mph.

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 09:25 PM
NBA because you basically got to be 6'4, less than 1% of the population is 6'4.

Even though there are guys like Hibbert and other 7 footers who had no talent what so ever that made into the league.


http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg

ToolTime2120
02-17-2014, 09:31 PM
Strong no racist but.......

if your white and under 6'6, don't even think about NBA (just the way it is)

in my opinion after that, ranking easiest to hardest would be NFL, NHL, MLB

Shortstop36
02-17-2014, 09:35 PM
it depends.

If you're average size it would be extremely hard to go pro in the nfl and nba. however if you're a huge human being going pro in those sports would be easier.



However baseball is the hardest sport skill wise.

ShweezyBTFO
02-17-2014, 09:39 PM
Strong no racist but.......

if your white and under 6'6, don't even think about NBA (just the way it is)



http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg

sakau2007
02-18-2014, 06:00 AM
you can keep posting pictures of jimmer fredette, but think of all the baseball players people could post pictures of that are not very athletic. jimmer fredette would run circles around quite a few MLB players in terms of athleticism.

KryptonKnight
02-18-2014, 09:56 AM
lol at getting a shot off with an elite defender shadowing you

It's always cute when manlets try to talk about basketball. You essentially have to be one of the top 5 athletes in the league (Nate Robinson) to make the league as a manlet.

^This. Nate Robinson is manverage, but also has black genetics. Just saying. White manlets of peace need not apply.



it depends.

If you're average size it would be extremely hard to go pro in the nfl and nba. however if you're a huge human being going pro in those sports would be easier.



However baseball is the hardest sport skill wise.

Disagree. Debateable, but basketball, hockey, and most positions in the NFL require more skill than any baseball positions, barring pitcher and maybe catcher.

Of the four sports in the OP, baseball is probably the least demanding physically, and has the lowest genetic requirements.

NBA is the hardest. You can't train height like you can a skill, and on top of being genetically gifted (tall), you still have to athletic and skilled enough to play the game. Takes a tremendous amount of skill at the highest levels, and the team sizes are so small. Huge sport internationally means foreign competition for spots. Only beats NFL because of smaller roster sizes.

Pro football also requires elite genetics. It's not enough to be strong, or fast, or tall, you need combinations of traits. For example, many of the manlets are unusually strong and lightning fast. Skill position players are probably some of the best athletes of any sport. Even the kickers have elite leg strength (most people could never kick a ball 70 yards down the field). Probably owns the most physical freaks compare to any other sport. Almost no international competition, but they physical nature of the game means injuries are likely to derail your career before you can even make it to the pros. So many high school greats fail in college, and so many college stars fail in the NFL.

Hockey equipment being expensive doesn't make it harder to make it to the NHL, it should make it easier, as having a smaller talent pool (since a lot of people can't afford the equipment and even fewer have access to the equipment and the ice) means less competition. Most people in the south for example don't play hockey simply because they don't have access to a rink or ice. Hockey takes way more skill and athleticism than baseball, but doesn't require the elite genetics of basketball or football. You do need to be tough as nails, but that's not really genetic.

Baseball is last. Lowest genetic requirements, even lower than hockey, and dirt cheap to play too. You may have international competition for roster spots, but you also have minor leagues to develop talent. Most baseball players can't throw 90mph, so take that out of the general discussion. It takes skill to hit a fastball or throw an out, but probably not more than it takes to skate backwards or forwards while handling a puck.

FMCMuscle
02-18-2014, 11:05 AM
Nba
nfl
mlb
nhl

bigcc
02-18-2014, 11:17 AM
Cant really say what is hardest to go pro in. But football is the easiest to be good at.

be good at in general or be good at in the pro level?

bigcc
02-18-2014, 11:18 AM
50% of people above 7foot make the nba.

Just saiyin


that's absolutely not true

jross2021
02-18-2014, 11:45 AM
yeah, um, there are 750+ MLB players and about half as many NBA players. So how exactly is it easier to get to MLB?

everyone 5 year old int he world plays baseball and wants to go pro. #'s don't equate to how easy it is.

Blax0r
02-18-2014, 12:53 PM
Seems we're mostly debating on the correct two leagues (MLB, NBA).

My knee-jerk reaction was NBA, but I interpreted the question as #pro players/#players pursuing the pros. In this case, I would assume 99.9% of men under 6'3" would take himself out of talent pool, making NBA odds a little better.

For MLB, genetics do not come into the equation (as much), so the talent pool is probably gigantic. This makes the #pros/#going for pros a lot smaller, so I voted for MLB.

Maybe OP can make his question a little more specific?

GinoFelino
02-18-2014, 02:02 PM
NBA least chance

NHL best chance

jross2021
02-18-2014, 02:28 PM
you can keep posting pictures of jimmer fredette, but think of all the baseball players people could post pictures of that are not very athletic. jimmer fredette would run circles around quite a few MLB players in terms of athleticism.

what does that have to do with anything?


and strong ****ign responses to my one post.. thread says make it to the NBA, not excel in the nba.

WoofieNugget
02-18-2014, 02:30 PM
If we are talking North American professional then I'd say NBA. However, making a professional team in another country in basketball or hockey is a lot easier. Same with baseball - you can play in Japan or another country. There really aren't professional football teams anywhere else except North America.

You also have to consider the process. If you consider hockey, your parents have to basically live and breathe hockey with you from the age of 5 onwards and be very committed, and there is a HUGE lower structure and high level of skill needed before you even get considered to be drafted. Basketball doesn't really have a farm league, players are genetic freaks and develop skills in school and during the summer in camps. Football is similar in that there is high school - college - NFL process. You can even walk onto tryouts for some college teams in football and if you are incredibly gifted, transfer to a D1 team and likely get drafted. No way that would ever happen in hockey because there is way too much skill involved that is developed really early. Even basketball players can be 7' tall and useless and get developed while they are in college programs - again, not going to happen with hockey or baseball.

Hoop_Dreams
02-18-2014, 03:09 PM
http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg


[img]http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg[/ig]


[img]http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg[/mg]

lol. You must be assuming his lack of defense = not athletic. Or is it his skin color that gave you that impression? Probably both.

Jimmer had elite agility #'s at the combine. Also a 33 inch vertical is nothing to brag about in the NBA, but that shyts on the average person.

Hoop_Dreams
02-18-2014, 03:13 PM
NBA is the hardest. You can't train height like you can a skill, and on top of being genetically gifted (tall), you still have to athletic and skilled enough to play the game. Takes a tremendous amount of skill at the highest levels, and the team sizes are so small. Huge sport internationally means foreign competition for spots. Only beats NFL because of smaller roster sizes.
/thread

"Bu-bu-bu any 7 footer can make it to the NBA just because he's tall"

K, lemme go train to be 7 feet

Amaso
02-18-2014, 03:28 PM
1. Nba
2. Nhl
3. Nfl
4. Mlb

RAdaRuggedMan
02-18-2014, 04:27 PM
Lol @ anyone that doesn't say NBA.

BRB most popular sport in US, 2nd most popular in the world. Probably the sport most dependent on genetics (if your goal is the NBA), and it's also one of the most skill based sports too.

SmarterChild
02-18-2014, 05:11 PM
Nhl and MLB has players from all around the world and you don't have to go to college first

Just because ur drafted doesn't mean ur going to the pros

Babyframes
02-18-2014, 05:16 PM
NBA by a mile. You can train yourself to hit a 90 mph fast ball. You can't train yourself to be 6'5.

KryptonKnight
02-18-2014, 09:34 PM
BRB most popular sport in US

Fukin' lol'd.

Dave P
02-18-2014, 09:36 PM
Lol @ anyone that doesn't say NBA.

BRB most popular sport in US


You fcking wot m8?

BenadrylBandit
02-18-2014, 09:38 PM
Lol @ anyone that doesn't say NBA.

BRB most popular sport in US, 2nd most popular in the world. Probably the sport most dependent on genetics (if your goal is the NBA), and it's also one of the most skill based sports too.

Wait, wait, wait, wait.

You do realize the NBA ranked behind the NFL, MLB, and Nascar in the US?

21Classic
02-18-2014, 09:42 PM
mlb and itsnot close

the skill level between college and nfl/nba is so huge that you can be a good college player and make it.


a good college player in mlb still has to prove himself in rookie ball, low a, high a, aa, aaa just to get to the mlb.



Meaning baseball players have a shiit ton of opportunities to prove themselves



Whereas if you dont make the NFL after college, you will never make it.



1. NBA
2. NFL - Them kickers/punters
3. MLB
4. NHL - only reason NHL is last is because theres good opps outside the US to play good pro level hockey. Them icey countries love hockey

flexheal
02-18-2014, 09:44 PM
Wait, wait, wait, wait.

You do realize the NBA ranked behind the NFL, MLB, and Nascar in the US?

Do you know it's ahead of NHL?

HotCheetos
02-18-2014, 10:09 PM
NHL easily. Need better hand eye than any of the other sports. If you aren't skating by age 4 you basically have no chance. Must have elite work ethic to be any good (being real, work ethic is not something you can learn at a level like the NHL). Everyone saying for the NBA you must be tall just LOL, almost everyone in every sport is over 6' in professional sports, and if they aren't then they generally have blazing speed or much higher skill level than the taller players. That is not something NBA specific.

Dribbling a basketball, throwing a ball, running, etc are all basic movements in the other three sports...now brb throw on skates and hit tiny piece of rubber with long thin stick while others use sticks to knock it away and others try and knock your face off.

GinoFelino
02-18-2014, 10:12 PM
NHL easily. Need better hand eye than any of the other sports. If you aren't skating by age 4 you basically have no chance. Must have elite work ethic to be any good (being real, work ethic is not something you can learn at a level like the NHL). Everyone saying for the NBA you must be tall just LOL, almost everyone in every sport is over 6' in professional sports, and if they aren't then they generally have blazing speed or much higher skill level than the taller players. That is not something NBA specific.

Dribbling a basketball, throwing a ball, running, etc are all basic movements in the other three sports...now brb throw on skates and hit tiny piece of rubber with long thin stick while others use sticks to knock it away and others try and knock your face off.

Dis nikka serious

HotCheetos
02-18-2014, 10:14 PM
Dis nikka seriouscome at me brah

KryptonKnight
02-18-2014, 10:27 PM
Dis nikka serious

Smh. Oh well. Some people won't get it.

GinoFelino
02-18-2014, 10:36 PM
come at me brah

Serious post here. Keep in mind I'm talking all relative to professional athletes and not implying it's easy to become pro in any sport.

Skating can be learned (not that hard). Stick handling can be learned. Defense can be learned. Being 6'6" with a 40 inch vertical cannot be learned. Hockey is more skills based and any sport that is skills based can be learned relatively easier than a sport that is freak genetics based. And what are you talking about throwing on skates? It's really not that hard skating and controlling a puck with a stick any moreso than throwing a spiral, for example.

HotCheetos
02-18-2014, 10:54 PM
Serious post here. Keep in mind I'm talking all relative to professional athletes and not implying it's easy to be come pro in any sport.

Skating can be learned (not that hard). Stick handling can be learned. Defense can be learned. Being 6'6" with a 40 inch vertical cannot be learned. Hockey is more skills based and any sport that is skills based can be learned relatively easier than a sport that is freak genetics based. And what are you talking about throwing on skates? It's really not that hard skating and controlling a puck with a stick any moreso than throwing a spiral, for example.
Lol, okay big difference between skating and skating at a professional level. Starting and stoping on a dime, changing directions instantly while stick handling through players. These are not things you just learn, if you don't start doing it when you are extremely young then you have no chance. If these were "just skills" like dribbling or throwing then you'd hear about NHL players who picked up hockey in HS, but that doesn't happen like it does in the other three. Stick handling is yes a skill, but you will always suck at it without elite hand eye coordination.

BenadrylBandit
02-18-2014, 10:58 PM
Do you know it's ahead of NHL?

Did I list the NHL above it?


NHL has brought in more revenue over recent years, it's just a matter of time till the NBA falls to irrelevance, the only reason it's still going strong is because of ESPN.

DolobMe
02-18-2014, 11:49 PM
Lol, okay big difference between skating and skating at a professional level. Starting and stoping on a dime, changing directions instantly while stick handling through players. These are not things you just learn, if you don't start doing it when you are extremely young then you have no chance. If these were "just skills" like dribbling or throwing then you'd hear about NHL players who picked up hockey in HS, but that doesn't happen like it does in the other three. Stick handling is yes a skill, but you will always suck at it without elite hand eye coordination.

See here's the thing, you say you have to start at an extremely young age for hockey - that's fair. Now for NFL/NBA it doesn't matter when you start, if your genetic coding doesn't give you a height of 6'+ with blazing speed and a high vertical your chances are next to zero.

Being professional in the NHL is based primarily on controllable variables like puck handling development, skating development, etc.

Being professional in the NBA and NFL is based primarily on uncontrollable variables like height, wing span, speed (yes it can be trained but your genetic baseline is more important), etc

Babyframes
02-18-2014, 11:55 PM
Lol, okay big difference between skating and skating at a professional level. Starting and stoping on a dime, changing directions instantly while stick handling through players. These are not things you just learn, if you don't start doing it when you are extremely young then you have no chance. If these were "just skills" like dribbling or throwing then you'd hear about NHL players who picked up hockey in HS, but that doesn't happen like it does in the other three. Stick handling is yes a skill, but you will always suck at it without elite hand eye coordination.

Again, these things can be learned. You can't learn genetics.

Case and point. Average NBA player is nearly 6'7. AVERAGE.

flexheal
02-19-2014, 12:11 AM
Did I list the NHL above it?


NHL has brought in more revenue over recent years, it's just a matter of time till the NBA falls to irrelevance, the only reason it's still going strong is because of ESPN.

More opinions and less facts from you.

Here's a fact.

Basketball's tv ratings have been up since the early 2000's. Last years finals were the most watched in years. NBA finals had more viewers tuning in than the NHL finals

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jesselawrence/2013/06/20/stanley-cuptickets-higher-than-nba-finals-tickets/

dweeegs
02-19-2014, 01:46 AM
NBA because of height dependence...

MLB next because of how freaking huge the farm system is. HUGE disparity between college level and MLB level, one of the few (maybe only) sports where you can't transition straight from college and have the ability to play, even if horribly, at the top level. I am unaware of how the NHL works though.

Then NFL and the rest following.

Zylantypic
02-19-2014, 02:08 AM
The MLB, then the NHL, then the NBA, then the NFL.

Cringing at all these phaggots ITT who know nothing about baseball saying it isn't the hardest. Thread should be reserved for people who know what they **** they're talking about. You require no genetics for baseball, it's all skill (and it's the hardest sport skill wise to pick up and become great at).

homerun13
02-19-2014, 02:50 AM
Hardest: NBA

Simply because there are not many spots. How many are on a roster? 12? 30 teams? 12x30=360

Look at the draft, 1st rounders make on the team, then some 2nd rounder too. That's it. Compare that to the NFL draft.

Easiest: NFL

40 on a roster? 32 teams? 40x32=1280

Baseball is the easiest to play professional but probably in the middle with the NHL to actually make it to the majors.

HotCheetos
02-19-2014, 08:28 AM
See here's the thing, you say you have to start at an extremely young age for hockey - that's fair. Now for NFL/NBA it doesn't matter when you start, if your genetic coding doesn't give you a height of 6'+ with blazing speed and a high vertical your chances are next to zero.

Being professional in the NHL is based primarily on controllable variables like puck handling development, skating development, etc.

Being professional in the NBA and NFL is based primarily on uncontrollable variables like height, wing span, speed (yes it can be trained but your genetic baseline is more important), etc
How can something be hard if you can start it later in life and still have a shot at making it pro?


Again, these things can be learned. You can't learn genetics.

Case and point. Average NBA player is nearly 6'7. AVERAGE.
I guess we have a different definition of what "hard" is then. How can something be "hard" to make it in if it requires minimal experience and effort? I get what you are saying, but to me that doesn't make it hard. Yes the NBA is tall, but it isn't like they have a required height to get in. I know it has been a long time since Muggsy Bogues and Spud Webb, but you still have players like Earl Boykins who have made it into the NBA. I guess we will probably just have to agree to disagree since we are just taking this from different approaches.


The MLB, then the NHL, then the NBA, then the NFL.

Cringing at all these phaggots ITT who know nothing about baseball saying it isn't the hardest. Thread should be reserved for people who know what they **** they're talking about. You require no genetics for baseball, it's all skill (and it's the hardest sport skill wise to pick up and become great at).

LOL brb no athleticism required to play DH, 1B, or Pitcher. All can be fat and slow and still be considered good players even if they are winded after running for 10 seconds. They also have the largest minor league system so you have more chances to prove yourself and has the largest amount of players drafted...brb drafted in the 47th round....wat?

dweeegs
02-19-2014, 10:38 AM
LOL brb no athleticism required to play DH, 1B, or Pitcher.

You need a freak arm to make it to the bigs as a pitcher

No one gets drafted for DH

1B usually needs some sort of good power, more so if you're overweight that's what you need to rely on


All can be fat and slow and still be considered good players even if they are winded after running for 10 seconds. They also have the largest minor league system so you have more chances to prove yourself and has the largest amount of players drafted...brb drafted in the 47th round....wat?

Which is exactly why it's harder... you have more teams to go through to get there. AAA, AA, A-Advanced, A, A shortened season, Rookie, and International.

The Orioles have 8 sub-teams. When you're drafted, you have to beat out 300-350 or so other guys that were drafted just for the same team to get there, not including the independent leagues. MLB is the only sport where you almost can't play in the majors right after college. Since the amateur draft started almost 50 years ago, there's been 11 players total to go straight to the bigs out of all those drafted. Huge disparity between college level and MLB level

HotCheetos
02-19-2014, 11:31 AM
You need a freak arm to make it to the bigs as a pitcher

No one gets drafted for DH

1B usually needs some sort of good power, more so if you're overweight that's what you need to rely on



Which is exactly why it's harder... you have more teams to go through to get there. AAA, AA, A-Advanced, A, A shortened season, Rookie, and International.

The Orioles have 8 sub-teams. When you're drafted, you have to beat out 300-350 or so other guys that were drafted just for the same team to get there, not including the independent leagues. MLB is the only sport where you almost can't play in the majors right after college. Since the amateur draft started almost 50 years ago, there's been 11 players total to go straight to the bigs out of all those drafted. Huge disparity between college level and MLB level

You have to have freak strength, conditioning, and skills to make it in other sports, a pitcher ONLY needs a freak arm.

Nobody gets drafted at DH, but again when you have 50 rounds in a draft they're going to take you at whatever position you pretend to play until you are outclassed at defense and you default to DH.

A first baseman needs good power...one of the easiest things to work on...especially in MLB (brb need to go ride a bike)

wat? Its harder to make it into the MLB when you are playing for a minor league affiliate than it is to make an NFL team when you aren't playing at all? Much easier to make it into any league when you can catch a coaches eye as opposed to not having a farm system like the NFL and if you aren't drafted you are working at McDonalds, you basically have no chance right from the start if you don't make the team. Logic not even once.

Much easier to make it into any league when you can catch a coaches eye as opposed to not having a farm system like the NFL and if you aren't drafted you are working at McDonalds, you basically have no chance right from the start if you don't make the team.

jross2021
02-19-2014, 11:58 AM
Wait, wait, wait, wait.

You do realize the NBA ranked behind the NFL, MLB, and Nascar in the US?

as in "favorite sport" yes.. as in popularity, no.. There is a difference. People don't know how to read between the lines lmfao.

TheInfluenced
02-19-2014, 01:16 PM
Athletic/Genetic: Basketball
Skill: Baseball

dweeegs
02-19-2014, 02:00 PM
You have to have freak strength, conditioning, and skills to make it in other sports, a pitcher ONLY needs a freak arm.

Nobody gets drafted at DH, but again when you have 50 rounds in a draft they're going to take you at whatever position you pretend to play until you are outclassed at defense and you default to DH.

[quote]A first baseman needs good power...one of the easiest things to work on...especially in MLB (brb need to go ride a bike)

This is different than anyone else on a bike in another sport because...


wat? Its harder to make it into the MLB when you are playing for a minor league affiliate than it is to make an NFL team when you aren't playing at all? Much easier to make it into any league when you can catch a coaches eye as opposed to not having a farm system like the NFL and if you aren't drafted you are working at McDonalds, you basically have no chance right from the start if you don't make the team. Logic not even once.

Much easier to make it into any league when you can catch a coaches eye as opposed to not having a farm system like the NFL and if you aren't drafted you are working at McDonalds, you basically have no chance right from the start if you don't make the team.

Minor Leaguers are working at McDonalds anywways, you make under 2 grand/month at the max level in minor leagues.


• First contract season: $850/month maximum.
• Alien Salary Rates: Different for aliens on visas – mandated by INS
• Triple-A – First year: $2,150/month, after first year no less than $2,150/month
• Class AA – First year: $1,500/month, after first year no less than $1,500/month
• Class A (full season) – First year: $1,050/month, after first year no less than $1,050/month
• Class A (short-season) – First year: $850/month, after first year no less than $850/month
• Dominican & Venezuelan Summer Leagues–no lower than $300/month

If you ARE drafted you need another job for almost every player anyways. For multiple years

ComingHard
02-19-2014, 02:34 PM
IF you have the right genetics, NBA is the easiest sport to go pro in.
When you're over 7 feet tall you have a 50% chance of being in the NBA (that is a serious statistic from an article I read once)

MLB is the hardest to go pro in because you are completing with millions of mexican manlets and skinny fat white trash, and genetics doesn't mean ****.

RAdaRuggedMan
02-19-2014, 02:54 PM
Fukin' lol'd.


You fcking wot m8?


Wait, wait, wait, wait.

You do realize the NBA ranked behind the NFL, MLB, and Nascar in the US?
Thought it was quite clear that I was implying that BASKETBALL is the most popularly played sport in the US and 2nd in the world.

Mrs Grudge
02-19-2014, 03:02 PM
NHL easily. Need better hand eye than any of the other sports. If you aren't skating by age 4 you basically have no chance. Must have elite work ethic to be any good (being real, work ethic is not something you can learn at a level like the NHL). Everyone saying for the NBA you must be tall just LOL, almost everyone in every sport is over 6' in professional sports, and if they aren't then they generally have blazing speed or much higher skill level than the taller players. That is not something NBA specific.

Dribbling a basketball, throwing a ball, running, etc are all basic movements in the other three sports...now brb throw on skates and hit tiny piece of rubber with long thin stick while others use sticks to knock it away and others try and knock your face off.
Yes it is. Being "tall" in other sports means you're short in basketball. If you're 6'3 which is really tall for most sports, you're the smallest guy on the court on the NBA, and to be 6'3 in the NBA you have to play the position that requires the most skill in the sport (point guard).

There's a reason why these star Tight Ends like Jimmy Graham in the NFL can't play in the NBA despite being really athletic, it's because someone who is "only" 6'6 needs guard skills.

BenadrylBandit
02-19-2014, 03:05 PM
Thought it was quite clear that I was implying that BASKETBALL is the most popularly played sport in the US and 2nd in the world.

Would like numbers to back this claim. Might argue baseball is played more in the US. Basketball is obviously more popular in low income areas because of the low cost to play, but organized sport wise, there's little league every where. Little league is so popular that there's a televised world series for it...

travellingbrah
02-19-2014, 03:56 PM
NBA is the most difficult. Fewer roster spots and the largest talent pool to draw from.

Next is Baseball. Very skill oriented sport with a pretty large talent pool, though smaller than the NBA's.

NFL. Massive talent pool, most played sport by far in America for talented athletes so it's incredibly competitive. However it is very dependent on athleticism so most positions have a shorter learning curve than other sports (qb is a different story). Which is why you will occasionally see guys who have no experience in the sport signing NFL contracts because they have the athleticism to make up for it.

NHL comes in last. Tiny talent pool, mostly upper middle class kids that can afford to get into it competitively. Skill dependent with a high learning curve but it's got such a tiny talent pool to draw from that it doesn't make a difference. Nowhere near as competitive as the others sports, all of which get a much larger portion of talented athletes. Basically, you have way, way fewer people to be better than with hockey.

KryptonKnight
02-19-2014, 03:56 PM
Thought it was quite clear that I was implying that BASKETBALL is the most popularly played sport in the US and 2nd in the world.

You obviously thought wrong.

In any case, it doesn't matter if it's the 2nd most played sport in the world if the vast majority of those players don't have the genetics to make it in the PROs.

RAdaRuggedMan
02-19-2014, 03:57 PM
Would like numbers to back this claim. Might argue baseball is played more in the US. Basketball is obviously more popular in low income areas because of the low cost to play, but organized sport wise, there's little league every where. Little league is so popular that there's a televised world series for it...
There's AAU basketball everywhere.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_in_the_United_States#Popular_team_sports
Basketball is also played more in a non organized level (i.e. pickup). Soccer and probably football are also played more than baseball in that respect.

Also, baseball can hardly be considered a real sport. It's in the same realm as Sumo imo, both national past times of their respective countries, both only require 5 seconds of effort.

xler
02-19-2014, 04:04 PM
its not hard to have the required genetic tools to make it to the pros... either you do or you dont. so i wont put down height etc as a reason why the NBA is difficult.

id say mlb would be the hardest... although its not the most athletic sport, the pool of competition is ****ing huge. you gotta beat out a **** ton of other players to make a 25 man roster.

KryptonKnight
02-19-2014, 04:07 PM
NBA is the most difficult. Fewer roster spots and the largest talent pool to draw from.

Next is Baseball. Very skill oriented sport with a pretty large talent pool, though smaller than the NBA's.

NFL. Massive talent pool, most played sport by far in America for talented athletes so it's incredibly competitive. However it is very dependent on athleticism so most positions have a shorter learning curve than other sports (qb is a different story)


Disagreed. The actual talent pool of genetically qualified players in bball isn't that large. We've already established the majority of manmores aren't gonna make it. Just because a bunch of manlets play pickups games doesn't mean the talent pool is larger.

Football is more dependent on athleticism, which means it should be harder to go pro than in a sport where genetics don't matter as much (i.e. baseball). Just like you can't train height, you can't train arm length, and you only train so much to increase speed. If you were born fat, slow, weak, short, you could still play pro baseball; you aren't playing pro football.

Baseball has a farm system that the NFL doesn't. If you don't get drafted out of college and find success in the next 2-3 years, chances are you aren't making it. You can also play baseball for a lot longer than you can play football. Potentially longer career = more chances to go pro. You could make it on a major league team @ 28, but you aren't going to the combine that old.

KryptonKnight
02-19-2014, 04:13 PM
its not hard to have the required genetic tools to make it to the pros... either you do or you dont. so i wont put down height etc as a reason why the NBA is difficult.


It might not be "hard" to have the required genetic tools to play pro football or basketball, but without them the chances of you going pro are next to nil.

At least in baseball and hockey you could develop enough skill to make up for genetic deficiencies. You don't need to be a physical freak to make it.

I blame OP for not defining what "how hard is it to go pro" means. Seems like the more physical the sport, the more injuries and genetics come into play when it comes to going pro. Thus NBA/NFL, NHL, MLB. If NFL rosters were the same size as the NBA's, then the NFL would be hardest.

RAdaRuggedMan
02-19-2014, 04:21 PM
its not hard to have the required genetic tools to make it to the pros... either you do or you dont. so i wont put down height etc as a reason why the NBA is difficult.

id say mlb would be the hardest... although its not the most athletic sport, the pool of competition is ****ing huge. you gotta beat out a **** ton of other players to make a 25 man roster.
Notsureifsrs

If you don't have height, you need great athleticism, handles, jump shot, and IQ.
If you have height, you still need the above, but you also have to train and make sure you aren't prone to injury.

BenadrylBandit
02-19-2014, 08:14 PM
There's AAU basketball everywhere.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_in_the_United_States#Popular_team_sports
Basketball is also played more in a non organized level (i.e. pickup). Soccer and probably football are also played more than baseball in that respect.

Also, baseball can hardly be considered a real sport. It's in the same realm as Sumo imo, both national past times of their respective countries, both only require 5 seconds of effort.

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/9a/cf/46/9acf46eba879705e9ff0f3c7a288cb88.jpg

HotCheetos
02-19-2014, 09:11 PM
This is different than anyone else on a bike in another sport because...



Minor Leaguers are working at McDonalds anywways, you make under 2 grand/month at the max level in minor leagues.



If you ARE drafted you need another job for almost every player anyways. For multiple years
The difference is, for whatever reason, it seems to be MUCH easier to ride a bike without getting caught in MLB.

WTF does pay for being in the minors have to do with anything? My point was you are still being looked at because you are still competitively competing in the sport, whereas NFL you'd be moving on with your life if you didn't make an NFL team.

dixie_normus
02-20-2014, 01:00 PM
I may be biased but i'd say baseball...

brb I was honorable mention for all american in D1 baseball..
brb went to 4 private try outs for pro teams...
brb no call backs at all

ProteinNCarbs
02-20-2014, 01:16 PM
MLB is the hardest. Not only skill level but the difficult process of proving yourself up the ranks of the farm systems.

I would argue that having the farm systems makes it easier to go pro. If you're not ready for the big leagues then you can develop yourself in the minors.

NFL tho there is no minor leagues or D-league so if you're not ready for the big leagues you're cut

skinnyFAT91
02-20-2014, 01:30 PM
NHL, you dont start playing by 8 years old you aint going to make it. By the time you reach you drop enough money to pay for college. Expensive sport to boot.

travellingbrah
02-20-2014, 03:54 PM
Disagreed. The actual talent pool of genetically qualified players in bball isn't that large. We've already established the majority of manmores aren't gonna make it. Just because a bunch of manlets play pickups games doesn't mean the talent pool is larger.

Most people aren't genetically gifted enough to play any sport professionally. Whether it's height, girth, agility, strength. Every sport has physical barriers.


Football is more dependent on athleticism, which means it should be harder to go pro than in a sport where genetics don't matter as much (i.e. baseball). Just like you can't train height, you can't train arm length, and you only train so much to increase speed. If you were born fat, slow, weak, short, you could still play pro baseball; you aren't playing pro football.

Let me guess, football is your favorite sport? There are a number of African, Australian, European dude's that had never even played the sport in their lives and still made an NFL roster with a nice pay check to boot. Like I said it has the smallest learning curve out of any major sport.


Baseball has a farm system that the NFL doesn't. If you don't get drafted out of college and find success in the next 2-3 years, chances are you aren't making it. You can also play baseball for a lot longer than you can play football. Potentially longer career = more chances to go pro. You could make it on a major league team @ 28, but you aren't going to the combine that old.

NFL players use the CFL and Arena Football in the same way MLB using the farm system. See Doug Flutie among others.

KryptonKnight
02-20-2014, 05:18 PM
Most people aren't genetically gifted enough to play any sport professionally. Whether it's height, girth, agility, strength. Every sport has physical barriers.

Nobody said sports don't have physical barriers, but of the 4 in question, football and basketball have much higher barriers. You can be a small manlet and play baseball. You can't be a small manlet and play basketball in this day and age, and you certainly can't be one and play football without having extraordinary speed and agility (i.e.Trindon Holliday), and are then delegated to niche playing at best.

You also made the mistake of combining those barriers. Agility is not a prerequisite for playing baseball nor is manmore height a prerequisite to play hockey, or baseball for that matter. Agility can be improved; girth (i.e. size, mass) can be increased; strength can be trained for and increased. Height cannot, and for the most part neither can linear speed, especially if you don't have the genes for it.



Let me guess, football is your favorite sport? There are a number of African, Australian, European dude's that had never even played the sport in their lives and still made an NFL roster with a nice pay check to boot. Like I said it has the smallest learning curve out of any major sport.

No, there is not a "number", there is a very small few. Your strawman argument also negated the fact that those players still have the genetic potential to make it in the league. Of course the learning curve, on average, might be higher for certain positions in sports where genetics aren't the determining factor. That's the point: players have to differentiate themselves technically if the physical differences don't matter as much. Basketball also has genetic requirements AND a fairly high learning curve, but I noticed you neglected to mention that.

You can't lump all of the positions in football under one umbrella and claim they have the same learning curve. Positions like center and quarterback have much higher learning curves than something like punter or kicker. It's probably universally harder to learn how to play QB than it is to play in the outfield.



NFL players use the CFL and Arena Football in the same way MLB using the farm system. See Doug Flutie among others.

Not sure if troll or especially stupid (or both). The number of CFL or AFL players in the NFL on final 53 man rosters is so small it's statistically insignificant. It's already been said that if you don't get drafted out of college or happen to get signed as an UDFA right after, the odds of you making it in the league are astronomically against you. Some of the guys that do get drafted/signed don't make it, and get cut before the season starts.

sonnicc88
02-20-2014, 05:49 PM
Baseball requires the most skill

Obviously mlb followed by nba

3nt3r51l3nc3
02-20-2014, 07:25 PM
all of the sports are weird in this way...

NHL- high skill but less people competing for pro teams so higher chance to make it as well as multiple leagues
MLB- tons of double A, triple A, teams and opportunities but takes a ton of skill and natural ability plus u compete with basically everyone in the world.
NFL- size/athleticism can give you an edge over skilled players, only one league and no semi-pro type of leagues (not counting arena fb)
NBA- size/athleticism can give you an edge over skilled players and also the opportunity to play overseas

Machuka
02-20-2014, 09:11 PM
Unless you've played since 3 years old or are a Dominican genetic freak, MLB is the hardest sport to go pro in. Such a large pool of talent in US and outside that many players get looked over. Genetics does play a factor to whoever thinks otherwise. If I was 2-3 inches taller I could probably get into low/mid 90s on my fastball. The difference between a low Division 1 school and a high one or even a higher draft pick.

I would say that making it into EPL, La Liga, Serie A, or Bundesliga are the hardest in the world based on sheer numbers and skill.

For me:
MLB:
NHL: same argument with baseball, but with smaller pool
NBA: only issue here is that if you're a manlet, it's near impossible to make it
NFL: strength/power train properly and i feel like you could make it on a roster

KryptonKnight
02-20-2014, 10:09 PM
Unless you've played since 3 years old or are a Dominican genetic freak, MLB is the hardest sport to go pro in. Such a large pool of talent in US and outside that many players get looked over. Genetics does play a factor to whoever thinks otherwise. If I was 2-3 inches taller I could probably get into low/mid 90s on my fastball. The difference between a low Division 1 school and a high one or even a higher draft pick.

I would say that making it into EPL, La Liga, Serie A, or Bundesliga are the hardest in the world based on sheer numbers and skill.

For me:
MLB:
NHL: same argument with baseball, but with smaller pool
NBA: only issue here is that if you're a manlet, it's near impossible to make it
NFL: strength/power train properly and i feel like you could make it on a roster


LOL. 3 years old. Kids don't even play tee ball until 4 or 5.

If you were 2-3 inches taller you would still be too short for the NBA, regardless of position. Let us be real though, baseball is the one sport (of these 4) where genetics matter the least. So many fat, out of shape, DYEL baseball players that it's not even funny. Not saying it can't be a factor or play a role, but nobody is automatically out because they're not 6'5", unlike basketball.

Vast majority of people ITT think that larger talent pool equals harder. Not true. The fact that the talent pool is larger means that there is actually a larger amount of people that could make it, even though the large majority of them won't. Seems like applying to a big state school(MLB) vs. an Ivy (NBA). The state school may get more applicants, but it also has larger enrollment numbers and the requirements aren't as strict. Most of the population wouldn't even really "qualify" to apply to the Ivy, and a lot of the qualified people still don't get in.

Think of it this way, there are more people around the globe that could play baseball because you don't have to 6'5"; you don't have to be 300 lbs. and rep 225 30 times; you don't have to run a 4.4 forty; you don't need to be able to kick a 50+ yd FG or throw a spiral 70 yards; you don't need a combination of several of the above and the skill/knowledge to play the position; you don't have to be able to ice skate forwards and backwards; you don't need to be able to take a hit from a much larger human being traveling at full speed, dust yourself off, and go back for more. You just need to be able to accurately throw and hit a baseball. Some people will need to catch it, and some will have to throw it faster than others. That's it. You don't need access to ice or expensive equipment. All you need is a glove, a stick, and a baseball.

The reason these poverty sports (baseball, soccer) have so many aspiring players is because they have the lowest barriers to entry, physically and financially. Most basketball players could probably play baseball, but most baseball players can't play pro basketball. Not even accounting for actual skill, most football players don't have the height to be in the NBA, but they could probably take the physical pounding of playing in the NHL. Most NHL players are probably on par if not above the fitness levels found in the majority of major league clubs. The vast majority of pro baseball players couldn't successfully transition from MLB to the NBA or NFL. They just don't have it physically.

The OP didn't ask about MLS, but soccer is even worse that baseball in those respects: don't need manmore height, superhuman speed, size, strength, or a lot of money to play and excel, just technical skills and the endurance play 90+ minutes. A comprehensive world fitness test census would prove my point here. There's a reason the sport isn't dominated by huge bber-looking dudes and manmores of peace.



tl;dr: The right answer is whichever sports have the hardest physical trait requirements, in descending order, since most of the physical stuff cannot be trained or coached. Technical skill, while not something everyone can master, can at least be learned. Equipment and ice time can be donated, height and fast twitch muscle fibers cannot. Thus, NBA, NFL, NHL, MLB.

travellingbrah
02-20-2014, 10:32 PM
Nobody said sports don't have physical barriers, but of the 4 in question, football and basketball have much higher barriers. You can be a small manlet and play baseball. You can't be a small manlet and play basketball in this day and age, and you certainly can't be one and play football without having extraordinary speed and agility (i.e.Trindon Holliday), and are then delegated to niche playing at best.

Yes you can, see JJ Barea, Luke Ridnour, Early Boykins, Nate Robinson, Issiah Thomas among others. You absolutely can be small and still make it in the NBA. Same goes for the NFL. I could name dozens of guys under 6' in the NFL.



No, there is not a "number", there is a very small few. Your strawman argument also negated the fact that those players still have the genetic potential to make it in the league. Of course the learning curve, on average, might be higher for certain positions in sports where genetics aren't the determining factor. That's the point: players have to differentiate themselves technically if the physical differences don't matter as much. Basketball also has genetic requirements AND a fairly high learning curve, but I noticed you neglected to mention that.

First off that's not a straw man argument. I'm providing examples that back up the assertion I've made. Football has the shortest learning curve out of any of the sports mentioned (QB is an exception). That's not up of debate. Every sport has genetic requirements. If you don't have the size and strength in any sport you're going to need something else to make up for it. Something else, that most people don't have.

Your entire argument is predicated on height requirements while not looking at the arbitrary/exclusive requirements other sports have that are just harder to gauge, not as apparent. If you don't have elite hand eye coordination you're never going to make it to the MLB. Yes you can improve these traits but there are still genetic limits. And everyone that is playing the sport is working to maximize those genetic limits.


The OP didn't ask about MLS, but soccer is even worse that baseball in those respects: don't need manmore height, superhuman speed, size, strength, or a lot of money to play and excel, just technical skills and the endurance play 90+ minutes. A comprehensive world fitness test census would prove my point here. There's a reason the sport isn't dominated by huge bber-looking dudes and manmores of peace.

Soccer has an incredibly high athletic barrier, most people won't ever be athletic enough to make it to the top level. You come across as someone who bases athleticism on size/physique which is incredibly stupid. You know another sport that isn't dominated by manmore's, sprinting or gymnastics. I guess those sports don't have high physical barrier either.


Basketball also has genetic requirements AND a fairly high learning curve, but I noticed you neglected to mention that.

It's almost like you're forgetting who you're arguing with and arguing just for the sake of it. Basketball is the hardest sport to make it in on my list. Are you forgetting that?

My opinion stands. You have not provided anything to prove otherwise, other than nitpicking certain details.

wickedman
02-20-2014, 11:04 PM
Lol the most skilled sports would be the easiest one to go pro in...


lol misc... just lol

you can learn all the fundamentals.... in the nfl you need more then skill...you need genetics

Lol @ this post getting **** on when it is correct.

MLB might take the most "skill" and there might be a ton of people you need to beat out to get there... and that's exactly the point. Every 6 foot white guy who weights 130lbs/300lbs COULD potentially be an MLB player - and are not immediately removed from consideration (could get drafted to dick around in Single A). If you are born into this world less than 6'3" and elite level athleticism - your chances of playing in the NBA/NFL immediately drop to almost impossible. Yes it's the easiest to be born into the NBA/NFL in terms of not necessarily having real talent outside of athleticism - but the # of people who that happen to are astronomically small. Moreso in the NBA because it eliminates the obese giants with natural strength - and limits it to just the tall / super athletes. If stepping on the field at some point in your life is "going pro" than MLB is more difficult than NFL, however the chance you play for a short time and get blown up quickly is much higher in the NFL.

KryptonKnight
02-21-2014, 12:02 AM
Yes you can, see JJ Barea, Luke Ridnour, Early Boykins, Nate Robinson, Issiah Thomas among others. You absolutely can be small and still make it in the NBA. Same goes for the NFL. I could name dozens of guys under 6' in the NFL.

*Sighs* It has already been said that the short guys in the NFL aren't just manlets, they're jacked manlets that are disproportionately strong and/or fast. Under 6' in the NFL means nothing for many positions. As I also said, most of the short guys [manlets] play niche roles, like kick returner, or scatback. The manlets do not make up the majority of the sport's population.

Also, only one of those dudes you named is a manlet; one guy is 5'9", and the others are 6'+. I said can't be a small manlet and play in the NBA, not short by NBA standards. Learn how to read. For every Earl Boykins there are hundreds of players that aren't outliers.




First off that's not a straw man argument. I'm providing examples that back up the assertion I've made. Football has the shortest learning curve out of any of the sports mentioned (QB is an exception). That's not up of debate. Every sport has genetic requirements. If you don't have the size and strength in any sport you're going to need something else to make up for it. Something else, that most people don't have.

Maybe you just suck at football brah? Pretty sure there are a lot of football positions with higher learning curves. You've obviously never seen an NFL playbook or you'd realize the learning curve is a lot higher (this includes the football knowledge needed to play the postition) for skill positions like WR or CB than most baseball positions barring catcher and pitcher.

Every sport does not have genetic requirements. Preferrences for certain positions? Sure. Not the same as not being able to play competitively at the highest levels because of things like height.



Your entire argument is predicated on height requirements while not looking at the arbitrary/exclusive requirements other sports have that are just harder to gauge, not as apparent. If you don't have elite hand eye coordination you're never going to make it to the MLB. Yes you can improve these traits but there are still genetic limits. And everyone that is playing the sport is working to maximize those genetic limits.

Reading comprehension not even once. Part of my entire argument is predicated on height requirements, which cannot be trained or coached. Hand/eye coordination is key in all these sports, but sports like basketball and football also require endurance, strength/ vert, agility, linear speed, etc. on far a greater scale than the game of baseball does. There are reasons basketball players tend to be ripped or wiry, regardless of height, and football players tend to be jacked, while many baseball players don't even look like athletes.



Soccer has an incredibly high athletic barrier, most people won't ever be athletic enough to make it to the top level. You come across as someone who bases athleticism on size/physique which is incredibly stupid. You know another sport that isn't dominated by manmore's, sprinting or gymnastics. I guess those sports don't have high physical barrier either.

Wow, you really are dumb. You telling me most pro basketball or football players couldn't play soccer if they wanted too? GTFOH. Soccer is pure endurance and speed/agility, but the athletic barrier is not "incredibly high". Higher than most fatass/ordinary obese people could surpass, of course, but not for actual athletes. Higher than bball? No. Football? No. Hockey? No. Sprinting? No. Baseball? Maybe. These other sports actually require far greater levels of athleticism than soccer does.

Soccer players aren't the fastest, strongest, most flexible, shiftiest, whatever, nor do they have the best cardiovascular conditioning. There is no category of physical prowess that soccer players can boast to be the best in. Logically, that means the "incredibly high athletic barriers" are actually lower than that of other sports which do possess those athletes.

KryptonKnight
02-21-2014, 12:12 AM
Lol @ this post getting **** on when it is correct.

Every 6 foot white guy who weights 130lbs/300lbs COULD potentially be an MLB player - and are not immediately removed from consideration. If you are born into this world less than 6'3" and elite level athleticism - your chances of playing in the NBA/NFL immediately drop to almost impossible.

No, actually that's wrong, by your own logic no less.

Since every sub-6 foot white guy COULD potentially be an MLB player, it should actually be easier to make it in the MLB since for those born into this world less than 6'3" and elite level athleticism their chances of playing in the NBA/NFL immediately drop to almost impossible. In terms of percents, COULD >>> almost impossible.

wickedman
02-21-2014, 01:33 AM
No, actually that's wrong, by your own logic no less.

Since every sub-6 foot white guy COULD potentially be an MLB player, it should actually be easier to make it in the MLB since for those born into this world less than 6'3" and elite level athleticism their chances of playing in the NBA/NFL immediately drop to almost impossible. In terms of percents, COULD >>> almost impossible.

From what I can tell, you are agreeing with me.

KryptonKnight
02-21-2014, 10:14 AM
From what I can tell, you are agreeing with me.

Not exactly. Chances are still greater IMO that you could step foot on an MLB field before making onto NFL turf. You basically have to have the genes given to you at birth, make it through 3-4 years at a D-1 school, ball well enough to get noticed, not blow it at the combine, and then make through the draft and training camp. If you make it pass OTAs and camp without being signed/practice squadding your rookie season, really good chance your career is already over.

I do agree that "it's easiest to be born into the NBA/NFL in terms of not necessarily having real talent outside of athleticism - but the # of people who that happen to are astronomically small". So many people unfamiliar with the nuances of football/basketball think it's all about size or strength, and fail to realize there is someone out there with better strength/ 40 speed/ vert/ wingspan/ whatever who wants that roster spot just as much.

JaxBrah
02-21-2014, 11:21 AM
Depends on what you mean. NBA would statistically have the smallest percentage of the national population playing for it but thats only because of how small the rosters are.

Id say MLB is probably the most difficult because it is by far the most "skilled" based of those listed. Purely having a natural born athleticism can make you a superstar in the nba and nfl, whereas in the MLB that can mean almost nothing. Theres more craft to baseball than those 2 leagues and takes far more dedicated work to master.

JaxBrah
02-21-2014, 01:03 PM
There's AAU basketball everywhere.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_in_the_United_States#Popular_team_sports
Basketball is also played more in a non organized level (i.e. pickup). Soccer and probably football are also played more than baseball in that respect.

Also, baseball can hardly be considered a real sport. It's in the same realm as Sumo imo, both national past times of their respective countries, both only require 5 seconds of effort.

IF sport was defined as nothing but physical endurance than you would be right. But you are completely missing everything else that constitutes athletic performance. Such has hand eye coordination, tactics and adjustments, repetition, reaction time, ect. Baseball actually requires far more athletic qualities than basketball so if anything its more of a sport than basketball. Throwing a MLB capable curveball takes more practice and is more difficult than anything you will ever do in basketball

And to the other guy who claimed nhl required most coordination is dead wrong. Connecting on a 100mph fastball is far more difficult than hitting a stationary puck or deflecting a shot every so often. Not even to mention trying to connect on an 84mph nasty curveball riggt after seeing a 100mph fastball.

ShweezyBTFO
02-21-2014, 01:48 PM
Depends on what you mean. NBA would statistically have the smallest percentage of the national population playing for it but thats only because of how small the rosters are.

Id say MLB is probably the most difficult because it is by far the most "skilled" based of those listed. Purely having a natural born athleticism can make you a superstar in the nba and nfl, whereas in the MLB that can mean almost nothing. Theres more craft to baseball than those 2 leagues and takes far more dedicated work to master.

This.




The poll is misleading. It should really be 2 separate questions:


1. Which one is the hardest to make it to as a member of a D1 college team?

Easily basketball since this question takes the general population into account. Plus it's not impossible to walk on to many D1 baseball/football teams because the rosters are huge.

2. Which sport is the hardest for a college athlete to reach the top pro league? (i.e., NFL instead of CFL, NBA instead of NBDL, MLB instead of minors)




There have been several publicized stories of NBDL players making it to the NBA (Lin for one, a few others too based on that ridiculous NBDL commercials I keep seeing). Being a #1 or #2 option at a mid-major (or better) NCAA D1 program will at least give you a shot at the NBA.












None of this is the same with the MLB. There are more hoops to jump through and being the best college anything is meaningless. Oh so you can hit a straight fastball? That's cool, let's see what happens when you face pitchers who can change speeds with movement + control.





LMAO @ Hoop_dreams' posts ITT.

Machuka
02-21-2014, 08:38 PM
Would love to see Lebron get a hit off of Sabathia.

Likewise would love to see Sabathia geta shot off against Lebron.

Would love to see Peyton defend Messi.

Would love to see Messi throw a 40 yrd beauty.

all these arguments are potato without specific boundaries or scenarios.

travellingbrah
02-21-2014, 09:05 PM
*Sighs* It has already been said that the short guys in the NFL aren't just manlets, they're jacked manlets that are disproportionately strong and/or fast.

Because they spend all day lifting. Most football players are just good athletes like any other sport, there's just far more emphasis on lifting and strength training, so they are jacked. Your body is a reflection of your training habits, these guys weren't born that way, they worked for it.


Under 6' in the NFL means nothing for many positions. As I also said, most of the short guys [manlets] play niche roles, like kick returner, or scatback. The manlets do not make up the majority of the sport's population.

So they don't count as NFL players? We're talking about which league is the easiest to get into, so these positions count the same as any other.




Maybe you just suck at football brah? Pretty sure there are a lot of football positions with higher learning curves. You've obviously never seen an NFL playbook or you'd realize the learning curve is a lot higher (this includes the football knowledge needed to play the postition) for skill positions like WR or CB than most baseball positions barring catcher and pitcher.

Name me another sport that has people getting professional contracts without ever even playing before? I'll be waiting... I get it, football is your baby and you can't see it without bias.


Every sport does not have genetic requirements. Preferrences for certain positions? Sure. Not the same as not being able to play competitively at the highest levels because of things like height.

Every sport most certainly has g enetic requirements. They just aren't as obvious as something like height...



Reading comprehension not even once. Part of my entire argument is predicated on height requirements, which cannot be trained or coached. Hand/eye coordination is key in all these sports, but sports like basketball and football also require endurance, strength/ vert, agility, linear speed, etc. on far a greater scale than the game of baseball does. There are reasons basketball players tend to be ripped or wiry, regardless of height, and football players tend to be jacked, while many baseball players don't even look like athletes.

You're right it's not your entire argument. The other part of your argument is completely predicated on your biases. Oh, well, because you said so, guy on the internet.



Wow, you really are dumb. You telling me most pro basketball or football players couldn't play soccer if they wanted too? GTFOH. Soccer is pure endurance and speed/agility, but the athletic barrier is not "incredibly high". Higher than most fatass/ordinary obese people could surpass, of course, but not for actual athletes. Higher than bball? No. Football? No. Hockey? No. Sprinting? No. Baseball? Maybe. These other sports actually require far greater levels of athleticism than soccer does.

Yes, soccer is the most competitive sport in the world, no sport comes close to the number of competitors soccer see's, to be the best you have to be the elite of the elite. Football is played only in America, the talent pool is a drop in bucket in comparison. The athletic barriers of soccer are way higher than baseball or hockey. It's laughable you would say otherwise and makes it very clear you have no idea what you're talking about. Find me one hockey player that dominated track in their youth? One, because i can find dozens of soccer players who have..Soccer is about on par with basketball, with football valuing athleticism more than any other.


Soccer players aren't the fastest, strongest, most flexible, shiftiest, whatever, nor do they have the best cardiovascular conditioning. Logically, that means the "incredibly high athletic barriers" are actually lower than that of other sports which do possess those athletes.

Your word isn't going to win you any arguments. "Oh guys see, my observations are more keen than yours, therefore I'm right." You have no idea what you're talking about,. I admire your charming teenage arrogance though. It's funny how you aren't actually arguing the order with which I put the sports in, rather nitpicking minute details and missing the entire point of this discussion because you think you hold some level of knowledge over others, which you very clearly don't.


There is no category of physical prowess that soccer players can boast to be the best in.

Agility. Even a biased ass American website can't deny that.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/sportSkills

KryptonKnight
02-21-2014, 09:55 PM
You are so ****ing dumb this debate isn't even fun.


Because they spend all day lifting. Most football players are just good athletes like any other sport, they just spend more time lifting, so they get jacked. Your body is a reflection of your training habits, these guys weren't born jacked.

You missed the point brah. The manlets in the NFL aren't slow or scrawny like manlets in other sports, they include some of the fastest athletes on the planet and they are disproportionately strong to boot. The guys obviously aren't born jacked, but a vast majority have the genetic potential to be more jacked than most people, even more that good number of athletes from other sports.



So they don't count as NFL players? We're talking about which league is the easiest to get into, so these positions count the same as any other.

Not what I said. All my comment means is that being 6'+ plus is irrelevant for several positions in football: K/PR, RB, CB. Height is usually an advantage in football, but not having it at those positions is not necessarily a disadvantage, nor would it hinder somebody from being drafted. Compare this to basketball where 6' is basically midget territory.



Name me another sport that has people getting professional contracts without ever even playing before? I'll be waiting... I get it, football is your baby and you can't see it without bias.

Football being my favorite sport has nothing to do with it. The people you are referring to are extremely rare cases, and they are all genetic freaks who. Furthermore, those people usually do not excel when compared to other genetic freaks that have played football so I'm not really sure what that has to do with anything. You didn't support this statement with any examples so I'll just take your word for it.



Every sport most certainly has g enetic requirements. They just aren't as obvious as something like height...

Whatever helps you sleep at night. You didn't support this statement with any examples either.



You're right it's not your entire argument. The other part of your argument is completely predicated on your biases. Oh, well, because you said so, guy on the internet.

Pot calling the kettle black.



Yes, soccer is the most competitive sport in the world, no sport comes close to the numbers soccer see's, so to be the best you have to be the elite of the elite. Football is played only in America, the talent pool is a drop in bucket in comparison. Please don't talk about soccer, it's amusing but you clearly have no idea what you're talking about.

Poverty ball is the most popular sport on the planet because the financial and genetic requirements to play are the lowest of any sport. The only sport cheaper to play would be track (not field). Football equipment is expensive and to play at the highest level you almost have to be a physical freak. If you honestly think NFL/NBA players couldn't play pro soccer then you, good sir, are an idiot. The reason they don't is simple: the money isn't there. This is America, and America doesn't give two ****s about professional soccer. If players in the MLS made tens of millions of dollars a year, bet your ass you'd have football and basketball players who couldn't make it the NFL or NBA playing soccer.



Oh because you said so, lol. That's what he call empirical evidence, lol. It isn't going to win you any arguments. "Oh guys see, my observations are more keen than yours, therefore I'm right. Amusing teenage arrogance. You have no idea what you're talking about. I admire your charming teenage arrogance though. It's funny how you aren't actually arguing the order with which I put the sports in, rather nitpick minute details and missing the entire point of this discussion because you think you hold some level of knowledge over others, which you very clearly don't.

Spell check not even once. Your syntax and diction are also poor.

I'm not a teenager phaggot, so any 'arrogance' I have is purely adult. Your claims are not based on any scientific reasoning either dumbass, thus they are also empirical. Furthermore, I actually am arguing that the order in which you put the sports in is wrong, and I never said it was right. My argument is that it's not NBA, MLB, NFL, NHL (your order), but NBA, NFL, NHL, MLB (my order).

Oh well, believe what you want.

travellingbrah
02-21-2014, 10:04 PM
You are so ****ing dumb this debate isn't even fun.

Pretty telling that you start out with insults. You're getting frustrated because you're failing to get your point across. That's not my fault.


You missed the point brah. The manlets in the NFL aren't slow or scrawny like manlets in other sports, they include some of the fastest athletes on the planet and they are disproportionately strong to boot. The guys obviously aren't born jacked, but a vast majority have the genetic potential to be more jacked than most people, even more that good number of athletes from other sports.

What manlets in other sports are slow and scrawny? This is getting so far away from the point of this thread.


Football being my favorite sport has nothing to do with it. The people you are referring to are extremely rare cases, and they are all genetic freaks who. Furthermore, those people usually do not excel when compared to other genetic freaks that have played football so I'm not really sure what that has to do with anything. You didn't support this statement with any examples so I'll just take your word for it.

So you're not biased at all huh? I'm pretty sure football being your favorite sport does have something to do with it...


Poverty ball is the most popular sport on the planet because the financial and genetic requirements to play are the lowest of any sport.

Everyone knows that, the fact that it is more accessible than any other sport means that it's more accessible for everyone. Including the best athletes.


The only sport cheaper to play would be track (not field). Football equipment is expensive and to play at the highest level you almost have to be a physical freak. If you honestly think NFL/NBA players couldn't play pro soccer then you, good sir, are an idiot.

Really convincing stuff.


The reason they don't is simple: the money isn't there. This is America, and America doesn't give two ****s about professional soccer. If players in the MLS made tens of millions of dollars a year, bet your ass you'd have football and basketball players who couldn't make it the NFL or NBA playing soccer.

The phuck is your point? How is this relevant to the conversation at hand at all.



Spell check not even once. Your syntax and diction are also poor.

Clutching at straws once again. Stay on topic. Are you capable of that?


I'm not a teenager phaggot, so any 'arrogance' I have is purely adult.

That's embarrassing.


Your claims are not based on any scientific reasoning either dumbass, thus they are also empirical. Furthermore, I actually am arguing that the order in which you put the sports in is wrong, and I never said it was right. My argument is that it's not NBA, MLB, NFL, NHL (your order), but NBA, NFL, NHL, MLB (my order).

Well you haven't done anything to prove your stance. Your criticisms are all over the place, it isn't even clear what exactly you are arguing other than the minute, irrelevant details you can get your claws on.


Oh well, believe what you want.

Likewise.

And negged, because when push comes to shove you don't actually have anything to say. You haven't even made a point in all your ramblings. You're better at criticizing other people's points than standing up for your own because it's a lot easier to do.

I'll lay out all the questions I asked that you conveniently glossed over.

Name me another sport that has people getting professional contracts without ever even playing before?

Find me one hockey player that dominated track in their youth? One, because i can find dozens of soccer players who have..

Lol'd hard when you implied baseball and hockey are more athletic sports than soccer. That was funny.

rjones416
02-22-2014, 12:16 AM
if you arent black and over 6'3 then your chances of making the nba are 0.00000000350%

ShweezyBTFO
02-22-2014, 12:29 AM
if you arent black and over 6'3 then your chances of making the nba are 0.00000000350%

http://exnba.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/john-stockton.jpg

http://content.draftexpress.com/gallery/JimmerFredette/1296617189.jpg


http://chasing23.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Jose-Juan-Barea.jpg

BillTheBro
02-22-2014, 05:32 AM
Lol at anyone saying MLB first


that sport is just a sad joke

rootcon
02-22-2014, 05:35 AM
Lol at anyone saying MLB first


that sport is just a sad joke

I don't know about the other sports, but MLB has to be the easiest. Someone from my HS was almost called up in to the majors for f's sake, and I live in bum**** vermont