PDA

View Full Version : Thoughts/Critique on my diet plan?



brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 08:10 AM
Just would like to hear what you think on my diet plan I recently constructed. I started this plan on Monday when I also started the Jay Culter Living Large program. The number in parenthesis indicated the amount of protein in the food. Thanks in advance for the tips/info.

Breakfast:
3 whole eggs (3)
4 slices of toast (12)
3 tablespoons peanut butter (11)
1 glass of milk (12)

Lunch
5-6 oz Chicken Breast (30)
Can of Tuna (36)

Dinner
Varies. Always has a meat source such as chicken, steak, ham, fish, ect.

Post Workout Shake
Whey, Milk, 1 TB PB, Banana (40)

Snacks
3/4 cup of greek yogurt (15)
1/2 cup of cottage cheese (14)

This adds up to 188 g of protein not including dinner. I currently weight 215. Is this a good diet for bulking? Thank you.

Domicron
01-23-2014, 08:21 AM
How many calories is this? that's what matters for your bulk, not what you're eating

WonderPug
01-23-2014, 08:22 AM
Drop that silly program.

To start learning the basics about nutrition, please read the relevant stickies at the top of the nutrition forum.

For lifting, use a proven 5X5 program. See the relevant stickies at the top of the exercise program forum.

beastlymandude
01-23-2014, 08:24 AM
Why are you only tracking protein? You need to make sure you're getting enough calories if you want to grow and consumg enough dietary fat for overall health.

Your diet looks too low in calories and dietary fat, and it also looks boring, unvaried, and bland. I would go insane if I had to eat that every day. Vary it for maximum enjoyment and health benefits.

Go here to calculate your TDEE: http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=156380183

Add a 10-20% surplus to your TDEE if you want to bulk. Eat foods you enjoy (employ common sense and moderation), but derive the majority of your diet from whole or minimally processed foods.

Track fat, protein, and carb consumption. Ensure adequate intake of calories to gain weight. Don't forget to keep training (progressively overload major compound lifts) to build lean body mass. And drop Jay Cutler's program.

brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 08:25 AM
Appreciate the responses fellas.

Domicron, I most likely made a "rookie" mistake and looked at only the protein amount, not the caloric amount.

Wonderpug, thanks man. Will do.

WonderPug
01-23-2014, 08:28 AM
^^^ Start by reading this:

Caloric Intake

Energy balance is the primary dietary driver of body weight and it also impacts body composition. A chronic surplus of calories will result in increased body weight and a chronic deficit of calories will result in a loss of body weight.

In other words, in order to gain about one pound of tissue weight (as opposed to transient flux in water weight), you need to consume a total of about 3,500 calories more than you expend. And to lose about one pound of tissue weight, you have to do the opposite -- consume about 3,500 calories less than you expend.

Thus, the first step in constructing any rational diet is to get a sense of how many calories per day, on average, you should consume in order to progress towards your goals.

The average number of calories you expend per day -- called total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) -- is a function of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and your average weekly activity level.

To estimate your BMR, it's important to have a sense of how much lean body mass (LBM) you carry. If you're not sure, post a photo or two and we can estimate your percentage body fat and, from this number and your total body weight, it's easy to estimate LBM by using the following formula:



LBM = body weight * (1 - percentage body fat)


To estimate BMR, use the the Katch-McArdle formula:



BMR = 370 + (9.8 * LBM in pounds)
or
BMR = 370 + (21.6 * LBM in kg)


The next step is to estimate average weekly activity using the following guidelines to calculate an activity factor (AF):




• 1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

• 1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

• 1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

• 1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

• 1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.


Macronutrient Intake

Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)

brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 08:29 AM
Why are you only tracking protein? You need to make sure you're getting enough calories if you want to grow and consumg enough dietary fat for overall health.

Your diet looks too low in calories and dietary fat, and it also looks boring, unvaried, and bland. I would go insane if I had to eat that every day. Vary it for maximum enjoyment and health benefits.

Go here to calculate your TDEE:

Add a 10-20% surplus to your TDEE if you want to bulk. Eat foods you enjoy (employ common sense and moderation), but derive the majority of your diet from whole or minimally processed foods.

Track fat, protein, and carb consumption. Ensure adequate intake of calories to gain weight. Don't forget to keep training (progressively overload major compound lifts) to build lean body mass. And drop Jay Cutler's program.

I just came off a diet losing 85 lbs so I kind of cringe when I hear gain weight lol but obviously that's what bulking is. I try to eat clean and only eat foods with high protein and I sort of struggle to find foods high in calories that are healthy. It's hard for me to eat every 2-3 hours so I try to stock up on each meal.

Also, very interesting on everyone's comments about the Jay Cutler program. Didn't know it had so much negativity.

brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 09:15 AM
I counted most of the macros for the my diet which does not include dinner because it varies every night.

2038 calories
188 g protein
144 g carbs
66 g fat

Would there be any foods you recommend to eat in addition to what I have? Or to substitute/get rid of?

kencasehall
01-23-2014, 09:33 AM
I counted most of the macros for the my diet which does not include dinner because it varies every night.

2038 calories
188 g protein
144 g carbs
66 g fat

Would there be any foods you recommend to eat in addition to what I have? Or to substitute/get rid of?

I don't know how active you are, but I doub't you'll gain weight at anything less than 2500 calories given your height/weight and assuming you go to the gym

brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 09:46 AM
I don't know how active you are, but I doub't you'll gain weight at anything less than 2500 calories given your height/weight and assuming you go to the gym

I think I'm going to get rid of Greek Yogurt and cottage cheese and switch them with a cup of almonds and a cup of Black Turtle Beans every day. I get more Carbs, calories, and protein that way. Still searching for more way of switching...

WonderPug
01-23-2014, 09:50 AM
I counted most of the macros for the my diet which does not include dinner because it varies every night.

2038 calories
188 g protein
144 g carbs
66 g fat

Would there be any foods you recommend to eat in addition to what I have? Or to substitute/get rid of?Wow, that's a terrible diet.

Please see post #6 and fix your diet ASAP!!!

brandonfaggiano
01-23-2014, 09:54 AM
Wow, that's a terrible diet.

Please see post #6 and fix your diet ASAP!!!

Switching greek yogurt and cottage cheese with 1 cup of black turtle beans and 1 cup of almonds leaves me with this:

2958 calories
218 g protein
251 g carbs
113 g fat

Again this does not include dinner. At my college every meal is different. Still low on Carbs...

keramon02
01-23-2014, 09:56 AM
^^^ Start by reading this:

Caloric Intake

Energy balance is the primary dietary driver of body weight and it also impacts body composition. A chronic surplus of calories will result in increased body weight and a chronic deficit of calories will result in a loss of body weight.

In other words, in order to gain about one pound of tissue weight (as opposed to transient flux in water weight), you need to consume a total of about 3,500 calories more than you expend. And to lose about one pound of tissue weight, you have to do the opposite -- consume about 3,500 calories less than you expend.

Thus, the first step in constructing any rational diet is to get a sense of how many calories per day, on average, you should consume in order to progress towards your goals.

The average number of calories you expend per day -- called total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) -- is a function of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and your average weekly activity level.

To estimate your BMR, it's important to have a sense of how much lean body mass (LBM) you carry. If you're not sure, post a photo or two and we can estimate your percentage body fat and, from this number and your total body weight, it's easy to estimate LBM by using the following formula:



LBM = body weight * (1 - percentage body fat)


To estimate BMR, use the the Katch-McArdle formula:



BMR = 370 + (9.8 * LBM in pounds)
or
BMR = 370 + (21.6 * LBM in kg)


The next step is to estimate average weekly activity using the following guidelines to calculate an activity factor (AF):




1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.


1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.


Macronutrient Intake

Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)



Macronutrient Intake

Protein: ~0.6 to ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the highest amount justified by research. (http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)[/QUOTE]

What exactly do you mean, for fat, "implied by clinical observation"? I've seen you post this before, but I'm not sure I understand what you mean. It kinda suggests there's not really much data on dietary fat and hormones, but I'm inclined to assume that's not true. What are your thoughts on that?

kencasehall
01-23-2014, 10:11 AM
Switching greek yogurt and cottage cheese with 1 cup of black turtle beans and 1 cup of almonds leaves me with this:

2958 calories
218 g protein
251 g carbs
113 g fat

Again this does not include dinner. At my college every meal is different. Still low on Carbs...

As WonderPug stated, the remaining caloric balance can be distributed based on your preference once protein and fat are met, so you're not "low on carbs".