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View Full Version : When you cut, do you overshoot your cut weight?



lucidz
12-17-2013, 08:07 AM
I'm going to be doing a cut here in the next few months and I was curious. If you have a goal weight/fat percentage, do you overshoot your weight so that your weight will normalize when you begin to reverse diet?

IE: If you want to be 180@10% would you diet to say, 177, knowing that when you start getting more glycogen/water in your system you'll gain weight?

InItForFitness
12-17-2013, 08:12 AM
Haven't cut yet, so I couldn't give you a personal experience response.
However reading through your post, I'd have to say that your theory seems to be a reasonable one.

Not sure exactly how much of a difference it would make, but I don't seem the harm in approaching it as you've drawn out.

lucidz
12-17-2013, 08:21 AM
Haven't cut yet, so I couldn't give you a personal experience response.
However reading through your post, I'd have to say that your theory seems to be a reasonable one.

Not sure exactly how much of a difference it would make, but I don't seem the harm in approaching it as you've drawn out.

Hey dude. You're looking good btw. We both joined at the same time on this forum. Its pretty interesting to see how our respective programs have resulted after so many months.

I went for a bit more bulkiness but still have kept a pretty solid 450-500 calorie calorie surplus since may. Believe it or not, I've gained 1lb per week ever since I started the last bulk about 5 months ago.

Gxp23
12-17-2013, 08:59 AM
I will be aiming for an image, or a rough image and from there will use the mirror to decide when I am done.

Former300lber
12-17-2013, 09:06 AM
I disregard scale weight and body fat% and just cut till I am content.

saw7988
12-17-2013, 09:15 AM
If you have a specific goal weight then yes, definitely. Your weight when eating 2500 calories will likely be 1-4 lbs lighter than eating 3000 calories. But I also don't look too much into the actual scale # (although it's important for tracking progression). First, the number doesn't mean ****, if you're still fat then you're still fat. Second, the weight you THINK you'll look good at when starting a cut (unless you're experienced) is usually not low enough anyway.

lucidz
12-17-2013, 10:43 AM
If you have a specific goal weight then yes, definitely. Your weight when eating 2500 calories will likely be 1-4 lbs lighter than eating 3000 calories. But I also don't look too much into the actual scale # (although it's important for tracking progression). First, the number doesn't mean ****, if you're still fat then you're still fat. Second, the weight you THINK you'll look good at when starting a cut (unless you're experienced) is usually not low enough anyway.

My problem is getting accurate fat % measurements with water weight as a consideration. If I want to look lean at particular weight, I would think, I need to overshoot that weight with regards to actual size/weight, because as soon as I resume a full carb/full calorie diet, i'm sure to put some moisture weight/saturation back on.