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deosaa7
09-01-2013, 09:54 AM
The sticky says:


General 'bodybuilding' guidelines for protein as follows:
- Moderate bodyfat, Moderate training load, moderate calorie = 2.0-2.6g per kg TOTAL weight (about 0.9-1.2g per pound)
- Low bodyfat or Very Low Calorie, Low Carb, High training load = 2.2-3g per kg TOTAL weight (1.0-1.35g per pound)
- High bodyfat, high calorie, Low training load = 1.6 to 2.2g per kg TOTAL weight (.75-1g per pound)

the DCA thread says:


Quick example:

-200lb man at 20% body fat wants to lose weight

-Maintenance calories: 3000

-Calories to cut: 2400

-1.5g protein per lb/LBM: (1.5 * 160) 240g

-0.45g fat per lb/BW: (200 * 0.45) 90g

-Calories from fats + protein minimums: (240 * 4) + (90 * 9) = 1770

-Calories from reaching minimums taken from calories to cut: (2400 - 1770) 630


I'm currently at ~18% bodyfat. If my bodyweight is 160 pounds, I should eat 160 grams of protein according the the sticky. The DCA thread leads me to believe I should be eating (160-(.18*160))*1.5 = 196.8 grams of protein.

That's almost 40 grams more than the sticky. I'm not sure which source I should follow? Does it even matter? I find that it's pretty easy for me to hit 120 grams per day but every 30 grams after that is increasingly difficult. In the end of the day, I will do whatever is best for results.

If I follow the sticky, I think my macros should be:
1826 cal 65F, 152.5C, 160P

If I use the DCA thread my macros would be:
1826 cal 72F, 97.7C, 197P

I appreciate any advice.

PBateman2
09-01-2013, 10:15 AM
Follow the sticky.

Protein at 160g is fine.

WonderPug
09-01-2013, 10:54 AM
Macronutrient Intake


Protein: ~0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the highest amount justified by research. ([url=http://mennohenselmans.com/the-myth-of-1glb-optimal-protein-intake-for-bodybuilders/)

Fat: ~0.45 grams per pound of bodyweight -- the lowest amount implied by clinical observation.

Remaining caloric budget: whatever mix of macronutrients you prefer -- as implied by research. (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748)



Caloric Intake

Energy balance is the primary dietary driver of body weight and it also impacts body composition. A chronic surplus of calories will result in increased body weight and a chronic deficit of calories will result in a loss of body weight.

In other words, in order to gain about one pound of tissue weight (as opposed to transient flux in water weight), you need to consume a total of about 3,500 calories more than you expend. And to lose about one pound of tissue weight, you have to do the opposite -- consume about 3,500 calories less than you expend.

Thus, the first step in constructing any rational diet is to get a sense of how many calories per day, on average, you should consume in order to progress towards your goals.

The average number of calories you expend per day -- called total daily energy intake (TDEE) -- is a function of your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and your average weekly activity level.

To estimate your BMR, it's important to have a sense of how much lean body mass (LBM) you carry. If you're not sure, post a photo or two and we can estimate your percentage body fat and, from this number and your total body weight, it's easy to estimate LBM by using the following formula:



LBM = body weight * (1 - percentage body fat)


To estimate BMR, use the the Katch-McArdle formula:



BMR = 370 + (9.8 * LBM in pounds)
or
BMR = 370 + (21.6 * LBM in kg)


The next step is to estimate average weekly activity using the following guidelines to calculate an activity factor (AF):




• 1.1 - 1.2 = Sedentary (desk job, and little formal exercise, this will be most of you students)

• 1.3 - 1.4 = Lightly Active (light daily activity and light exercise 1-3 days a week)

• 1.5 - 1.6 = Moderately Active (moderately daily Activity & moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)

• 1.7 - 1.8 = Very Active (physically demanding lifestyle & hard exercise 6-7 days a week)

• 1.9 - 2.2 = Extremely Active (athletes in endurance training or very hard physical job)




To estimate TDEE (the calories at which you will neither gain nor lose tissue weight), use the following formula:



TDEE = BMR * AF


Now that you've estimated your TDEE, it's important to refine that estimate empirically. To do so, consume an average amount of calories equal to estimated TDEE for two weeks, monitoring weight change. The results will confirm your actual TDEE.

Once you know your actually TDEE, set your caloric intake to match your goals as follows:



To maintain weight, consume an amount of calories equal to TDEE.
To lose weight, consume 10% to 20% less than TDEE.
To gain weight, consume 10% 20 20% more than TDEE.


Monitor weight change via the scale and also body composition via the mirror and how clothing fits, making adjustments as needed biweekly.

deosaa7
09-01-2013, 11:29 AM
I dont want to quote the entire post above and thanks for posting that but I believe that's from the sticky..I did use that and figured out my calories to take cut on are ~1850ish (TDEE = 2318) which is what I have for both methods. I was just trying to figure out if the macros mattered between the two..197P / 100C vs 160P / 150C

WonderPug
09-01-2013, 11:38 AM
I dont want to quote the entire post above and thanks for posting that but I believe that's from the stickyThe recommendations are different and are based on my interpretation of relevant research.

deosaa7
09-02-2013, 07:27 PM
Follow the sticky.

Protein at 160g is fine.

Thanks I will follow this:

1826 cal 65F, 152.5C, 160P


I was just afraid because till now, I have stuck to low carbs when cutting (usually around 50g, maxing out at 75g) so eating twice that does seem frightening. I just need to trust as long as I hit my macros and am in a deficit and continue my training, I should lose fat.

softpounder
09-02-2013, 10:37 PM
Thanks I will follow this:

1826 cal 65F, 152.5C, 160P


I was just afraid because till now, I have stuck to low carbs when cutting (usually around 50g, maxing out at 75g) so eating twice that does seem frightening. I just need to trust as long as I hit my macros and am in a deficit and continue my training, I should lose fat.

Correct.