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View Full Version : Question about BioLayne's video on 'Metabolic Capacity'



cls91
08-22-2013, 06:20 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EY1DsZMNfNw

He commonly refers to someone eating 800 calories and doing 2 hours of cardio, for example. And to recover from this crashed metabolism, they should very slowly increase their caloric intake on a daily/weekly basis.

My question...

Is the idea that increasing your caloric intake is necessary to recover your metabolism, but will result in short-term weight gain, with the goal of cutting that weight in the long-term when your metabolism has recovered?

Or is the idea that by very slowly increasing your caloric intake (lets say 25cal/week), you will be increasing your metabolic capacity simultaneously, so that theoretically your maintenance will increase by the same 25cal/week, resulting in zero/minimal weight gain?

WonderPug
08-22-2013, 06:22 AM
It's the latter, but the increase should be ~100 calories.

cls91
08-22-2013, 06:25 AM
It's the latter, but the increase should be ~100 calories.

100 cal per week?

The reason Im asking is because I'd like to try and increase my metabolic capacity (current maintenance is 2000-2200), but I don't think I have a 'crashed metabolism' right now. So by increasing my calories very slowly, I will go through a period that wouldn't be a bulk/cut, but would maintain my weight and increase metabolic capacity, for the benefit of long-term bulk/cut goals.


EDIT: can this method be used to increase a metabolic capacity beyond a 'normal' limit? Or should it only be used to recover from a slowed metabolism?

WonderPug
08-22-2013, 06:27 AM
Unless you've significantly suppressed BMR because of chronic and absurdly deficient intake of nutrients, there's nothing to be gained from doing what you propose.

What's your BMR and activity factor, by the way.

lee__d
08-22-2013, 06:29 AM
I think I side with Lyle here in that if one were truly under eating like this, they should hop back up to maintenance asap, instead of wasting time slowly reverse dieting (thus staying in a deficit). Because if one actually consumed such a low intake and did so much cardio, they really could be hurting themselves.

Of course their maintenance may be low anyway with being lean from prepping and what not, so yea, weight gain will happen if they make a big jump.

And also, the scenario of one actually eating 800 calories and doing tons of activity is very very unlikely regardless of what their emails say.

That said, I do like the idea of reverse dieting, because one's metabolism probably isn't permanently damaged anyway. Also, we have plenty of anecdotal evidence of competitors slowly adding calories after a show and appearing leaner. So, slowly adding calories can have some body composition advantages.

cls91
08-22-2013, 06:30 AM
Unless you've significantly suppressed BMR because of chronic and absurdly deficient intake of nutrients, there's nothing to be gained from doing what you propose.

What's your BMR and activity factor, by the way.

BMR is 1500, activity factor varies greatly by day, but by trial and error I've found my maintenance to be between 2000-2200.
I would like to increase my maintenance to around 2500, which is why I was asking if metabolic capacity can be increased for 'normal' metabolisms, or just as a recover method for people who were deficient.

Thanks for all the help btw, repped.

WonderPug
08-22-2013, 06:31 AM
So your TDEE (found empirically) is close to your predicted TDEE, right?

cls91
08-22-2013, 06:36 AM
So your TDEE (found empirically) is close to your predicted TDEE, right?

Quite close. Are your getting to the point that I'm not able to increase my TDEE beyond that of whats 'predicted' for me? Would weight-gain (bulking) then be necessary instead of maintenance with 'metabolic recovery'?

WonderPug
08-22-2013, 06:57 AM
Quite close. Are your getting to the point that I'm not able to increase my TDEE beyond that of whats 'predicted' for me? Would weight-gain (bulking) then be necessary instead of maintenance with 'metabolic recovery'?If you're close the predicted TDEE, then your (legal) options are to increase activity and/or increase lean body mass.


Think of it this way. If you break your arm, a cast will help it heal and return to its prior bone strength. However, if your arm is fine, a cast will not make your arm stronger than it is now.