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View Full Version : My calories and macros - advice needed



feelix
06-17-2013, 10:55 AM
Hi,

I started training seriously for the first time of my life about 4 months ago. I've been training 3 times a week, mainly circuit training and light cardio.

Concerning my diet, I have been following these values:

calories: 2000
proteins: ~175 g
fat : ~ 75 g
carbs : ~175 g

I managed to lose 14 pounds of fat and gained 3.5 pounds of lean body mass which is what I wanted (lose fat and minimize muscle loss)


However, I will start a new workout plan in 2 days and I will be training 6 days a week (around 1.5 hour/day) and will be doing a lot more cardio too. So I am wondering if my values are still ok or if I should modify them ? I also work 45-50 hours+ per week as a waiter (so it's a pretty physical job).

Also, I would like to lose fat faster if possible, but I don't know how far I can go without losing muscle ?

I read on another thread that since i'm new to weight lifting, obese (31.2% bf) and an endomorph, I shouldn't be concerned about losing muscle while losing weight cause it probably won't happen, but i'd like to be sure ?

thanks a lot !

Domicron
06-17-2013, 10:59 AM
disregard endomorph, first. glad to see the numbers.

if you're seeing results by using the numbers keep going until you don't. 2000 cals seems low, but you said you're obese, so maybe that's good for you. i would try not to worry about speed. slow progress is lasting progress

KayPS
06-17-2013, 11:00 AM
First, congratulations on making the decision to get healthy, and your initial weight loss.

Second, please don't use endo/ecto/mesomorph to describe yourself. They don't exist, and are excuses.

Now, onto your questions. Where did you get your numbers? Calories? What is your TDEE?

Re: your macros -

Set protein to .82g/lb
Set fat to .4g/lb
These are minimums.
Compose remaining calories of whatever spread of p/f/c you prefer.

Please read this (http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=121703981) sticky, if you haven't already.

SelfMotivated
06-17-2013, 11:15 AM
First, congratulations on making the decision to get healthy, and your initial weight loss.

Second, please don't use endo/ecto/mesomorph to describe yourself. They don't exist, and are excuses.

Now, onto your questions. Where did you get your numbers? Calories? What is your TDEE?

Re: your macros -

Set protein to .82g/lb
Set fat to .4g/lb
These are minimums.
Compose remaining calories of whatever spread of p/f/c you prefer.

Please read this (http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=121703981) sticky, if you haven't already.

The TDEE calculation information in Emma's sticky is not particularly accurate for the obese. Additionally, the obese can often successfully use more aggressive dieting techniques than the general population, especially when under the direction and care of a physician.

Also quote from here (Post #16 by WonderPug): http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=134584631&highlight=obese+macros

** If obese, use LBM to calculate fat intake and, if on a cut, you can lower dietary fat intake to as little as 0.35 grams per pound of bodyweight (or LBM, if obese) in the event you do not have the caloric budget for higher fat intake.

feelix
06-17-2013, 11:17 AM
disregard endomorph, first. glad to see the numbers.

if you're seeing results by using the numbers keep going until you don't. 2000 cals seems low, but you said you're obese, so maybe that's good for you. i would try not to worry about speed. slow progress is lasting progress

thanks ! and yeah, that last part is hopefully true :P !




First, congratulations on making the decision to get healthy, and your initial weight loss.

Second, please don't use endo/ecto/mesomorph to describe yourself. They don't exist, and are excuses.

Now, onto your questions. Where did you get your numbers? Calories? What is your TDEE?

Re: your macros -

Set protein to .82g/lb
Set fat to .4g/lb
These are minimums.
Compose remaining calories of whatever spread of p/f/c you prefer.

Please read

thanks ! I actually used this sticky to calculate my values. However, that's one of my question.

Here is my TEE based on two different activity factors (Moderately Active and Very Active) and the values when I substract 10% and 20% to it :

1.5 = 2790 cal - (10% = 2512 cal) (20% = 2232 cal)
1.6 = 2976 cal - (10% = 2679 cal) (20% = 2381 cal)
1.7 = 3162 cal - (10% = 2846 cal) (20% = 2530 cal)
1.8 = 3348 cal - (10% = 3014 cal) (20% = 2679 cal)

Like I said, I work on average 45 hours/week as a waiter (so i'm almost always standing up and walking around). I walk to my job and to the gym everyday, so that's about 10 hours of walking per week at a moderate pace and I will start training 6 days/week for about 1.25 hour/day. So I don't know which values I should use, moderately active or very active ?

thanks !

feelix
06-17-2013, 11:27 AM
Second, please don't use endo/ecto/mesomorph to describe yourself. They don't exist, and are excuses.

Really :S ? I know that they are not "accurate" and 100% true but I always thought that there was a bit of truth in them ?

Otherwise, how would you explain that my friend weight 115 pounds @ 2-3% bf and is unable to gain weight/fat whilst I weigh 221 pounds @ 31.2% bf and struggle to lose weight and gain fat really easily even though we both eat about the same ...? :S (not trying to be a d*ck, I just want to understand why somatotypes aren't seen as true nowadays)

Domicron
06-17-2013, 11:29 AM
how would you explain that my friend weight 115 pounds @ 2-3% bf and is unable to gain weight/fat whilst I weigh 221 pounds @ 31.2% and struggle to lose weight and gain fat really easily even though we both eat about the same

he is burning more calories than he eats. and you are burning fewer calories than you think.

track the food you eat, and ask him to do the same. compare activity levels. you will find that he uses his calories while you stockpile them.

also 2-3% body fat is death-level, usually (i understand competitions and whatever)

KayPS
06-17-2013, 11:29 AM
The TDEE calculation information in Emma's sticky is not particularly accurate for the obese. Additionally, the obese can often successfully use more aggressive dieting techniques than the general population, especially when under the direction and care of a physician.

Also quote from here (Post #16 by WonderPug): http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=134584631&highlight=obese+macros

I agree. It's easy to lose sight of the potential inaccuracies in those formulas for obese individuals. But it's always helpful to have a starting point.

And I would be hard-pressed to disagree with Pug, and this post is no exception. However it should be noted that the recommended fats are still minimums, and should not be used as limits, so long as the individual is staying within calorie goals.


thanks ! and yeah, that last part is hopefully true :P !





thanks ! I actually used this sticky to calculate my values. However, that's one of my question.

Here is my TEE based on two different activity factors (Moderately Active and Very Active) and the values when I substract 10% and 20% to it :

1.5 = 2790 cal - (10% = 2512 cal) (20% = 2232 cal)
1.6 = 2976 cal - (10% = 2679 cal) (20% = 2381 cal)
1.7 = 3162 cal - (10% = 2846 cal) (20% = 2530 cal)
1.8 = 3348 cal - (10% = 3014 cal) (20% = 2679 cal)

Like I said, I work on average 45 hours/week as a waiter (so i'm almost always standing up and walking around). I walk to my job and to the gym everyday, so that's about 10 hours of walking per week at a moderate pace and I will start training 6 days/week for about 1.25 hour/day. So I don't know which values I should use, moderately active or very active ?

thanks !

I personally would start with 1.7, try it for a few weeks, reevaluate, and adjust as needed. Because of your weight, your initial nutrition plan is going to be trial and error. You really need to monitor your weight loss, and adjust based on your results.

Domicron
06-17-2013, 11:31 AM
also: restaurant worker here so i know the life. do you drink soda? restaurant employees can put away a ton of soda in a day and that's tons of extra calories.

KayPS
06-17-2013, 11:32 AM
he is burning more calories than he eats. and you are burning fewer calories than you think.

track the food you eat, and ask him to do the same. compare activity levels. you will find that he uses his calories while you stockpile them.

also 2-3% body fat is death-level, usually (i understand competitions and whatever)

Pretty much this.

He's struggling to gain weight because he's not in a calorie surplus.

You're struggling to lose weight because you're not in a calorie deficit.

It really is that simple. Weight gain/loss is simply a matter of energy balance.

feelix
07-07-2013, 11:03 PM
I agree. It's easy to lose sight of the potential inaccuracies in those formulas for obese individuals. But it's always helpful to have a starting point.

And I would be hard-pressed to disagree with Pug, and this post is no exception. However it should be noted that the recommended fats are still minimums, and should not be used as limits, so long as the individual is staying within calorie goals.



I personally would start with 1.7, try it for a few weeks, reevaluate, and adjust as needed. Because of your weight, your initial nutrition plan is going to be trial and error. You really need to monitor your weight loss, and adjust based on your results.

I tried for the last three weeks with 2000 calories. It's almost the same every day. I eat very well and clean during the day and almost every night (I do the close at my job), at around 01:00AM I get a HUGE carb craving and eat junk before going to bed at around 3:00AM...

So, I have a few hypotheses :

1. I'm not eating enough calories (maybe I should aim for 2500 ???)
2. I'm not eating enough carbs during the day
3. At the end of my shift, I get tired and my body want carbs...

I tried a few things. I tried taking a casein + grinded oats shake at around midnight, and it works sometimes (but not always...). I have also tried to take a few servings of ON Amin0 Energy during my shift (it contains caffeine, so it gives me an energy boost and I don't get hungry). However, when I take too much caffeine, I end up getting really anxious and irritable, so it's definitely not a good long-term option for me...

Any ideas ?

It's kind of sad because I really make HUGE efforts during the day. I at 100% CLEAN and give everything that I have in the gym, but I end up blowing everything up with these huge cravings right before going to bed...

thanks a lot !