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djb12
04-13-2013, 01:07 PM
i recently got some advice from a pro bodybulider who works for one of the major supplement companys about my diet etc i sent him my stats
6ft 2inch
28 years old
12stone5(175pounds)
electrician by day so active but not heavy work
train intensely 6 nights a week mon to sat 3 nights lifting 3 nights boxing
want to get to 7 to 9 % bodyfat and im currently roughly 15 to 18%(skinny fat)

he told me i need to be eating 2100-2200 calories a day to cut
1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight....which works out roughly 260 grams
130 grams of carbs and again roughly 60 gram of fat which worked out a ratio split of 50/25/25 i know the splits dont mean alot im just letting you guys know...
the foods i eat all week except one cheat meal on a sat night are
protein
whey protein
chicken
salmon
tuna

carbs
oatmeal
sweet pototoe
brown rice
oatcakes

fats
natural peanut butter
advocados

also
organic natural yogurt,berrys


iv been doing this for 3 weeks and it seems to be working ok iv never had a ripped body and i decided i wanted to once and for all and so far so good but iv still got a long way to go, im just curious what people on here thought i know what most people say is 1 gram of protein per bodyweight is enough but this guy insisted 1.5 is the way he has always done it and he showed me pics of people who he had helped and they had really ended up with good physiques.

thanks in advance for anyone who leaves there opinions and critiques of this diet.

SuffolkPunch
04-13-2013, 01:15 PM
The food choices are up to you, it's the calories and macros that actually matter. The cals/macros mentioned seem OK - protein is a lot higher than it needs to be though. Won't cause any harm but won't do anything extra either.

Read the macro calculation sticky thread.

WonderPug
04-13-2013, 01:19 PM
Set protein intake to 140 grams per day and dietary fat to 80 grams. Compose your remaining calories from whatever mix of carbs and additional protein and fat you prefer.

snorkelman
04-13-2013, 01:20 PM
There will be others that comment about your food limitations, but I just wanted to advise you that since tuna is one of your key protein sources, you should be aware that it is wise to limit your intake of canned light tuna to 12 ounces (340 grams) per week from a mercury standpoint, but canned WHITE tuna should be limited to 6 ounces (170 grams) per week.

BrentEvo
04-13-2013, 02:13 PM
Currently I have a VERY high protein intake. Why settle for what will 'probably' be all your body will utilize? I want to make damn sure with as much work I put in that I give my body WAY TOO MUCH protein. if you can handle 1.6 and you only give your body 1.5 then...


See where I'm going? Protein is VERY SATIATING though. Tough to eat 300 g a day (that's me, not for everyone.) I'm at 170 and 9% body fat. Train 6-9 days straight. Sometimes twice a day. The extra protein WILL NOT HURT YOU!!! So if it won't hurt you, then what's the problem? Fats are on point it sounds like too for you.

SideSteal
04-13-2013, 04:57 PM
Currently I have a VERY high protein intake. Why settle for what will 'probably' be all your body will utilize? I want to make damn sure with as much work I put in that I give my body WAY TOO MUCH protein. if you can handle 1.6 and you only give your body 1.5 then...


See where I'm going? Protein is VERY SATIATING though. Tough to eat 300 g a day (that's me, not for everyone.) I'm at 170 and 9% body fat. Train 6-9 days straight. Sometimes twice a day. The extra protein WILL NOT HURT YOU!!! So if it won't hurt you, then what's the problem? Fats are on point it sounds like too for you.

The potential problem is that the other macronutrients may have a greater effect on performance.

Dairiel
04-13-2013, 06:50 PM
Two other potential problems are that 2, protein is the most expensive nutrient. This means that while it may not be harmful or beneficial to take in extra protein, it will be a drain on your wallet.

The third is that too much protein has been known to cause kidney problems. I'm not saying anyone here is in that range, but as far as I know, that is pretty well established and worth googling.

StackingPlates
04-13-2013, 08:53 PM
The third is that too much protein has been known to cause kidney problems.

Tempted to neg for stating this as if it were factual...

KobiDC
04-13-2013, 08:56 PM
The third is that too much protein has been known to cause kidney problems. I'm not saying anyone here is in that range, but as far as I know, that is pretty well established and worth googling.

http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/food_myths/High_Protein_is_Harmful.php

LiftCore
04-13-2013, 09:02 PM
The third is that too much protein has been known to cause kidney problems. I'm not saying anyone here is in that range, but as far as I know, that is pretty well established and worth googling.

Are you implying that you could simply find the correct answer for a question by simply googling it? I don't think so.

And for protein to have adverse effects on your kidneys, to say the least, you would have to be making it a personal goal to somehow damage your kidneys through excess protein consumption.

StackingPlates
04-13-2013, 09:08 PM
The third is that too much protein has been known to cause kidney problems......that is pretty well established and worth googling.

Weird, my "googling" came up with these. Can you please enlighten us since everything contradicts your factual claim?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10722779
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17383270
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23219108

Here's a neat one, although it only measured a single individual: http://sncsalvador.com.br/artigos/Crea-nao-prejudica-funcao-renal-em-homem-sem-1-rim.pdf

Cliff notes: single kidney + high protein diet + creatine usage = no kidney problems