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desslok
04-12-2013, 08:45 AM
I am going to do some expirimentation with my diet and meal timing, so it is critical that I know exactly when my insulin spike peaks. Anybody have recommendations on a good watch/armband etc that can alert me at that moment? I am guessing one of those diabetic watches? But not sure. Thanks!

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 08:48 AM
I don't know if it's gonna alert you when the insulin will spike, but I know it's a fantastic glucometer: DexCom Seven Plus (dexcom.com)

Tim Ferriss used it during his experimentations for the 4-Hour Body, it's an always connected glucometer which will give you a live graphic of your glucose levels.

Edit: The Dexcom G4 platinum looks more of a good choice! It's wireless. There's that sensor that is plugged on you, and you can keep the monitor in your pocket or within 20 feet of you.

Terrimonas
04-12-2013, 09:28 AM
I don't know if it's gonna alert you when the insulin will spike, but I know it's a fantastic glucometer: DexCom Seven Plus (dexcom.com)

Tim Ferriss used it during his experimentations for the 4-Hour Body, it's an always connected glucometer which will give you a live graphic of your glucose levels.

Edit: The Dexcom G4 platinum looks more of a good choice! It's wireless. There's that sensor that is plugged on you, and you can keep the monitor in your pocket or within 20 feet of you.

But when he takes his brotein shake, which spikes insulin but doesn't impact blood sugar much, how will he know when to take his createen so the insulin pushes it into his mussles?

vismal
04-12-2013, 09:41 AM
But when he takes his brotein shake, which spikes insulin but doesn't impact blood sugar much, how will he know when to take his createen so the insulin pushes it into his mussles?^^^This^^^ He'll just lose all his gainzzzz Would rep, on spread

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 10:07 AM
But when he takes his brotein shake, which spikes insulin but doesn't impact blood sugar much, how will he know when to take his createen so the insulin pushes it into his mussles?

Good question. I really don't know. But I assume that the reason why the brotein shake would spike insulin is if the shake contains a bit of carbs, and even if it doesn't, the human body will use broteins to make some glucose...

That's an hypothesis though. But one sure thing is, as soon as the blood glucose is higher, insulin is released so you can probably assume that when glucose levels are higher, insulin levels will be higher in a couple minutes after that.

Take brotein shake, wait for the glucose level to go up, once it is, take creatin. Prolly the best tho I'm not sure.

Mdenatale
04-12-2013, 10:30 AM
Good question. I really don't know. But I assume that the reason why the brotein shake would spike insulin is if the shake contains a bit of carbs, and even if it doesn't, the human body will use broteins to make some glucose...

That's an hypothesis though. But one sure thing is, as soon as the blood glucose is higher, insulin is released so you can probably assume that when glucose levels are higher, insulin levels will be higher in a couple minutes after that.

Take brotein shake, wait for the glucose level to go up, once it is, take creatin. Prolly the best tho I'm not sure.

I think you missed the sarcasm in that post. Anyway...


I don't know of any device to monitor insulin level. Such a device probably exists, but it is not likely to be found outside of a medical setting. There are plenty of blood glucose monitors, but unless you are diabetic I would think your blood sugar level will remain rather constant as you body automatically regulates it.

desslok
04-12-2013, 10:36 AM
I don't know if it's gonna alert you when the insulin will spike, but I know it's a fantastic glucometer: DexCom Seven Plus (dexcom.com)

Tim Ferriss used it during his experimentations for the 4-Hour Body, it's an always connected glucometer which will give you a live graphic of your glucose levels.

Edit: The Dexcom G4 platinum looks more of a good choice! It's wireless. There's that sensor that is plugged on you, and you can keep the monitor in your pocket or within 20 feet of you.

Thanks repped!

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 06:19 PM
I think you missed the sarcasm in that post. Anyway...


I don't know of any device to monitor insulin level. Such a device probably exists, but it is not likely to be found outside of a medical setting. There are plenty of blood glucose monitors, but unless you are diabetic I would think your blood sugar level will remain rather constant as you body automatically regulates it.

I just spoke to a doctor, and first of all, proteins won't have in impact on insulin, only carbs will. And no, blood sugar level isn't constant at all because there's variation in blood glucose levels BEFORE insulin is released.

The best way to make sure that the nutriments go in the muscles is to have something with the right balance of carbs and proteins (such as a good protein shake). A shake that only contains proteins is good because it doesn't contain much calories, though a shake with some carbs added is better (even though it has more calories) because carbs make your body release some insulin, which will help both carbs AND proteins get into the muscles.

Insulin secretion will depend on the glycemic index and glycemic load of the carbs you eat. Food with low glycemic index such as quinoa or black beans will have a very little impact on insulin secretion. But if you drink beer, which contains the kind of sugar that has the highest glycemic index of all carbs (maltose, with a GI of about 120), your body will have to release a lot of insulin since the high-GI carbs are absorbed really quickly by the body.

And yeah, I missed the sarcasm in the last post! My bad :P

KobiDC
04-12-2013, 06:34 PM
OP report back with results once you time your insulin, you gonna be huuuuuuuuuuge! Remember to have your casein protein before bed to stop catabolism when you're sleeping, and as always, don't eat carbs after 6PM... you don't want your insulin spiking, otherwise all your gainzzz are gonna turn into fat brah.

chameleonism
04-12-2013, 06:44 PM
I just spoke to a doctor, and first of all, proteins won't have in impact on insulin, only carbs will. And no, blood sugar level isn't constant at all because there's variation in blood glucose levels BEFORE insulin is released.

The only thing that could have made this statement better was if you said you stayed at a holiday inn express instead of saying you just spoke to a doctor. And of course, you are wrong.

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 06:50 PM
Instead of answering something like that, you could actually help and tell me why I'm wrong. And give us the right sentence.

Maybe I should have said: proteins have a VERY SMALL effect on insulin release, because the human body can transform proteins in glucose, which will itself release some insulin.

Protein by itself DOES have a VERY SMALL impact on insulin release.

KobiDC
04-12-2013, 06:58 PM
Instead of answering something like that, you could actually help and tell me why I'm wrong. And give us the right sentence.

Maybe I should have said: proteins have a VERY SMALL effect on insulin release, because the human body can transform proteins in glucose, which will itself release some insulin.

Protein by itself DOES have a VERY SMALL impact on insulin release.

Protein is just as insulinogenic as carbohydrates..

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 07:06 PM
But foods with high Glycemic index are much more insulogenic, right?

KobiDC
04-12-2013, 07:08 PM
But foods with high Glycemic index are much more insulogenic, right?

GI is irrelevant for near anyone who is not diabetic. Protein is just, if not more, insulinogenic than ingested carbohydrates.

Read this -> http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/?page_id=319

GTdoeslife
04-12-2013, 07:11 PM
GI is relevant because the lower the GI, the longer the food will keep you full! High GI foods such as white bread or minute rice are absorbed very rapidly...

KobiDC
04-12-2013, 07:16 PM
GI is relevant because the lower the GI, the longer the food will keep you full! High GI foods such as white bread or minute rice are absorbed very rapidly...

In regards to body composition, it's rather irrelevant. The fluctuations of endogenous insulin aren't enough to significantly influence a healthy individual's body composition (unless you're doing something really stupid, eg. having all of your calories from whey) - rendering it rather meaningless.

And not quite - pumpkin is quite high GI, but I personally find it very satiating. Hummus is low GI, but I don't find it very satiating (when paired with anything).

Terrimonas
04-13-2013, 02:10 AM
This thread went from sweet potato to full retard

GTdoeslife
04-13-2013, 01:33 PM
I find it more interesting than retarded, but thanks for the input.