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View Full Version : Sci. finds relaxing the mind wipes out useless data and preps it for future learning



Tamorlane
03-20-2013, 10:25 AM
When the mind is at rest, the electrical signals by which brain cells communicate appear to travel in reverse, wiping out unimportant information in the process, but sensitizing the cells for future sensory learning, according to a study of rats conducted by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

The finding has implications not only for studies seeking to help people learn more efficiently, but also for attempts to understand and treat post-traumatic stress disorder―in which the mind has difficulty moving beyond a disturbing experience.

The reverse firing, depicted in this diagram, happens during sleep and at rest, appearing to reset the cell and priming it to learn new information.
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/PublishingImages/031413-neuron.gif


This pattern appears to underlie the formation of new memories. A connection that is reset but never stimulated again may simply fade from use over time, Dr. Bukalo explained. But when a cell is stimulated again, it fires a stronger signal and may be more easily synchronized to the reinforced signals of other brain cells, all of which act in concert over time.

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/Pages/031813-backwards-neurons.aspx

TH3SHR3DD3R
03-20-2013, 11:23 AM
Prudent information, especially in today's world where it can be so hard to shut down and recharge.

Spartacus777
03-20-2013, 11:55 AM
Prudent information, especially in today's world where it can be so hard to shut down and recharge.

Can also help explain why meditation is so useful, it's taking that "at rest" state to the extreme, priming your brain to perform measurably better physiologically.

TH3SHR3DD3R
03-20-2013, 12:08 PM
Can also help explain why meditation is so useful, it's taking that "at rest" state to the extreme, priming your brain to perform measurably better physiologically.

On dat relevant time:


Past research suggests that meditation doesn't have to be intensive to have an effect. One recent study by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte found that students were able to improve their performance on tests of cognitive skill after just four days of meditation training for only 20 minutes per day. On one particularly challenging computer test of sustained attention, students who meditated did 10 times better than a control group. They also did significantly better on timed information-processing tasks that were designed to induce deadline stress.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2008914,00.html#ixzz2O6moCYeJ

Meditation improves the individual, which improves the collective, which improves the individual.

SigmundFreud
03-20-2013, 12:09 PM
Can also help explain why meditation is so useful, it's taking that "at rest" state to the extreme, priming your brain to perform measurably better physiologically.

This was my first thought. I study much better if I meditate (relax) a couple minutes before studying.

Spartacus777
03-20-2013, 12:18 PM
This was my first thought. I study much better if I meditate (relax) a couple minutes before studying.

How do you go about it? I'm trying to see for certain if these binueral beats have any real positive effect whatsoever of if it's just placebo if anything.

Spuddy
03-20-2013, 11:22 PM
How do you go about it? I'm trying to see for certain if these binueral beats have any real positive effect whatsoever of if it's just placebo if anything.
Sounds are a great way for some people to meditate more deeply, while other people don't feel a thing, it really depends on the person. The best meditation is exactly what works for you, but to give it a start, just sit comfortably (I use a recliner) and clear your mind of any active thought trains. Pictures and thoughts will pop up, but don't engage them; simply observe them and let them go again. Be the silent observer of your own head. You might last 5 minutes, you might last 30.. It doesn't matter too much, just do what feels right and you can't go wrong



-edit- strong avi, I'm second-guessing what you may have meant by that question..