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smz08
03-08-2013, 09:33 AM
Hey everyone -
I have both hypothyroidism and PCOS, which has made it a struggle for me to maintain my weight and especially to lose. Last year, I was addicted to exercise so I wouldn't gain weight - I was doing sprints in the morning, doing weights in the mid afternoon, then teaching Spinning or running again at night (around 8 miles or so). I was about 143 at that time and around 19-21% BF. I would freak out if I missed a workout, or if I had one meal that wasn't 100% clean or in my plan (which was just meats, fruits, veggies, and nuts - nothing processed). My life was all about fitness and diet (which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but I'm a full time student with a job and a million other things I should be concentrating on).

So I pulled it back this year so that I could find a healthy balance and get all of my friends and family off of my back. But now, with working out once a day (doing both strength and cardio), and sometimes twice on the two days that I teach Spin, I'm up to 160, and I don't even know what BF% currently... last time I checked about a month ago I was 25% or 26%. I still kept my diet in check, eating clean as much as I can, giving myself a little leeway not he rare occasion that I go out to eat (and I'm a poor college student, so trust me - it's rare). I'm pretty good about getting adequate sleep - I'm usually in bed before 11, and get up around 6am each day, so I don't think that's an issue.

I was just looking for any tips/advice/things that you've seen or done that have worked for you or people you know - workout wise, nutrition wise, whatever. I'm about to graduate with a dietetics degree in hopes of pursuing a career as an RD. I don't want to be the chubby RD giving people nutrition advice, hah. And with working so hard to plan and do everything, and fit that all in with school and work would be great. That's really all I want - without becoming completely fixated on it.

aliensarecool
03-10-2013, 02:35 PM
Bump

foodandfitness
03-10-2013, 02:59 PM
Hey, OP. RD here. My first question- is your hypothyroidism controlled with medication? Because if you're not producing or medicating with the appropriate amount of thyroxine, you're not going to be able to do much about your weight until you do. For example, I was just working with a client (185 lb male, 23yo, 5'8") who was not losing weight on 1400 calories. I told him to get his thyroid checked and that was it. He's dropping weight steadily now on more calories.

A lot of people get into the RD profession because they have struggled with nutrition at some point in their life and they want to help other people too. This doesn't just go away once you get the RD behind your name. There's nothing wrong with being a RD and not having a 6 pack.

With the hypothyroid issue aside, your other issue is a psychological one with food. You need to learn how to indulge with self control and without guilt while still progressing to your goals. Labeling foods as "clean" will not help you achieve this, nor is it a direct path to your weight loss goals. Fat loss is all about energy balance. Track your calories using a program such as myfitnesspal.com and stay consistent. Eat adequate protein and lift weights to ensure you're losing the highest % of fat and preserving muscle. The stickies in the nutrition session is a good place to start. The PCOS will affect your appetite, but if you count your calories, at least you'll be able to see what your intake is on a day to day basis.

That being said, don't cut calories too hard. Use the info in the stickies to get a starting point. Most of my female clients want to start out with an 800 calorie diet to strip the fat. You have to ask yourself "can I eat like this every day and forever?" if the answer is "no" then your weight loss will only be temporary at best.

Also, if you have obsessive tendencies, you may become obsessed over tracking your food and calories. I realize this, but tracking and planning ahead are the most direct routes to your goals. Therefore, I would recommend that you would do well to self monitor these tendencies and seek the help of a professional counselor if you find yourself developing too much anxiety over eating.

Good luck.

Porifaural
03-10-2013, 06:19 PM
Try reading some of the material at 180degreehealth blog (google it). Your addiction to exercise and micro-managing your diet and nutrition, while well-intentioned, was probably actually very stressful on your body. Stress is damaging to your thyroid, and if you want to repair your thyroid, I would suggest relaxing a little bit more on the restrictiveness of your diet and exercise regimen. One of the human body's evolved responses to stress is weight gain, so this weight gain is a rebound effect caused by the stress of your previous regimen.

rand18m
03-10-2013, 06:44 PM
Hey, OP. RD here. My first question- is your hypothyroidism controlled with medication? Because if you're not producing or medicating with the appropriate amount of thyroxine, you're not going to be able to do much about your weight until you do. For example, I was just working with a client (185 lb male, 23yo, 5'8") who was not losing weight on 1400 calories. I told him to get his thyroid checked and that was it. He's dropping weight steadily now on more calories.

A lot of people get into the RD profession because they have struggled with nutrition at some point in their life and they want to help other people too. This doesn't just go away once you get the RD behind your name. There's nothing wrong with being a RD and not having a 6 pack.

With the hypothyroid issue aside, your other issue is a psychological one with food. You need to learn how to indulge with self control and without guilt while still progressing to your goals. Labeling foods as "clean" will not help you achieve this, nor is it a direct path to your weight loss goals. Fat loss is all about energy balance. Track your calories using a program such as myfitnesspal.com and stay consistent. Eat adequate protein and lift weights to ensure you're losing the highest % of fat and preserving muscle. The stickies in the nutrition session is a good place to start. The PCOS will affect your appetite, but if you count your calories, at least you'll be able to see what your intake is on a day to day basis.

That being said, don't cut calories too hard. Use the info in the stickies to get a starting point. Most of my female clients want to start out with an 800 calorie diet to strip the fat. You have to ask yourself "can I eat like this every day and forever?" if the answer is "no" then your weight loss will only be temporary at best.

Also, if you have obsessive tendencies, you may become obsessed over tracking your food and calories. I realize this, but tracking and planning ahead are the most direct routes to your goals. Therefore, I would recommend that you would do well to self monitor these tendencies and seek the help of a professional counselor if you find yourself developing too much anxiety over eating.

Good luck.

This ^^ is all reasonable! However, based on your limited description of your problem I also want you to consider the ramifications of the female athlete triad. Although of the three predominate issues involved, considering your activity level and eating habits it's possible there is a connection. If not familiar with the syndrome please use google to it's fullest. If not I suggest you listen to the advice above and if needed seek assistance from medical professionals. Nothing wrong with that!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_Athlete_Triad_Syndrome

Torance
03-10-2013, 07:55 PM
1.Track calories
2. Reverse diet till your thyroid gets back to check
3. Get bloodwork done every 6months to get dosage corrected

I have been at it for a long time and no matter whether I train 6hrs a week or 21hrs a week I still cant manage to get down to 10% bf, it is nontheless improving and Im getting closer every year with the correct dosage and tracking calories.