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View Full Version : I need help making a diet.



Amine999
02-09-2013, 12:23 AM
So I started working out seriously last Friday, February 1st and I've been going to the gym every day this week except last Saturday and Sunday (I didn't have a routine, the work-out I did Friday was just to get started/warm-up so I did my friend's workout for that day along with him).

We now work-out together and I have my own routine that one of my good friends made for me (he's about to become a physical trainer soon), he's made extraordinary progress in the last year and he just motivated me even more to work out seriously, I used to always do Cardio and light weight exercises because I was just stubborn and thought I could lose weight that way, I was obviously way in over my head and regret it to this day.

Anyways, all of that is in the past now, I'm working out seriously everyday, giving my 100% and hoping for a better life with good progress and improvement.

So I need help making a good diet, I want to eat the same thing everyday because changing meal plans by day is harder and I don't mind sticking to the same thing.

A few more details:
Calories needed to maintain my current weight: 3374
Calories needed to lose weight: 2624 - 2874 (calorie deficit)

According to the Macronutrients Calculator on Bodybuilding, I need about 2676 - 3122 calories per day and:
223g protein
78g fats
350g carbs

Which is 30 - 23 - 47 ratio.

I've been eating around 1800 - 2200 calories per day as of now but I need a solid diet.

What would you recommend for the best carb, fats and protein sources? I can't eat 7+ meals a day and meat's very expensive. I was thinking of getting protein powder as it helps in muscle recovery, it's very efficient after work-outs and most of my friends who are in best shape all take protein shakes/powders. Might as well get protein concentrate if most of what I want out of meat is the protein.

I really need help to make a diet, and I just need guidance... I really want to achieve what I set on my bodyspace, I want this summer to be my biggest landmark.

AJL1
02-09-2013, 12:36 AM
Macros look good. You probably don't NEED that much protein, however if your daily minimums are hit (ie. 1g/lb protein, 0.4g/lb fat) then go for it! As far as the best carb/fat/protein sources go, you have a lot of options. There is no such thing as 'good foods' and 'bad foods' so please don't get in that kind of mindset, but off the top of my head some popular food choices include (but are certainly not limited to);

Protein: Meat, eggs, whey shakes, cottage cheese (my personal favourite), other dairy products.
Carbs: Rice, oats, fruit. There is really an endless list of carb sources.
Fats: Eggs, almosts + other nuts, peanut butter, olive/sesame/coconut oil.

Whey protein is good if it is cheap and conveient, but I would suggest that the reason your powder-using friends are in good shape is because they train hard and count their macros. Another point is that even though you are happy to eat the same thing each day, you can also make up 2 meals plans and alternate between them if you get bored.

Good luck!


Edit: Avocado is another awesome source of fat! Amazing stuff.

Amine999
02-09-2013, 01:22 AM
Macros look good. You probably don't NEED that much protein, however if your daily minimums are hit (ie. 1g/lb protein, 0.4g/lb fat) then go for it! As far as the best carb/fat/protein sources go, you have a lot of options. There is no such thing as 'good foods' and 'bad foods' so please don't get in that kind of mindset, but off the top of my head some popular food choices include (but are certainly not limited to);

Protein: Meat, eggs, whey shakes, cottage cheese (my personal favourite), other dairy products.
Carbs: Rice, oats, fruit. There is really an endless list of carb sources.
Fats: Eggs, almosts + other nuts, peanut butter, olive/sesame/coconut oil.

Whey protein is good if it is cheap and conveient, but I would suggest that the reason your powder-using friends are in good shape is because they train hard and count their macros. Another point is that even though you are happy to eat the same thing each day, you can also make up 2 meals plans and alternate between them if you get bored.

Good luck!


Edit: Avocado is another awesome source of fat! Amazing stuff.

That's the thing I don't really know my exact amount of fat in weight, my bodyspace estimated it was 30% according to my description/options I chose. Is there another way of knowing? Perhaps with full body weight?

Also, do you recommend any sites for complete accurate lists for nutrition values? Like an ultimate "go to" source for all your numbers needs?

Also, I don't want to get cheap protein, I'm sure that "you get what you paid for" is a good motto when it comes to this. What are good whey proteins? I don't know much about them so I'm guessing I need to learn everything I can tonight about them. Again if you have a good source for me to learn all I need to know before buying whey protein, please share :)

(Tell me what you think of this: kaizenprotein[DOT]com/index.html )

And yeah, I know they're in good shape cause they train hard, but they all noticed the improvement protein powders granted them, like, before and after difference of using it. I'm willing to put all the effort I need, I just want a reset in life, and I want all the tools I need to make it a reality.

I'll probably try 2 meal plans and just make them similar with a few changes if need be.

AJL1
02-09-2013, 02:08 AM
The MyFitnessPal website has an enormous database of foods. You just search it, put in your serving size and voila, it spits out the calories and macros for you. That will help you out a lot.

As far as the 'you get what you pay for' thing goes, you might be surprised. A lot of the cost of protein supplements come from the brand name; you can buy pretty generic packaged protein online (we have a brand in Australia called *******rients, I'm sure there are similar ones in Canada) which are just as good as any large supplement company with fancy packaging.

I have heard good things about Optimum Nutrition '100% whey', which is supposedly pretty good quality and cheap. I'm sure some other forum members can give some advice on good brands, but PLEASE don't get sucked into thinking that just because one protein is more expensive than the other it is better. It is generally not the case.


Edit: For some reason the filter blocked the name of the company. But it's irrelevant, the point is that I'm sure there are similar in North America.

Amine999
02-09-2013, 02:21 AM
The MyFitnessPal website has an enormous database of foods. You just search it, put in your serving size and voila, it spits out the calories and macros for you. That will help you out a lot.

As far as the 'you get what you pay for' thing goes, you might be surprised. A lot of the cost of protein supplements come from the brand name; you can buy pretty generic packaged protein online (we have a brand in Australia called *******rients, I'm sure there are similar ones in Canada) which are just as good as any large supplement company with fancy packaging.

I have heard good things about Optimum Nutrition '100% whey', which is supposedly pretty good quality and cheap. I'm sure some other forum members can give some advice on good brands, but PLEASE don't get sucked into thinking that just because one protein is more expensive than the other it is better. It is generally not the case.


Edit: For some reason the filter blocked the name of the company. But it's irrelevant, the point is that I'm sure there are similar in North America.

Wow thanks a bunch, I'm so glad I made this thread now, I was beginning to lose hope in it lol.

And yeah, I've been noticing that more expensive isn't generally better, but I've been proven right a lot which is why I adopted the idea completely, but I always make exceptions and get as much opinions as I can. Most of my friends use the one in the link I sent you, which is why I wanted to get an opinion from an unbiased party.

Again, thanks a lot for the help, have some rep :)