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View Full Version : Healthy tuna dilemma - need help from chefs!



klift808
02-04-2013, 06:08 AM
For years now, I always had this goal in my mind with regards to tuna. My ultimate goal is to make FRESH tuna (tuna steak), taste like a canned tuna.

We all know that tuna steaks are tasteless when eaten grilled without spices, sorry to those who love to eat tuna steaks. Canned tuna on the other hand taste good even if its just tuna in water. Now question is, how do they do this? What is the secret recipe to achieve such taste using fresh tuna?

The reason why this is on my bucket list is because I always believed that canned tuna (or canned goods in general) aren't good for your health. I have heard from others that the long term effects of eating canned goods often could lead to sickness like cancer etc. With or without scientific backup for this claim, I still think it is not healthy to eat canned goods often.

I tried grinding tuna steaks first and then cooking them but they clump up in the end and become one whole block. Canned ones on the other hand are always filleted and they will never clump up even if you cook them.

Is there anyone out there who has the answer on how to achieve this goal? Chefs? How do you do this?

Thank you.

WonderPug
02-04-2013, 06:10 AM
FYI: Consuming tuna is anything but very small amounts per week poses health risks.

klift808
02-04-2013, 06:54 AM
FYI: Consuming tuna is anything but very small amounts per week poses health risks.

Thank you for the info, but i just want to play safe (genes arent that good, plenty of sicknesses). I think theres a way to make tuna steaks taste like canned tuna. :)

ironwill2008
02-04-2013, 07:01 AM
Chefs? How do you do this?


Chefs don't do this.


You trollin, brah?

GibRed
02-04-2013, 07:09 AM
Its made like this:

The tuna are frozen while aboard the fishing vessel. Once the boat reaches the dock, the fish are thawed and cleaned.

The fish are pre-cooked or steamed in large wire baskets and allowed to cool. Next each fish is cleaned. The tender loins are cut into fillets and then conveyed to the "chopper" used to prepare chunk-style tuna.

Depending on the style, precise amounts of fine grain salt, vegetable broth and water or pure vegetable oil may be added. The filled cans are then vacuum-sealed and cooked (retorted) again.

klift808
02-04-2013, 06:20 PM
Its made like this:

The tuna are frozen while aboard the fishing vessel. Once the boat reaches the dock, the fish are thawed and cleaned.

The fish are pre-cooked or steamed in large wire baskets and allowed to cool. Next each fish is cleaned. The tender loins are cut into fillets and then conveyed to the "chopper" used to prepare chunk-style tuna.

Depending on the style, precise amounts of fine grain salt, vegetable broth and water or pure vegetable oil may be added. The filled cans are then vacuum-sealed and cooked (retorted) again.

So thats the process. Wondering if I can do something similar to that at home lol

klift808
02-04-2013, 06:20 PM
Chefs don't do this.


You trollin, brah?

Im thinking chefs know how to make tuna steak taste like canned tuna :)

jakek77
02-04-2013, 06:40 PM
A good chef would freak out at what you are proposing.

MetilHed
02-04-2013, 06:44 PM
A good chef would freak out at what you are proposing.

I think even a bad one would :)

OP: The texture (and to some degree taste, maybe) of canned tuna comes from the canning process itself, I believe.

klift808
02-04-2013, 08:56 PM
Im thinking of cooking the tuna first then grinding it, after il try preserving it in olive oil for a few days.

stuuudio
02-05-2013, 12:02 AM
For years now, I always had this goal in my mind with regards to tuna. My ultimate goal is to make FRESH tuna (tuna steak), taste like a canned tuna.

We all know that tuna steaks are tasteless when eaten grilled without spices, sorry to those who love to eat tuna steaks. Canned tuna on the other hand taste good even if its just tuna in water. Now question is, how do they do this? What is the secret recipe to achieve such taste using fresh tuna?

The reason why this is on my bucket list is because I always believed that canned tuna (or canned goods in general) aren't good for your health. I have heard from others that the long term effects of eating canned goods often could lead to sickness like cancer etc. With or without scientific backup for this claim, I still think it is not healthy to eat canned goods often.

I tried grinding tuna steaks first and then cooking them but they clump up in the end and become one whole block. Canned ones on the other hand are always filleted and they will never clump up even if you cook them.

Is there anyone out there who has the answer on how to achieve this goal? Chefs? How do you do this?

Thank you.

The thing is... canned tuna is the crappiest tuna out there, quality wise...Its the one that cannot be made into tuna steak. You wouldnt want to take a beef steak and make it canned beef.. would ya ? Tuna steaks are of superior quality meatwise (not necessarily macrowise) .. why on earth would you want to ruin a good steak. :(

Leeuf
02-05-2013, 12:07 AM
FYI: Consuming tuna is anything but very small amounts per week poses health risks.

This. You should just say goodbye to tuna and never look back.

Matahu
02-05-2013, 01:52 AM
This. You should just say goodbye to tuna and never look back.

Wait, wut? I have a can (295gm) a day. Where is this problem with Tuna stated?

Leeuf
02-05-2013, 01:59 AM
Wait, wut? I have a can (295gm) a day. Where is this problem with Tuna stated?

Tuna is very high in mercury which is downright poison. Eating more than a can a week (still too much IMO) is more mercury than your body can safely process.

Matahu
02-05-2013, 02:07 AM
Tuna is very high in mercury which is downright poison. Eating more than a can a week (still too much IMO) is more mercury than your body can safely process.

I have had such fears, but have never seen any studies or information that lead to concern. Might have to look for another cheap protein source then. Sad day.

xRedfern
02-05-2013, 03:43 AM
Tuna is very high in mercury which is downright poison. Eating more than a can a week (still too much IMO) is more mercury than your body can safely process.

Its sad how unaware i was of this, what a shame, i love tuna!

Leeuf
02-05-2013, 03:55 AM
Quick disclaimer: Tuna is not naturally high in mercury, but seems to absorb a lot from chemicals thrown into the sea. There are places where you can get fresh, non-mercury tuna from but the sad truth is that most of it (especially canned) is infected.

klift808
02-05-2013, 06:15 PM
The thing is... canned tuna is the crappiest tuna out there, quality wise...Its the one that cannot be made into tuna steak. You wouldnt want to take a beef steak and make it canned beef.. would ya ? Tuna steaks are of superior quality meatwise (not necessarily macrowise) .. why on earth would you want to ruin a good steak. :(

I just prefer the canned taste rather than the steak. lol

klift808
02-05-2013, 06:17 PM
so tuna in general contain high mercury levels whether it be canned or fresh, right?

Matahu
02-06-2013, 02:14 PM
so tuna in general contain high mercury levels whether it be canned or fresh, right?

Looks like it. I have done a little digging, and canned + fresh contain levels high enough to cause concern if eating over 340grams ( 12oz) a week for people over 150lb. Tuna steaks are higher in levels than canned chunk. Either way, i'll probably switch to salmon. Which still contains mercury, but at levels that are 35 times less.