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EliteDan
07-24-2003, 10:39 PM
I usually have a side dish with my meats at dinner, Baked Beans occasionally, but most of the time either a baked potato or brown rice. are they all right to have at dinner or should I have them at some other point?

Emma-Leigh
07-25-2003, 05:20 AM
I am of the opinion that as long as they are factored into your daily meal requirements, a little low GI carbohydrates some nights of the week will not do you any harm. This is especially so if you are highly active throughout the day into the evening.

Most people believe that 'carbs will turn to fat' if eaten later in the evening, but this is simply not true. What determines if you will put on extra weight is if your overall daily requirements exceed your overall daily expenditure. So it all depends on if you NEED the energy that the carbs will give you. The reason why it is suggested that you avoid these types of meals later in the evenings is because it is easy to eat a lot of calories in one sitting with these types of starchy carbs and so you can easily go over your needed requirements. Being later in the evenings it is then less likely that you will use this excess energy.

It also depends (to a lesser extent) on what type of carbs it is you are eating and how you are eating them. You increase your chances of storing the carbohydrates as fat if you eat a high dose of high GI carbs. The chances are increased further if they are consumed in combintation with high doses of saturated fats - such as in a creamy pasta dish or a risotto. This is another reason why high carb meals in the evenings have a bad name - because the meals that are typically eaten are fattening in themselves - not because of the time they are eaten.

So, a few nights a week (for example, on the days when you do your workout) add a little startchy carb if you wish. Just make sure it is low GI - so go for sweet potatoes instead of normal potatoes or pumpkin and for basmatti or long grain brown rice instead of plain white rice. Other options are legumes or whole grains such as pearl barley. It is also a wiser option if you eat the carbs 'cleanly' - that means minimise the saturated fats you take in at the same meal. And lastly, make sure you watch your portion size and that you have factored in the calories you will be getting in your daily count.

EliteDan
07-25-2003, 08:47 AM
Wow thanks a lot that was great information on it. So then I don't have to worry much at all.

derekmac
07-25-2003, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by EliteDan
Wow thanks a lot that was great information on it. So then I don't have to worry much at all.

Exactly ;)

Greg_SD
07-25-2003, 09:24 AM
Most people believe that 'carbs will turn to fat' if eaten later in the evening, but this is simply not true.
Your metabolism and energy needs change throughout the day. Energy needs will vary based on activity level. Later at night (when ever that is for you) and when you sleep energy needs are very low. Unused energy can be stored as fat. You can say that macronutrient timing isnít important but IMO it just as important if not more than total calories.


What determines if you will put on extra weight is if your overall daily requirements exceed your overall daily expenditure.
How can this be possible unless all of your energy requirements for the day were weighed against your metabolism for the day and your total calories for the day at one point in time?

Digestion and absorption doesnít start and stop for you all day waiting you to use the energy. It continues. The process is too complex for most of us to summarize in a post. My problem is that people are always trying to oversimplify it with old rules of thumb.

Sorry, overall your post was good. I just donít like those simplified rules.

Bio Layne
07-25-2003, 09:40 AM
Originally posted by Greg_SD
Your metabolism and energy needs change throughout the day. Energy needs will vary based on activity level. Later at night (when ever that is for you) and when you sleep energy needs are very low. Unused energy can be stored as fat. You can say that macronutrient timing isnít important but IMO it just as important if not more than total calories.


How can this be possible unless all of your energy requirements for the day were weighed against your metabolism for the day and your total calories for the day at one point in time?

Digestion and absorption doesnít start and stop for you all day waiting you to use the energy. It continues. The process is too complex for most of us to summarize in a post. My problem is that people are always trying to oversimplify it with old rules of thumb.

Sorry, overall your post was good. I just donít like those simplified rules.

Yes but the problem is you get down to splitting hairs when you make it too complicated... if everyone worked out before 1 p.m. then we wouldn't have to worry about reducing carb intake at night... but what about the person who works out at 8 p.m.

Things vary from person to person... and the notion that carbs put on fat if eaten before bed is grossly blown out of proportion.

derekmac
07-25-2003, 09:44 AM
Originally posted by Greg_SD
Your metabolism and energy needs change throughout the day. Energy needs will vary based on activity level. Later at night (when ever that is for you) and when you sleep energy needs are very low. Unused energy can be stored as fat. You can say that macronutrient timing isnít important but IMO it just as important if not more than total calories.


How can this be possible unless all of your energy requirements for the day were weighed against your metabolism for the day and your total calories for the day at one point in time?

Digestion and absorption doesnít start and stop for you all day waiting you to use the energy. It continues. The process is too complex for most of us to summarize in a post. My problem is that people are always trying to oversimplify it with old rules of thumb.

Sorry, overall your post was good. I just donít like those simplified rules.

I don't see how this is oversimpifying things at all. Caloric deficit and expenditure are relevent to lipolysis.

That said, there are times during the day when you are using more energy then at other times. Your metabolism doesn't grind to a halt in the evening; it does slow a bit.

Caloric deficit + quality of food (macronutrient breakdown) + timing of type of food are all relevant in their own way, esp. the first two.

So, I agree with you both. :)

EliteDan
07-25-2003, 12:44 PM
Well I usually workout at around 11 in the morning, sometimes at 12. I eat dinner between 5 and 6. So now what do you think about me eating what I listed as a side dish?

That's just for summer, when school starts up I'll be working out after I eat dinner so I assume that the brown rice or baked beans would be surely all right to have since I need those carbs pre-workout.

Emma-Leigh
07-25-2003, 04:04 PM
Originally posted by Greg_SD
Your metabolism and energy needs change throughout the day. Energy needs will vary based on activity level. Later at night (when ever that is for you) and when you sleep energy needs are very low. Unused energy can be stored as fat. You can say that macronutrient timing isnít important but IMO it just as important if not more than total calories.
Energy needs also vary throughout the day because of the changes in your basal metabolic rate and changes in your hormone levels. So I completely agree. Nowhere did I say that your needs do not vary throughout the day - infact I actually stated (in a very simplistic, easy to understand way) that later in the evening you are less likely to 'burn off' ingested energy - both because you are less active and because your metabolism is at its slowest.

I also agree with you that macronutrient breakdown is important and that you are better off eating most of your starchy carbs earlier in the day or around times when you are active. Keeping the carbs low GI also ensures that the slow release of energy is utilised for daily activity, meaning you are more likely to use the energy and it is less likely to be stored.

However, I also feel that as long as you are within your daily needs (This is based on your overall daily calorie needs and your preferred macronutrient breakdown) eating a little low GI starchy carbohydrates in the early evening ('dinner time') a few nights a week is not going to add weight.


Digestion and absorption doesnít start and stop for you all day waiting you to use the energy. It continues. The process is too complex for most of us to summarize in a post. My problem is that people are always trying to oversimplify it with old rules of thumb. You don't have to tell me about the complexities of digestion, absorption and energy utilisation. I am well aware of this (go back and look at some of my earlier posts on similar topics). I try to keep it simple because most of the people on the board prefere it that way. One of my first posts saw me flamed for using words that the 'average joe' would not understand, and since then I have been very careful about how complex to make posts.

Emma-Leigh
07-25-2003, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by EliteDan
Well I usually workout at around 11 in the morning, sometimes at 12. I eat dinner between 5 and 6. So now what do you think about me eating what I listed as a side dish?
I think that it should be ok. As I said before - if you are active throughout the day and you are eating within your requirements a small serving of carbohydrates (if low GI) with your meal at 5 or 6 will not be a problem. Especially if you do not get to bed for another 5 hours or so.


That's just for summer, when school starts up I'll be working out after I eat dinner so I assume that the brown rice or baked beans would be surely all right to have since I need those carbs pre-workout.
In this situation then carbs is a good idea to fuel your workout. So keep them in.

EliteDan
07-25-2003, 04:32 PM
Great thanks a lot.

Greg_SD
07-25-2003, 04:32 PM
Yeah, I know you 3 know whatís up :). Itís just a pet peeve of mine. I like the complex versions, lol.

I always see people use terms like: ďThe only thing that matters is your total caloric intake for the dayĒ and I start thinking about all the factors involved.

I suppose you do need to keep it simple for posts here. Most people wouldnít like it if you pointed a book out to them. Most people just want a quick answer.