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philbitty
10-04-2012, 10:33 AM
i'm aiming at around 4k cals on workout days and i started logging foods/counting cals for the first time in a while.
it's just after lunch and i'm at 286g carbs/96g sugar/44gfiber. carbs would usually be at ~250 for the day but i had a meal with exceptionally high carbs today so try to ignore that. anyways, my question is; is ~100g sugar/day too high?

Bonuman
10-04-2012, 10:45 AM
No. Eat as much sugar as you want.
Just make sure to hit minimum protein and fats.

MarcoDutch18
10-04-2012, 10:54 AM
No. Eat as much sugar as you want.
Just make sure to hit minimum protein and fats.

This + eat enough fiber. Which you are doing as I can see..

JasonDB
10-04-2012, 10:54 AM
Sugar is an arbitrary term and has a wide variety of types. Yes there are limits on specific types of sugars that when they are above a certain threshold can be linked with negative metabolic functions, triglyceride levels etc... but below that threshold they are no different from any other carb... such as fructose which can become problematic (but not always for active individuals, definately sedentary individuals as far as exacerbating negative health markers created by being sedentary or obese. However using the word "sugar" tell us absolutely nothing of value to answer your question. Also if you vary your diet day to day, having a day or two a week where you eat excessive amounts of fructose isn't problematic because this is a chronic problem not an accute one.

All the scientific jargon aside, if any amount of that sugar is coming from your dairy, fruit, etc I would not worry one bit and you can forget even knowing how much sugar you consume. If you are consuming all of it from Coca Cola or table sugar directly then you are skirting the limits as those foods are 50-55% fructose in each gram of sugar, and you are edging past that 50g mark and if you do so for a prolonged period of time it might have some negative effects on your bloodwork.

Before anyone jumps on that I am a flexible dieter, IIFYM follower and anti "fructose alarmism" but we do know that ultra high fructose intakes, which are rarely going to be seen by members of this forum as we don't chug 2L bottles of non-diet soda or eat 3 boxes of pop tarts a day, can have some negative effects on health markers... but again we don't know how much in active/athletic populations of course.

philbitty
10-04-2012, 11:20 AM
Sugar is an arbitrary term and has a wide variety of types. Yes there are limits on specific types of sugars that when they are above a certain threshold can be linked with negative metabolic functions, triglyceride levels etc... but below that threshold they are no different from any other carb... such as fructose which can become problematic (but not always for active individuals, definately sedentary individuals as far as exacerbating negative health markers created by being sedentary or obese. However using the word "sugar" tell us absolutely nothing of value to answer your question. Also if you vary your diet day to day, having a day or two a week where you eat excessive amounts of fructose isn't problematic because this is a chronic problem not an accute one.

All the scientific jargon aside, if any amount of that sugar is coming from your dairy, fruit, etc I would not worry one bit and you can forget even knowing how much sugar you consume. If you are consuming all of it from Coca Cola or table sugar directly then you are skirting the limits as those foods are 50-55% fructose in each gram of sugar, and you are edging past that 50g mark and if you do so for a prolonged period of time it might have some negative effects on your bloodwork.

Before anyone jumps on that I am a flexible dieter, IIFYM follower and anti "fructose alarmism" but we do know that ultra high fructose intakes, which are rarely going to be seen by members of this forum as we don't chug 2L bottles of non-diet soda or eat 3 boxes of pop tarts a day, can have some negative effects on health markers... but again we don't know how much in active/athletic populations of course.

awesome post, thank-you!
most of it was from fruit/granola mix/beans. they were canned beans though which obviously isn't a common thing for me.