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BolshoiSasha
09-16-2012, 03:46 PM
I am losing weight right now, like a lot of, I plan on doing 60 Lbs in 4-5 months. I am 7 days into my diet and have lost 10 pounds so far. I have created myself a 1000 calorie deficit and go on walks every evening and play hockey. After losing all my weight I plan on gaining muscle to look good. But from what I am told you have to eat a LOT of calories for your muscles to actually grow, if I increase my calorie intake by literally like 2000 a day within about a week in order to gain muscle, will I just become fat again even if I'm gonna be working out a lot?

WunSen
09-16-2012, 03:51 PM
youre attempting to lose weight to fast imo. for now eat a bit more and lift

ArchangelEST
09-16-2012, 04:28 PM
I am losing weight right now, like a lot of, I plan on doing 60 Lbs in 4-5 months. I am 7 days into my diet and have lost 10 pounds so far. I have created myself a 1000 calorie deficit and go on walks every evening and play hockey. After losing all my weight I plan on gaining muscle to look good. But from what I am told you have to eat a LOT of calories for your muscles to actually grow, if I increase my calorie intake by literally like 2000 a day within about a week in order to gain muscle, will I just become fat again even if I'm gonna be working out a lot?

You are rushing things. It won't end well. What you are doing right now is taxing your body to it's limits and you will possibly run your metabolism into the ground in a few months. Causing you to lower calories even more to meet your weight loss target. You'll lose a lot of fat, sure, but you'll also lose what little muscle you have.
And if you think you can then start bulking by adding 2000kcal, what you'll really be doing is setting yourself up to look just about exactly the same as you are now at the end of this whole undertaking.

The idea is to lose as much fat as possible during cutting, while preserving muscle mass. And when you bulk, you are aiming for maximum muscle gain, while keeping the fat gain to a minimum.

If you do it your way, what can happen is: you lose 60lb over 5 months, it's going to be maybe 45lb of fat and 15lb of muscle lost. So you'll be @ -45lb fat, -15lb muscle. You then bulk for 5 months and gain back that 60lb, of which 45lb will be fat and 15lb will be muscle. After 10 months you may very well be @ -+/ 0lb fat and -+ 0lb muscle. / Let's be generous though and say that you only lose 10lb of muscle during the cut - so you'll end up with -5lb fat and +5lb of muscle at the end. Still a far cry from noticeable results. Spinning your wheels.
Or let's say you do really good and your body holds on to the muscle and you'll end up with -10lb fat and +10lb muscle at the end of it all. Now we're talking, but you could still do a lot better.


Let's look at what you could do instead:

Let's say you lose 30lb in 5 months, with proper exercise as a beginner, you'll actually quite likely not lose any muscle at all and you will now stand @ -30lb fat, -+0 muscle. You then bulk for 5 months slowly, gaining back 20lb, and as a beginner you can probably get 15lb of muscle and only 5lb of fat. So 10 months from now, you can be @ -25lb fat and +15lb of muscle. This will be a massive change, trust me.

Taking it slow and working hard, you can make much better use of your time WHILE feeling much better at the same time doing it. Less starving yourself during cutting and less stuffing the face during bulking. Allowing you to enjoy your preferred lifestyle to a greater degree.

BolshoiSasha
09-16-2012, 04:43 PM
You are rushing things. It won't end well. What you are doing right now is taxing your body to it's limits and you will possibly run your metabolism into the ground in a few months. Causing you to lower calories even more to meet your weight loss target. You'll lose a lot of fat, sure, but you'll also lose what little muscle you have.
And if you think you can then start bulking by adding 2000kcal, what you'll really be doing is setting yourself up to look just about exactly the same as you are now at the end of this whole undertaking.

The idea is to lose as much fat as possible during cutting, while preserving muscle mass. And when you bulk, you are aiming for maximum muscle gain, while keeping the fat gain to a minimum.

If you do it your way, what can happen is: you lose 60lb over 5 months, it's going to be maybe 45lb of fat and 15lb of muscle lost. So you'll be @ -45lb fat, -15lb muscle. You then bulk for 5 months and gain back that 60lb, of which 45lb will be fat and 15lb will be muscle. After 10 months you may very well be @ -+/ 0lb fat and -+ 0lb muscle. / Let's be generous though and say that you only lose 10lb of muscle during the cut - so you'll end up with -5lb fat and +5lb of muscle at the end. Still a far cry from noticeable results. Spinning your wheels.
Or let's say you do really good and your body holds on to the muscle and you'll end up with -10lb fat and +10lb muscle at the end of it all. Now we're talking, but you could still do a lot better.


Let's look at what you could do instead:

Let's say you lose 30lb in 5 months, with proper exercise as a beginner, you'll actually quite likely not lose any muscle at all and you will now stand @ -30lb fat, -+0 muscle. You then bulk for 5 months slowly, gaining back 20lb, and as a beginner you can probably get 15lb of muscle and only 5lb of fat. So 10 months from now, you can be @ -25lb fat and +15lb of muscle. This will be a massive change, trust me.

Taking it slow and working hard, you can make much better use of your time WHILE feeling much better at the same time doing it. Less starving yourself during cutting and less stuffing the face during bulking. Allowing you to enjoy your preferred lifestyle to a greater degree.

wow that's a lot to think about. I always thought the way to change your body either way was simple but...

The thing is I want to lose as much weight as possible, as fast as possible. The bulking can weight and I feel as though I could start gaining muscle very slowly after I lose weight. Another question, during my weight loss I am planning to start working out while losing weight, I feel like I have more energy than I've ever had anyways, will that keep my muscles intact?
This is what I wanted to do while losing weight muscleandstrength.com/workouts/dumbbell-only-home-or-gym-fullbody-workout.html

If that is useless while losing weight should I just add about 500 more calories to my diet that I have now and lose weight slower?

BTW I am eating about 1200 calories a day right now but after a week I have experienced no fatigue.

gourfe
09-16-2012, 04:44 PM
I am losing weight right now, like a lot of, I plan on doing 60 Lbs in 4-5 months. I am 7 days into my diet and have lost 10 pounds so far. I have created myself a 1000 calorie deficit and go on walks every evening and play hockey. After losing all my weight I plan on gaining muscle to look good. But from what I am told you have to eat a LOT of calories for your muscles to actually grow, if I increase my calorie intake by literally like 2000 a day within about a week in order to gain muscle, will I just become fat again even if I'm gonna be working out a lot?
I'm guessing with your deficit your probably consuming between 14-2000 calories a day which is really low your going to lose a lot of muscle mass and look like a string bean. You should consume around 2500 and hit the weights over cardio maybe half hour cardio before you workout. The weights will build muscle and that will burn calories and fat if you eat clean whole foods (nothing processed) you will gain minimal fat and you will get a fuller more defined look.

BolshoiSasha
09-16-2012, 05:00 PM
bumpity

ArchangelEST
09-16-2012, 05:05 PM
The thing is I want to lose as much weight as possible, as fast as possible. The bulking can weight and I feel as though I could start gaining muscle very slowly after I lose weight

As I outlined above, if you try to lose it fast, you will end up losing muscle and running your metabolism into the ground. Which means you will need to keep lowering your calories to meet your goal loss, and this will make you weak, make you lose even more muscle, make you sickly as you most likely will end up being really low on some nutrient intakes... so yeah. Not a good idea. And if you just start gaining muscle slowly after that, yeah you can make some progress, but not as much as by "my" suggestion which is just about guaranteed twice as good results at the end without any of the stress during the process.


Another question, during my weight loss I am planning to start working out while losing weight, I feel like I have more energy than I've ever had anyways, will that keep my muscles intact?
This is what I wanted to do while losing weight muscleandstrength.com/workouts/dumbbell-only-home-or-gym-fullbody-workout.html

Whenever you want to lose weight/fat, you should aim for resistance training for sure. And yes it will help to retain muscle mass if your caloric deficit is under control. But if you go too low, like you are planning - working out might not save you at all, as working out itself technically causes short term muscle muscle breakdown as the body then tries to adapt and overcompensate. On a low caloric and nutrient intake, you will have a hard time meeting the needs of that adaptive process.
That workout will probably do for a beginner as long as proper progression of weights is utilized and the technique is good, but you'd really want to be hitting the gym good and strong if you want to attempt such a serious cut


If that is useless while losing weight should I just add about 500 more calories to my diet that I have now and lose weight slower?

BTW I am eating about 1200 calories a day right now but after a week I have experienced no fatigue.

I suggest you at-least double your caloric intake if not more. You lost 10lb in a week. You should aim to lose around 2lb a week, 3lb at most. Above that you'll be pushing it in terms of muscle retention.

BolshoiSasha
09-16-2012, 05:12 PM
As I outlined above, if you try to lose it fast, you will end up losing muscle and running your metabolism into the ground. Which means you will need to keep lowering your calories to meet your goal loss, and this will make you weak, make you lose even more muscle, make you sickly as you most likely will end up being really low on some nutrient intakes... so yeah. Not a good idea. And if you just start gaining muscle slowly after that, yeah you can make some progress, but not as much as by "my" suggestion which is just about guaranteed twice as good results at the end without any of the stress during the process.



Whenever you want to lose weight/fat, you should aim for resistance training for sure. And yes it will help to retain muscle mass if your caloric deficit is under control. But if you go too low, like you are planning - working out might not save you at all, as working out itself technically causes short term muscle muscle breakdown as the body then tries to adapt and overcompensate. On a low caloric and nutrient intake, you will have a hard time meeting the needs of that adaptive process.
That workout will probably do for a beginner as long as proper progression of weights is utilized and the technique is good, but you'd really want to be hitting the gym good and strong if you want to attempt such a serious cut



I suggest you at-least double your caloric intake if not more. You lost 10lb in a week. You should aim to lose around 2lb a week, 3lb at most. Above that you'll be pushing it in terms of muscle retention.

Thank you very much for everything, I really needed someone who knows this stuff well to explain to me. I am going to eat a lot more and workout more too. Thanks a lot for your help and saving me months of my life!

Alex

ArchangelEST
09-16-2012, 05:25 PM
Thank you very much for everything, I really needed someone who knows this stuff well to explain to me. I am going to eat a lot more and workout more too. Thanks a lot for your help and saving me months of my life!

Alex

No problem, glad to help. :)

Eating right and training properly is not really hard. It's mostly just time consuming. :) And depending on how bad is the starting point (How obese or skinny you are) - people tend to rush things which just ends up creating a less than optimal result. Our body is extremely adaptable, but it has it's limits. You try to push past them and there will be negative side-effects.
The key is to push yourself to the limits of what your body is capable of and no more than that. And it's perfectly understandable that beginners have no idea where those limits lie.

rand18m
09-16-2012, 05:34 PM
Op listen to what Archangel has said, please use this link to set up your diet and your intended caloric intake, come back with your TEE, your stats and your intended macro breakdown for feedback.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=121703981

n0useforaname
09-16-2012, 05:47 PM
Yes, listen to Arch.. Dont be one of those guys who asks 100 people until you hear what you want to hear. And then end up spinning your wheels.