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View Full Version : Training your own way VS programs



bodyhard
06-24-2012, 10:50 AM
I tried to train in such a way that I balance out my body (proportion/symmetry)as best as I can. In December of last year I said I would stop training my chest, arms and shoulders and concentrate on my quads, hams, lats and calves. Most people stated it was a dumb idea, few agreed with me.

I strive to get as balanced a built as I possibly can. My legs and back were lagging due to my accident, so I started hitting the back and legs twice a week with a program I put together myself.

Although some folks thought it to be a bad idea, it worked for me, my body is coming along very nicely and I like what I see.

Why am I posting this you ask? Well the thing is, a lot of people get stuck with the mentality/beliefs that a set program is the only way to go. Me, I say think outside the box, do what you think will work for you. It doesn't hurt to try something different. You don't need these so called programs, of course you should try them, but if they don't work, then do something else. Don't think that since you are doing a program that has been proven to work that there is something wrong with you, the program just isn't working for you.

Not everyone is made the same and just because a so called expert makes a program that doesn't necessarily means it will work for you.

So don't be a sheep, go against the grain and try something else. Some might think you are nuts, but the end result will shut some people up, trust me I've done it.....

paolo59
06-24-2012, 10:57 AM
I've followed some set programs over the years, but I always 'tweaked' them to meet my own, specific goals and needs. Seems to me there are no 'one size fits all' programs out there. They've provided some structure, sort of a 'backbone' for my workouts, but I've never felt tied to any one of them. After some years of working out and knowing your own body, you just learn what works and produces results for you, and what doesn't.

bodyhard
06-24-2012, 11:18 AM
[QUOTE=paolo59;904903243]I've followed some set programs over the years, but I always 'tweaked' them to meet my own, specific goals and needs. Seems to me there are no 'one size fits all' programs out there. They've provided some structure, sort of a 'backbone' for my workouts, but I've never felt tied to any one of them. After some years of working out and knowing your own body, you just learn what works and produces results for you, and what doesn't.[/QUOTE

Yup that to, tweak the programs to fit your goals/needs if need be.

discdoggie
06-24-2012, 12:11 PM
I've run several programs, some of them multiple times. They all "worked." But most were strength-based programs. I followed the outlined progression and saw my numbers go up.


Since spring I have become more focused on fat loss and bringing lagging body parts up to par, so I have begun training---for the first time---with something I have more or less put together myself (still borrowing tricks from the experts, of course!)

Time will tell if the results are what I'd hoped for. :)

djflex
06-24-2012, 12:17 PM
Ive run a few set programs. Always end up my own set scheme. Usually before the program is completed....

bodyhard
06-24-2012, 12:18 PM
I've run several programs, some of them multiple times. They all "worked." But most were strength-based programs. I followed the outlined progression and saw my numbers go up.


Since spring I have become more focused on fat loss and bringing lagging body parts up to par, so I have begun training---for the first time---with something I have more or less put together myself (still borrowing tricks from the experts, of course!)

Time will tell if the results are what I'd hoped for. :)

In my opinion, almost if not all strength base programs work. Not much you can mess up in trying to get stronger if you follow the basic concept/principal.

But in training for "look" or bodybuilding style training, well that is much more difficult on individual to individual basis. Because people all have different muscle bellies and insertions training for it (specific body parts/muscle) becomes the more difficult.

llahhsoj
06-24-2012, 01:21 PM
Up untill this point, I have been strictly an "instinctual" trainer. I know what body parts that I'm going to work, before I go in, but the amount of sets, weight, or number of excercises, I wing it.

I'm going to try a professional program here shortly, probably PHAT. Although, I have been saying this for 3 weeks.

Here is a link to a log that I just completed: http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=145624081

These workouts were good, most of them, but I wander just how efficient they really are. My volume seems pretty high. I am curious to see what other experienced trainers think of my methods, whether good or bad.

BillReilly
06-24-2012, 02:28 PM
So don't be a sheep, go against the grain and try something else. Some might think you are nuts, but the end result will shut some people up, trust me I've done it.....

This.

I've been at this for 18 months and have tried a few different routines. The best advise I've read on this site is to keep it simple and do what works for you. The second bit is not always obvious and takes some experimentation.

Guinea-pig
06-24-2012, 02:53 PM
BH you definitely have the mojo going on. But you have been at it long enough to know that in bodybuilding, there is no your own way. What ever you do Weiders got you covered.

bodyhard
06-24-2012, 03:24 PM
BH you definitely have the mojo going on. But you have been at it long enough to know that in bodybuilding, there is no your own way. What ever you do Weiders got you covered.

He cornered the market???? Nooooooo...

:D :D

Guinea-pig
06-26-2012, 09:04 AM
He cornered the market???? Nooooooo...

:D :D
Yesssss.......You would be under this
Instinctive Training (A) - This involves experimenting with your workouts and paying attention to how your body reacts to certain types of training. The fundamentals of bodybuilding training are the same for everyone, but we are all unique. The further along you get in your training, the more you have to fine tune your workouts to suit your needs. It takes time to develop this "feel" and have this type of knowledge. Whatever you are used to is going to feel best for you, but you have to figure out what really produces the best results for you and make adjustments accordingly.

Oceanside
06-26-2012, 09:11 AM
never followed a program..

never will !

edit

I take that back,I did waste 7 weeks on the Coan/Philippi program about 2 years ago.

mslman71
06-26-2012, 09:12 AM
The set programs are good for beginners. Gives them a chance to progress meaningfully while they figure out WTF they are doing and how their body reacts/operates. I didn't follow one and stumbled around for a couple of years until I got a handle on what worked for me.

Since I've been here I've picked up some new ideas from 'official' programs and those of other members, but I know what I like and am willing to do. After doing this for so many years I think most of us figure out how to tune our workouts to give us the right combination of whatever is want out of a routine and know how to interpret our body's feedback pretty well.

Iceman1800
06-26-2012, 09:15 AM
I've followed some set programs over the years, but I always 'tweaked' them to meet my own, specific goals and needs. Seems to me there are no 'one size fits all' programs out there. They've provided some structure, sort of a 'backbone' for my workouts, but I've never felt tied to any one of them. After some years of working out and knowing your own body, you just learn what works and produces results for you, and what doesn't.I agree 100% with this. Start with a basic program but learn to adapt as you go.

chodan9
06-26-2012, 09:16 AM
never followed a strict program.
I have borrowed liberally from many though.
no person trains in complete isolation though, everyone will eventually see and learn things from others in the gym or a magazine or word of mouth etc.

I have considered following a written out plan but have yet to settle on one that I like well enough.

wedjim
06-26-2012, 06:53 PM
I too have tried set programs, with some success. I'm also having success taking what the different programs taught me and doing my own versions with those ideas/methods. Feels like it's more about my dedication to doing the work, then the program. The structure likely helps those poor at maintaining a structure of their own and knowing when to vary it with a preset plan.
It seems to me that if you are realistic with your work loads, not over stressing, or under working and are able to vary things to avoid a "routine" you will see progress. Especially those are are capable of and allow the body the time it needs for recovery between work.
I don't think "we are all different" is true, the bodies chemistry is pretty reliable among each of the sexes. Of course genetics makes the barriers at either end of the spectrum a reality. But that aside the majority of the variations in results comes from what we "think" we are or are not doing.
Maybe fooling ourselves into believing we have done something when in reality we have not, or vice versa?

Proper feeding, with varying work loading and proper rest leads to gains of some kind in every person i've seen at the gym... who stays with it.

Marius_Ursus
06-27-2012, 08:29 AM
That's a good approach, John. You know that thing Bruce Lee said about, "Adopt what is useful. Reject what is useless."? It think it applies to all kinds of training, and you look like you're training toward your goals, so good job.

bodyhard
06-27-2012, 10:22 AM
That's a good approach, John. You know that thing Bruce Lee said about, "Adopt what is useful. Reject what is useless."? It think it applies to all kinds of training, and you look like you're training toward your goals, so good job.

Yeah that is a true statement!

Thanks for the props!

New AV is mad kool man.