PDA

View Full Version : Canadian oots...



SP1966
06-23-2012, 06:48 PM
They don't go out, they oot. Its not about, its aboot. Watching the coverage of the NHL draft the THN I can't help but laugh oot lood aboot it!

By the way you hosers, what'ya know about Dumba?

LisaSkinnoble
06-23-2012, 09:33 PM
They don't go out, they oot. Its not about, its aboot. Watching the coverage of the NHL draft the THN I can't help but laugh oot lood aboot it!

By the way you hosers, what'ya know about Dumba?

What's Dumba?

Would you like a double-double?

SP1966
06-23-2012, 09:47 PM
What's Dumba?

Mathew Dumba, D-Man picked seventh in the NHL draft by Minnesota, d'uh.


Would you like a double-double?

Always yes!

http://bestuff.com/images/images_of_stuff/210x600/in-n-out-double-double-7764.jpg?1173358374

LisaSkinnoble
06-23-2012, 09:52 PM
Oh you silly goose! Up here we mean coffee!

Tim Horton's coffee (former Leaf), two creams and two sugars is a double-double.

God rest his soul.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/pointofview/tim-hortons.jpg

Vytis
06-24-2012, 05:12 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population. lol

Anyway, back to my igloo. I have a seal to skin...

tsoden
06-24-2012, 05:43 AM
They don't go out, they oot. Its not about, its aboot. Watching the coverage of the NHL draft the THN I can't help but laugh oot lood aboot it!

By the way you hosers, what'ya know about Dumba?Aboot....wtf is Aboot?

tsoden
06-24-2012, 05:44 AM
Oh you silly goose! Up here we mean coffee!

Tim Horton's coffee (former Leaf), two creams and two sugars is a double-double.

God rest his soul.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/pointofview/tim-hortons.jpgMmmm. I could use one of those this am...

-=FLEX=-
06-24-2012, 06:56 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population.

Exactly.

rendylee
06-24-2012, 08:29 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population. lol

Anyway, back to my igloo. I have a seal to skin...

What's that you say, eh?

SP1966
06-24-2012, 09:10 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population. lol

Anyway, back to my igloo. I have a seal to skin...


Aboot....wtf is Aboot?


Exactly.

Go to this page and watch the videos aboot the draft this weekend, ookay? ;)

http://video.thehockeynews.com/

LisaSkinnoble
06-24-2012, 09:32 AM
I used to watch the draft. The son of one of my colleagues was a player in the League. He said when you're sitting there, you watch the cameramen and where the camera is going for the next shot. He said he'll never forget the feeling seeing that camera turn toward him.

Good times. :)

I didn't see the awards this year, but caught the highlights on TV the next morning at the gym.

Dave76
06-24-2012, 11:45 AM
Go to this page and watch the videos aboot the draft this weekend, ookay? ;)

http://video.thehockeynews.com/
The word is used at 16 seconds, and I hear "aboot". I find it interesting that Canadians don't hear it. I suspect it's because their accents are different from mine and they likely pronounce "aboot" differently than I. In this part of the world, aka Texas, the word is pronounced more like "abouwt", with a definite W sound at the end. I think I pick up on the lack of the W sound and hear it as "aboot". Since there is no W in "about" and I pronounce it that way, I'd agree that the Canadian version is more correct.

IronCharles
06-24-2012, 11:57 AM
Since there is no W in "about" and I pronounce it that way, I'd agree that the Canadian version is more correct.So, you would pronounce "pout" as "poot"? :D


"Stop pooting, or I'll give you something to poot aboot!"

Dave76
06-24-2012, 12:03 PM
So, you would pronounce "pout" as "poot"? :D


"Stop pooting, or I'll give you something to poot aboot!"
I pronounce it "powt". I don't recall hearing a Canadian say the word. I suspect I'd hear it more as "pah-oot".

Given our different accents, it's hard to describe what I hear with phonetic spellings. It's phonetic to me but with different accents, even phonetic spellings would be different among us.

It looks like I caught you before the edit. Good thing, too, because I am seriously lol'ing at the last line. :D

IronCharles
06-24-2012, 12:15 PM
It looks like I caught you before the edit. Good thing, too, because I am seriously lol'ing at the last line. :DAnd I'm seriously lol'ing at you thinking I made a mistake! :D

Dave76
06-24-2012, 12:16 PM
And I'm seriously lol'ing at you thinking I made a mistake! :D
Bazinga!

LisaSkinnoble
06-24-2012, 12:26 PM
I have no idea what you guys are talking aboot.

Years ago, my mom was shopping in Buffalo. She was buying a pair of pierced earrings. The saleslady asked "Do you want the backs?"

Mother was confused. Of course she wanted the backs - how else would they stay in her ears? As she was thinking this, she gave the saleslady a quizzical look. The woman held up the box and repeated: Do you want the bax?

:D

SP1966
06-24-2012, 12:27 PM
And I'm seriously lol'ing at you thinking I made a mistake! :D

You did make a mistake given he stated that Texan's add the non-existant w to those words. Your comment would have been right had it been pointed north of the border.

DubfromGA
06-25-2012, 07:30 AM
I have no idea what you guys are talking aboot.

Years ago, my mom was shopping in Buffalo. She was buying a pair of pierced earrings. The saleslady asked "Do you want the backs?"

Mother was confused. Of course she wanted the backs - how else would they stay in her ears? As she was thinking this, she gave the saleslady a quizzical look. The woman held up the box and repeated: Do you want the bax?

:D


Great point. There is a unique accent. Recently watched Long Island Medium with my wife, "ooohyea, I'm tawking ta Spearette now". Crazy accent.

"Pick up da phone and cawl sumbody".

GuyJin
06-25-2012, 07:55 AM
They always used 'aboot' in Southpark, the movie, Bigger, Longer, and Uncut.

Then again, they called Anne Murray a bitch so maybe they got it halfway right.:D

mslman71
06-25-2012, 08:00 AM
Go to this page and watch the videos aboot the draft this weekend, ookay? ;)

[url]http://video.thehockeynews.com/[url]

lol, it's not quite as strong as 'a boot' but it definitely is similar.

trymarine
06-25-2012, 08:38 AM
They always used 'aboot' in Southpark, the movie, Bigger, Longer, and Uncut.

Then again, they called Anne Murray a bitch so maybe they got it halfway right.:D

Terence and Philip,two of my heroes.Childish humour maybe,but Stan,Cartman,and the rest of the gang
sure know how to tickle me.

GuyJin
06-25-2012, 08:55 AM
Terence and Philip,two of my heroes.Childish humour maybe,but Stan,Cartman,and the rest of the gang
sure know how to tickle me.

---

Elmo would love you for that last line but ask yourself this: What would Brian Boitano do?

:D

Karl_Hungus
06-25-2012, 09:21 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population. lol

Anyway, back to my igloo. I have a seal to skin...

Seriously? I've only been to Canada twice -- Both times to Vancouver, and I heard it all the time while there.

Frnkd
06-25-2012, 03:06 PM
Seriously? I've only been to Canada twice -- Both times to Vancouver, and I heard it all the time while there.

Eh?

Vytis
06-25-2012, 04:24 PM
Seriously? I've only been to Canada twice -- Both times to Vancouver, and I heard it all the time while there.


Eh?

Seriously...aboot is something I never hear. But "eh", hell I use this all the time myself....now that is the mark of a true Canadian, lol.

V-240
06-25-2012, 06:27 PM
A-boot? I always hear it as a-boat.

:)

trymarine
06-25-2012, 06:58 PM
---

Elmo would love you for that last line but ask yourself this: What would Brian Boitano do?

:D

He'd sure kick an ass or two,that's what Brian Boitano'd do.

ArchAngel'73
06-25-2012, 07:49 PM
Whatever slang some of my people may sling it sure beats the sh*t out of "ruff", as in "I kicked the ball on the roof".

or that gawdamn butchering of the English language found in the south and slums of America.

And really...what the phuck is up with "Arkansas"?

Are Kansas.
Stupid damn name, just like Saskatchewan.


Sh*t slinging works both ways folks.;)

SP1966
06-25-2012, 07:54 PM
And really...what the phuck is up with "Arkansas"?


What aboot I Da Ho?

ArchAngel'73
06-25-2012, 07:57 PM
What aboot I Da Ho?

WHO??????????????





















:D
-and if you are I ain't payin'! :p

SP1966
06-25-2012, 07:58 PM
WHO?????????????


:D
-and if you are I ain't payin'! :p

Cheap bastage! :eek:

LOL

Karl_Hungus
06-25-2012, 08:04 PM
A-boot? I always hear it as a-boat.

:)

Yeah, to me it sounds like a cross between abut and aboat. Anybody watch Surivorman? I notice he (Les Stroud) says it like that too.

Ed_Hitchens
06-25-2012, 09:12 PM
I've lived in Canada my entire life, east coast, west coast, and Ontario, and I've never heard anyone say "a-boot". It's just a comedic exaggeration of how a French Canadian might say it, a bit of a vocal caricature. Then again, I was born in the Maritimes, where it seems every community has their own accents and local dialects, so maybe I just don't hear it. My father is from the Annapolis Valley and he pronounces "measure" as "may-shur" and says things like "I seen him yesterday..."

One thing I do find amusing is how Maritimers share many of the same inflections as people in Maine and other parts of New England. We're all the same people.

bcapprentice
06-25-2012, 09:19 PM
If we really want to have fun we could make fun of Quebec English

an example:

I have to go to a reunion meeting to discuss the possibility of getting a subvention from the caisse.

LisaSkinnoble
06-26-2012, 07:08 AM
If we really want to have fun we could make fun of Quebec English

an example:

I have to go to a reunion meeting to discuss the possibility of getting a subvention from the caisse.

I'd like two eggs side-by-each and a pair of toasts, s'il vous plait. :D

trymarine
06-26-2012, 08:52 AM
C'mon folks,cut it oot, otherwise Canada will declare war on America.

hochspeyer
06-26-2012, 11:13 AM
Aboot....wtf is Aboot?

Half a pair?

Whiskeyjack
06-26-2012, 11:18 AM
Funny how that stereotype gets perpetuated. I've never personally met any Canadian who says "aboot". Maybe our countrymen from the Maritimes might, so that would be less that 1% of the population. lol

Anyway, back to my igloo. I have a seal to skin...

I'm actually guilty of this way of speaking. I sometimes hear myself doing it. But of course I am from the Maritimes.

hochspeyer
06-26-2012, 11:23 AM
I'm actually guilty of this way of speaking. I sometimes hear myself doing it. But of course I am from the Maritimes.
"Of" is a pretty big word in you neck of the woods, eh? :)

Whiskeyjack
06-26-2012, 11:33 AM
"Of" is a pretty big word in you neck of the woods, eh? :)

Je ne comprends pas, mon ami.

But having lived on both Canadian coasts for many years - BC, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and visiting pretty much everywhere else in Canada and many places in the US, particularly on the seabords, I can say unequivocally that there are many accents. Accent interests me having studied linguistics and language in university. I used to be pinned for my Newfoundland accent and pretty much removed it over time.

Newfoundland alone has many accents; those on the northeast coast sound Irish. Nova Scotians have native, French Acadian, and Scottish accentual roots. And of course comparing Quebecois French to Parisian is as radical as Newfoundland English to the Queen's Oxford English.

American accents seem quite extreme to my Canadian ear, especially the Texan, Mississippian, and the New England.

Last time I was in Mexico a Yank nailed me for saying "eh" but then I could say the same "aboot" "you-all".

Ed_Hitchens
06-26-2012, 11:38 AM
But of course I am from the Maritimes.

Jelly, brah. I escaped NS for several years but got hauled back for family reasons. Still plotting an eventual run for it... ;)

Beautiful place, but not much going on.

hochspeyer
06-26-2012, 11:39 AM
Je ne comprends pas, mon ami.

But having lived on both Canadian coasts for many years - BC, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and visiting pretty much everywhere else in Canada and many places in the US, particularly on the seabords, I can say unequivocally that there are many accents. Accent interests me having studied linguistics and language in university. I used to be pinned for my Newfoundland accent and pretty much removed it over time.

Newfoundland alone has many accents; those on the northeast coast sound Irish. Nova Scotians have native, French Acadian, and Scottish accentual roots. And of course comparing Quebecois French to Parisian is as radical as Newfoundland English to the Queen's Oxford English.

American accents seem quite extreme to my Canadian ear, especially the Texan, Mississippian, and the New England.

Last time I was in Mexico a Yank nailed me for saying "eh" but then I could say the same "aboot" "you-all".
My FIL is from Texas, and MIL from Maryland. They are in their 70's (I think) and you'd never know she's lived in Texas for most of her life.

Whiskeyjack
06-26-2012, 11:44 AM
My FIL is from Texas, and MIL from Maryland. They are in their 70's (I think) and you'd never know she's lived in Texas for most of her life.

Sometimes an outsider would notice when others wouldn't. And then of course some people have a lesser degree of prevalent accent. My father's Newfoundland accent was very minimal though he was surrounded by very extreme versions.

John/Bodyhard once posted a recording of his voice here and his NYC/Bronx accent was very obvious to me; it was listening to the guys on Welcome Back Kotter, which was my first exposure to that sound in the '70s (before Saturday Night Fever and Taxi).

The New English rhotic accent of "Boston Rob" really stands out too.

hochspeyer
06-26-2012, 12:59 PM
MIL's accent is the sort where she cannor leave a vowel at the end of a sentence. If the unfortunate word ends in a vowel (that is not silent) and ends the sentence, it gets an "R".

Whiskeyjack
06-26-2012, 01:17 PM
MIL's accent is the sort where she cannor leave a vowel at the end of a sentence. If the unfortunate word ends in a vowel (that is not silent) and ends the sentence, it gets an "R".

Sounds like a version of the rhotic (adding Rs where they don't exist or removing them where they do).

Back home there's a tendency to do that with Hs (which the pronounce as 'haitch'). They even catalogue it in sayings: "'E drops the H in 'Olyrood an' picks 'er hup hin Havondale!"