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View Full Version : V-ger 'bout to start whoopin' arse



phikappa
06-21-2012, 03:15 PM
Finally, Hollywood got it right.



The Voyager 1 spacecraft, launched from Earth in 1977, will be the first man-made object to leave the solar system within the next year or two, scientists from NASA report.

"We are approaching the solar system's frontier," said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at CalTech in Pasadena, Calif.
The spacecraft is billions of miles beyond the orbits of the planets in our solar system, but it is still within the system, continuing to detect solar winds, or electrically charged gases ejected from our sun. Based on new data from the craft, NASA announced last week that Voyager 1 was nearing the "heliopause," which scientists believe is the border between our solar system and interstellar space, says NASA research scientist Eric Christian in Greenbelt, Md.

The heliopause is the point where solar winds stop and magnetic fields shift from the solar system to that of deep space.
"The latest data indicate that we are clearly in a new region where things are changing more quickly," Stone says. Voyager 1 and its identical sister ship, Voyager 2, also launched in 1977, between them explored all of the solar system's outer planets of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in the 1980s.

Back in 2004, the spacecraft crossed a boundary called the "termination shock," where the solar winds slow as they first meet interstellar space, which some scientists thought was the edge of the solar system. Where exactly the solar system "ends" is an ongoing debate among scientists. Voyager provides answers as it traverses this unexplored region.

"The most surprising thing about the outer limits of the solar system is how dynamic it is," Christian says. "Even though the outer solar system is an extremely good vacuum, there is still a lot going on. We're going where no one has been before."
Both Voyagers continue to make unexpected discoveries about the physical structure of the solar system. "We've been surprised by Voyager again and again," Christian says. "I actually think that the Voyager mission is one of NASA's best success stories. That both Voyagers are still working well, nearly 35 years after launch, and sending back important science from 10 billion miles away is truly amazing."

In about 200,000 years or so, one of the craft might come close to another star, Christian says.
Though they will lose the power to transmit data back to Earth sometime between 2020 or 2025, both will continue their journey into deep space. "The spacecraft will go on forever," Stone says.




btw, I have no idea what I'm talking about

-=FLEX=-
06-21-2012, 03:27 PM
What kind of signal travels that far that we can still receive it???


Is such a thing even possible?

http://suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com/archive/17585663/images/1326925916289.jpg

phikappa
06-21-2012, 03:32 PM
What kind of signal travels that far that we can still receive it???


Is such a thing even possible?

http://suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com/archive/17585663/images/1326925916289.jpg

It does sound crazy. Assuming the transmitted data travels at the speed of light, it would take about 15 hours for us to receive it. If my calculations are correct.

mslman71
06-21-2012, 03:32 PM
http://img.trekmovie.com/images/voyagervi.jpg


It's so far away the communication delay is over 16 hours. By comparison, the time delay (in terms of the speed of light) to the sun is about 8 minutes.

-=FLEX=-
06-21-2012, 03:35 PM
It does sound crazy. Assuming the transmitted data travels at the speed of light, it would take about 15 hours for us to receive it. If my calculations are correct.

Just looked it up on WIkipedia. Radio waves in the S and X bands and it takes about 16 hours for the signal to get here.

Mind = BLOWN

phikappa
06-21-2012, 03:40 PM
How is that thing powered? Solar?

-=FLEX=-
06-21-2012, 03:45 PM
How is that thing powered? Solar?

Plutonium powered electric generators, according to Wikipedia.

mslman71
06-21-2012, 03:46 PM
What kind of signal travels that far that we can still receive it???


Is such a thing even possible?

[img]http://suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com/archive/17585663/images/1326925916289.jpg[img]

The received power is about -180 dBW, which is 1x10^-18 Watts. By comparison a cell phone transmits with about a Watt or so.

phikappa
06-21-2012, 03:50 PM
Plutonium powered electric generators, according to Wikipedia.

I need one of those for my cell phone. brb, not charging again in my lifetime.



The received power is about -180 dBW, which is 1x10^-18 Watts. By comparison a cell phone transmits with about a wWatt or so.

FFFFuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu............

mslman71
06-21-2012, 03:50 PM
How is that thing powered? Solar?


Plutonium powered electric generators, according to Wikipedia.

Correct, RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generators) are used on all deep space missions due to all but zero solar irradiance at that distance. Basically, the sun is so far away it would take a ridiculously large solar array to generate even the slightest bit of power.

flairon
06-21-2012, 04:03 PM
I always wondered about signal degradation over such long distances, various changes in gravity, EM waves..etc, and then I think about how we're so sure that there is nobody else out there because we have broadcasted greetings into space with no answer and I wonder how much we know about what happens to signals over those kinds of distances. For all we know, it could turn to undecipherable static...except by the people on some far off planet in a distant star system, that actually communicate with static...and we just declared war, and the reason they haven't answered is because they are keeping radio silence to gain a tactical advantage.

djflex
06-21-2012, 04:09 PM
In....for soon to be confirmation of aliens and possible earth invasion

mslman71
06-21-2012, 04:15 PM
I always wondered about signal degradation over such long distances, various changes in gravity, EM waves..etc, and then I think about how we're so sure that there is nobody else out there because we have broadcasted greetings into space with no answer and I wonder how much we know about what happens to signals over those kinds of distances. For all we know, it could turn to undecipherable static...except by the people on some far off planet in a distant star system, that actually communicate with static...and we just declared war, and the reason they haven't answered is because they are keeping radio silence to gain a tactical advantage.

There's not much between here and there. The power loss is easy to calculate - google "free space path loss." For digital signals, there are things that complicate the encoding/decoding process but they have some amazingly sophisticated algorithms for encoding and decoding them in such a way as to minimize the myriad of effects that occur over long distances. It gets crazy complicated. I'm hopefully going to be participating in constructing a communications system for a small satellite in the near future and am desperately trying to learn about all this stuff. A lot of it comes across as black magic but it works.

We first started emitting radio signals of any meaning just over 100 years ago, which means there is a 'shock wave' of information that could possibly be recognized as something other than noise that's only 100 light years in radius. There's no possible way (that we know of) for someone to detect a signal outside of that sphere (per Einstein). In astronomical terms this isn't far at all. By comparison, the radius of the milky way galaxy is on the order of 50,000 light years.

V-240
06-21-2012, 04:49 PM
Science!

:)

Brackneyc
06-21-2012, 06:02 PM
http://i750.photobucket.com/albums/xx148/Gusandlyn/Montana%20and%20Oregon%202010/036.jpg


Ready up here.

StressMonkey
06-22-2012, 09:35 PM
Think of what technology was like in the late 70's. It boggles my mind that it's that far away built that long ago and still talking to us.

StressMonkey
06-23-2012, 08:47 PM
Now for the next generation. Man this was a well done video!

Ki_Af_o9Q9s

Nikonguy
06-24-2012, 06:31 AM
Now for the next generation. Man this was a well done video!

Ki_Af_o9Q9s

o_0 . . . . . . AWESOME!