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View Full Version : We didn't have the "green thing"



pvsampson
06-20-2012, 02:54 AM
At the cash register of the store, the young cashier suggested to the
older woman that she should bring her own shopping bags because
plastic bags weren't good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained: "We didn't have this green thing
back in my earlier days."

The cashier responded: "That's our problem today. Your generation did
not care enough to save our environment for future generations. You
didn't have the green thing."

She was right -- our generation didn't have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soft drink bottles and beer
bottles to the store.

The store sent them back to the plant to be
washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles
over and over. So they really were recycling.

We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor
blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just
because the blade got dull.

But we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an escalator in every shop
and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb
into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby's nappies because we didn't have the
throw-away kind.

We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
machine burning up 240 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry
our clothes back in our early days.
Kids got hand-me-down clothes from
their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right. We didn't have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every
room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief, not a
screen the size of the Melbourne Cricket Ground. In the kitchen, we
blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines
to do everything for us.

When we packaged a fragile item to send in
the post, we used wrapped up old newspapers to cushion it, not
styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, we didn't fire up an
engine and burn petrol just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that
ran on human power.

We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to
a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she's right. We didn't have the green thing back then.

We drank water from a tap when we were thirsty instead of demanding a
plastic bottle flown in from another country. We accepted that a lot
of food was seasonal and didn't expect that to be trucked in or flown
thousands of air miles.

We actually cooked food that didn't come out
of a packet, tin or plastic wrap and we could even wash our own
vegetables and chop our own salad.

We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an
entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need
a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000
miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

Back then, city people took the tram or a bus, and kids rode their
bikes to school or walked instead of turning their mothers into a
24-hour taxi service.

But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old
Folks were just because we didn't have the green thing back then?


Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a
Lesson in conservation from a smart-ass young person.

Remember:
Don't make old people mad.

We don't like being old in the first place,
so it doesn't take much to piss us off.

Frnkd
06-20-2012, 03:05 AM
Well said.....and written. you should publish this or send it to your local paper. Great perspective.

pvsampson
06-20-2012, 03:13 AM
My cousin actually wrote it.I thought it was good enough to share.

EDIT: I think he wrote it.He sent it to me in email a while back.

Tyrbolift
06-20-2012, 03:20 AM
My cousin actually wrote it.I thought it was good enough to share.

EDIT: I think he wrote it.He sent it to me in email a while back.I googled one of the paragraphs. It goes back to early '11, as far as I could tell, and has really made the rounds in tons of blogs and fb.

pvsampson
06-20-2012, 03:32 AM
Fair enough,I knew he was literate,but not that good!!

Still pretty good though.

BillReilly
06-20-2012, 04:01 AM
But Gaia wants us to tote around our food in grimy, filthy canvas sacks.

Why do you hate Gaia?

beachguy498
06-20-2012, 04:11 AM
I try to be as green as possible by recycling and trying to re-use things. I just put the pail out with the glass and plastic this morning. I hate to use plastic bags to store food in, big time waste. Just love those reusable grocery bags, I use them all the time.

We were pretty green back in the day, now people choose convenience over anything else. The plastic water bottles bother me on 2 fronts: The plastic is hard to break down and they're all over the place as litter.. and we don't seem to trust our water supply.

Rob

BillReilly
06-20-2012, 05:22 AM
http://youtu.be/zzLebC0mjCQ



http://youtu.be/4wS1dv3iat8

jdtemple
06-20-2012, 05:42 AM
http://youtu.be/zzLebC0mjCQ



http://youtu.be/4wS1dv3iat8I like the guy drinking from his plastic water bottle while he talks about how great recycling is.

LisaSkinnoble
06-20-2012, 05:45 AM
That was a good read, PVS, thanks for posting.

I used cloth diapers/nappies. They make great furniture dusters after the baby is toilet-trained.

I use the bins for my groceries. I can fit a week's worth of groceries in three bins. And when I use them, my store rewards me with points that can be redeemed for free groceries. I don't like the plastic bags, as they cut into my fingers if they're heavy. These bins have straps on them and are easy to carry.

http://fuzzz.gaulin.ca/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/pi187556038309943e.jpg

DubfromGA
06-20-2012, 05:47 AM
Great post, PV.

-=FLEX=-
06-20-2012, 05:55 AM
FWIW: The whole recycling thing is a big joke. I did my CMA with a guy that worked for Waste Management Services. He said 90% of the stuff that put in your 'recycle' bin ends up right next to the other garbage in the landfill sites. He said some of the glass is crushed to make filler for asphalt, but they only need so much of it. He the same goes for organic waste like leaves and such that is collected separately.

jdtemple
06-20-2012, 05:59 AM
FWIW: The whole recycling thing is a big joke. I did my CMA with a guy that worked for Waste Management Services. He said 90% of the stuff that put in your 'recycle' bin ends up right next to the other garbage in the landfill sites. He said some of the glass is crushed to make filler for asphalt, but they only need so much of it. He the same goes for organic waste like leaves and such that is collected separately.Funny you mention that. A couple of years ago, a local garbage service was busted dumping their recycling truck into the landfill. They charge you for recycling services and dump your recyclables right into the landfill with all the other garbage.

Found part 3:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fvz-z7CvsYA


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fvz-z7CvsYA

LisaSkinnoble
06-20-2012, 06:04 AM
These days, there seems to be much emphasis on recycling, and not enough emphasis on reducing and reusing.

BillReilly
06-20-2012, 06:14 AM
Funny you mention that. A couple of years ago, a local garbage service was busted dumping their recycling truck into the landfill. They charge you for recycling services and dump your recyclables right into the landfill with all the other garbage.


A good rule of thumb in these things is to ask what would happen if the force of government was removed. That does not necessarily mean the thing is bad, just because it has no popular support. In WW2, 70% of the troops were conscripts. It does, however, dispense with the economic debate. If the government got out of our garbage, most of the recycling rackets would collapse in a month. There are a few exceptions, but not many.

Recycling is expensive. The facts say it is no great boon to the environment either. But, the racket has deep roots in the political class now. As long as the current arrangements hold, the recycling rackets will be with us, along with the other green fads.

latebloomingmom
06-20-2012, 06:54 AM
But Gaia wants us to tote around our food in grimy, filthy canvas sacks.

Why do you hate Gaia?
sorry-who is this anyhow...a hippy God?
I see people in the stores with these bags all the time. I dont really care one way or another. If given a choice
I will take paper because I can burn it in the burn barrel which of course is polluting my environment.

beachguy498
06-20-2012, 07:54 AM
These days, there seems to be much emphasis on recycling, and not enough emphasis on reducing and reusing.

The 3 Rs.... I try to follow it. My metal food cans get the bottoms cut out and I flatten them out. Some packaging I'll cut into smaller pieces, I can get a lot in the bi-weekly pick up barrel this way. I like to reuse cardboard for templates, to cut things on. Old plastic soda and milk bottles can be cut down to use for scoops for plant food and other things. I try to think twice before I toss anything in the barrel.

Rob

crupiea
06-20-2012, 08:12 AM
At work we had a city inspector come around and he cited us for nit having recycle bins.

So we ordered them for every office to the tune of $600.

So a month later he came back and was very happy. I asked him how to label them and he told me and left satisfied.

So one of the bins was filling and filling and the cleaning crew didnt dump it so i asked them why.

They said there was no recycle bin for the complex so they had nowhere to dump it.

I told them to just toss it in the trash and we had a laugh.

Now whenever i see someone putting their items into one I get to have a secret laugh.

So really they are $600 blue trashcans.