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kenhorse
06-19-2012, 03:27 PM
i lost my dad when he was 90. at 89 he let his legs get weak and could not get out of bed to go to the bathroom without help. the family were he lived decided to put him in a care facility, he would not move back here with me so i went out and took care of him in the home. he started out very clear headed but i watched him slowly go down hill till he died 7 months later. so what i am getting at is get your parents to exercise, walk, something, it is sad to see them go that way.

Oceanside
06-19-2012, 03:43 PM
both of my parents were completely immobile for 2 1/2 years before they died..

Diabetes (double amputee) and Parkinsons/Dementia

GuyJin
06-19-2012, 05:58 PM
Father passed away from cancer at age seventy-one, clear-headed to the end. Mother passed at eighty-five, had a number of TIA's which impaired her memory and perhaps the onset of Alzheimer's although not sure. Very intelligent and well-spoken person she was; I hated to see her reduced to being bedridden. Her mind was still fairly clear at the time of her death--she could remember birthdays, names of all my Japanese relatives, addresses--but had she lived any longer that ability would have disappeared, too.

God rest both their souls. I still miss them.

beachguy498
06-19-2012, 06:48 PM
My dad is 95... he moves slow due to a stroke 10 years ago. His lovely wife who passed away almost a year ago had diabetes and couldn't feel her feet. My FIL just turned 85... walks with a cane and has one of those scooters. Gotta take care of your wheels, very important to keep your mobility as long as possible. I've been noticing a lot of younger people walking around with canes, all below 60.. the start of going down a slippery slope.

Rob

Oceanside
06-19-2012, 06:55 PM
My dad is 95... he moves slow due to a stroke 10 years ago. His lovely wife who passed away almost a year ago had diabetes and couldn't feel her feet. My FIL just turned 85... walks with a cane and has one of those scooters. Gotta take care of your wheels, very important to keep your mobility as long as possible. I've been noticing a lot of younger people walking around with canes, all below 60.. the start of going down a slippery slope.

Rob

those mobility scooters are a double edged sword , on one hand they help ya get around and on the other they help speed up the process of total immobility

hochspeyer
06-19-2012, 07:57 PM
I see lots of morbidly obese folks scootering around Sam's Club. I think OS hit it on the head when he said they're a double-edged sword. A few years ago when I was wearing my Borg boot, I tried a scooter. They have their uses. The next time, I brought fingerless gloves and used a manual wheelchair. Much better.

kenhorse
06-19-2012, 08:19 PM
I see lots of morbidly obese folks scootering around Sam's Club. I think OS hit it on the head when he said they're a double-edged sword. A few years ago when I was wearing my Borg boot, I tried a scooter. They have their uses. The next time, I brought fingerless gloves and used a manual wheelchair. Much better.
see a lot of morbidly obese here in tennessee. young people in their 30's in those scooters

MiamiSpartan
06-19-2012, 08:52 PM
Today is my folks' 58th anniversary...
Prayers for Mom as she has an angiogram tomorrow am....

beachguy498
06-20-2012, 04:05 AM
those mobility scooters are a double edged sword , on one hand they help ya get around and on the other they help speed up the process of total immobility

This guy has a bad case of arthritis all through his body. The scooter he uses for getting around his complex and when out shopping when a lot of distance has to be covered. At age 85.... I can see a nursing home on the horizon.

Rob

danap3681
06-20-2012, 08:26 AM
My father was 74 when he passed away from pancreatic cancer on 2009. He was actually diagnosed with prostate cancer in Feb 2009 and underwent radiation. At that time he was still working security for a local company and walked probably about 5 miles during his shift. He was retired from the Air Force, retired from Cloverleaf Dairy and Sears. The man worked hard all of his life. He could not sit around at home and do nothing. (actually I think he might have killed my mom if he stayed around her too long :)) From the day he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer he lived 18 days. He was at home in his recliner surrounded by his family. I stayed for the last 8 days and cared for him. I don't know that I could do it for anyone but him. I am glad he was so active and able to get around as long as he did. He told us he lived a long time and he was not afraid to go other than he hated to leave us all but he knew we would all be together again.

My mom was diagnosed in Feb 2009 with colon cancer and was lucky enough to have caught it early and was treated with mild chemo. She is diabetic and does not take care of herself and it drives me mad!!! She won't walk, smokes like a freight train and eats the unhealthiest diet I have ever seen. I use to tell her to take better care of herself because she was lucky enough to be still here and kicking around. She never listens. I know it wasn't nice but I told her one time if she didn't start taking care of herself I would not take care of her when she got down. (of course we all will but tried to make her realize she needed to try to be healthier)

MoldyGopher
06-20-2012, 08:58 AM
Dad died in his 40s due to alcoholism, type 1 diabetes, hard livin'.

Mom is 67 and does yoga 2x a week. I've never seen her stronger or more flexible. I keep cheering her on. Go Mom!

flairon
06-20-2012, 09:59 AM
My pops died at 59 in 08. He was a hard working guy that liked to play hard too and it caught up to him. He always said that he didnt want to die hooked to machines and unable to do anything. When he died it was quick. Had been building a deck and generally getting around ok, went to get out of his chair one night and that was it. He was in his home, with loved ones around him. I don't think a man could ask for a better death.

But i have a grandmother (by marriage) that is 92, goes to the Y 3 times a week and does water aerobics, and she's as spry as ever. I'd say she's going to outlive us all.

xCESAR
06-20-2012, 10:01 AM
Rip to everyone who has lost a loved one i will get my family fit to try help avoid this

kenhorse
06-20-2012, 08:06 PM
Today is my folks' 58th anniversary...
Prayers for Mom as she has an angiogram tomorrow am....
prayers sent

crupiea
06-20-2012, 08:23 PM
my Dad died in a similar fashoin. Just got older and couldnt get up or help himself much. Never lost his pride so that made things tough on him. Mom took care of him until the end.

In the morning he would get in the edge of the bed and mom would lift him into the wheelchair and then to his easy chair. he could help he a bit with a bit of a push off to get some momentum.

he caught pnuemonia and was in the hsopital for about 2 weeks and when he came back he didnt have that tiny bit of strength anymore so he was helpless.

If he slid down in the bed he would stay that way until i could make ot over the next day to pull him back up towards the pillow.

They were married for 50 years. i am divorced after over 20 years of marriage. So clearly i couldnt trust anyone to care for me in this fashion even after 20 years.

i saw him there and knew that if they had left me in that position in the bed, I would still be in it with no one to help pull me up towards the pillow.

i simply couldnt put myself in the vulnerable position so i decided to do something about it and to get into shape.

I have been up and down with the whole weight loss thing and working out but i damn sure am in alot better shape then the majority of people my age.

Its the old saying, "i do things today that others wont do so tomorrow I can do things others cant do"

I am going to vegas this weekend with my mom. she loves it there and we have a great time. time for her to live a little.

My dfad loved vegas.

i miss my dad.

thoffland
06-20-2012, 11:13 PM
Condolences to everyone who has lost a parent.

I lost my mom 12 years ago to heart failure, she went comfortably in her sleep. My dad died 3 years ago after his Parkinsons progressed and he ended up in the hospital with pneumonia and never recovered. The biggest thing was to make sure he went with dignity, which he did taking his last breath listening to Mozart from my iPhone via Pandora... which is funny in it's own way because my dad never even used a computer.

Neither of my parents really exercised, and neither did I until this year. Now I'm obsessed with it, and I hope that obsession lives until I'm hit by a bus.

paolo59
06-20-2012, 11:33 PM
We all came in on a Saturday morning, ICU, they left him there til' we had a chance to gather. Mom knew he was going to pass, that's why she demanded that we all go home the night before. One strong lady. I saw him there...what was left of him, not much. Old and all 'crunched up in pain!' That image sometimes bothers me to this day...then I remember what I told my oldest brother and his wife. "That's not even the skin of a cidada latched onto a scrub oak in Oklahoma come August!" :) Once they've left, they've left. What's left is just a shell. Gone home! Why look...well, we do, and we have to. We remember...but they've gone on to be just whatever the hell we're going to be. And in my case, he'll be the brightest star in the heavens! Much more than that. But enough said! :)

Just how is it that when some are gone, they are all the more present?

flyingeek
06-20-2012, 11:43 PM
Dad died of a massive heart attack at 60, but he was fit (he was a jockey back in the day and never stopped being active) - just bad genes.
Mom is 67 and walks at least 2 h per day (no joke) and jumps horses. GO MOM!!!

beachguy498
06-21-2012, 05:58 AM
I got another guy at work that walks with a cane... WTF? He's younger than me, but not in any sort of shape. Don't these people see what is happening to them? I firmly believe you have to keep moving or you seize up, like any other piece of machinery.

I'm just amazed at the number of people in the 30-60 year old range that walk around like they're crippled... and complacent about it.

Rob

jdtemple
06-21-2012, 07:00 AM
Sorry for your loss. I just buried my 95 year old grandfather shortly before Memorial Day. He had a pretty bad stroke and died just a few weeks after that. Toughest man I've ever known.

danap3681
06-21-2012, 07:35 AM
Just how is it that when some are gone, they are all the more present?

I strongly agree with this. My sister and I were laughing about some of the things my dad did when he was alive and things he said. I told her the first few months were hard because he never answered the phone when I called and he always was the first one to pick up. But I really don't feel like he is gone. I miss talking to him but it is not like he is absent in my life at all.

MiamiSpartan
06-21-2012, 06:56 PM
prayers sent
Big thanks!
Everything went better than expected, so she and my Dad are very relieved.....as is the entire family....