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flairon
06-09-2012, 12:01 PM
Maybe someone in here might know. I just built the wife a dining room table. It came out pretty good and now I'm trying to stain/seal it. I'm using a decent quality combo stain/seal. The stain is working just fine, but I can't get the clearcoat on it to not attract every spec of dust in the county apparently. I've swept the space, hosed it down, even did the staining with the doors closed and no fan kicking up any possible dust. This is the second coat. The first did the same thing and I knocked it down with light 220 sandpaper and hit it with the second coat. I've got 000 steel wool and even have polish/rubbing compound for cars handy (i dont know if that would work or not..but sounds plausible)

Any tips or am i just going to knock it down with the steel wool and settle for an oiled satin finish?

mslman71
06-09-2012, 12:12 PM
The best results I had (for auto) is to rig a makeshift painting booth with lathe and clear plastic, but that's probably not practical, so I would do what you did again and let the room sit for a day completely unmolested. It takes a long time for dust in the air to settle down. Might make a difference (?)

flairon
06-09-2012, 12:13 PM
The best results I had (for auto) is to rig a makeshift painting booth with lathe and clear plastic, but that's probably not practical, so I would do what you did again and let the room sit for a day completely unmolested. It takes a long time for dust in the air to settle down. Might make a difference (?)

Tried that already. Its been a couple days between first coat and this coat..about 4. I promised the other half I'd have this done this weekend and I'd rather not break a promise to her. She's short, but mean.

Karl_Hungus
06-09-2012, 12:16 PM
so I would do what you did again and let the room sit for a day completely unmolested.

I agree with this -- it is never really a good idea to molest your room.

BillReilly
06-09-2012, 01:27 PM
Without knowing your setup, I'd make sure you use a tack cloth on the thing before applying the clear. Maybe not the same with furniture finishes, but in other areas, the dust is often on the surface prior to applying the finish. People assume it was in the air, but it was actually on the surface. I had a summer job in college working in a paint booth. We used enamels for the most part, but I would imagine the same rules apply to urethane. If you did not wipe the article down with a tack cloth, it would always get hairy.

flairon
06-09-2012, 01:31 PM
before staining i wipe it down with a lint free cloth and mineral spirits

dbx
06-09-2012, 02:28 PM
Maybe someone in here might know. I just built the wife a dining room table. It came out pretty good and now I'm trying to stain/seal it. I'm using a decent quality combo stain/seal. The stain is working just fine, but I can't get the clearcoat on it to not attract every spec of dust in the county apparently. I've swept the space, hosed it down, even did the staining with the doors closed and no fan kicking up any possible dust. This is the second coat. The first did the same thing and I knocked it down with light 220 sandpaper and hit it with the second coat. I've got 000 steel wool and even have polish/rubbing compound for cars handy (i dont know if that would work or not..but sounds plausible)

Any tips or am i just going to knock it down with the steel wool and settle for an oiled satin finish?

What product are you calling "clear coat" and trying to finish it with? From your description of "time", I'd guess it's an oil based poly. If so, excellent choice for a table top. However, it can be tricky to apply and takes time to learn a few things. If you have done all you say, then I believe you have air bubbles, not a dust problem. Especially if you are already have let the room settle, used a tack cloth, etc.. And if you let the stain dry in for at least a day.

A few things about applying oil based poly:
1. Use the right type of brush to apply it, not just an "extra" one you have lying around.
2. Apply in one direction, not applying it with back n' forth strokes like you might paint. This causes those air bubbles.
3. Clean and soak the brush overnight in mineral spirits/thinner, and be sure to get most of it off the brush before you start using it for the next coat. Yes, a "wet" brush with mineral spirits on it helps make some very smooth final coats, but this is a trick best left for pros. It also can cause bubbles...AND cloudiness in the finish.
4. Apply very light coats, not nice thick ones. This is probably an amateur's biggest mistake.
5. Speaking of coats, for a kitchen table I would apply no less than 7 or 8, and probably more. Yep, a PITA, but it's worth it later.
6. Oil based polys take a minimum of 8yrs to dry before sanding and applying more. And that 8hrs can turn into 12-20hrs if you're in a high humidity area/season. When it becomes sludge-like, it can really suck. Again, thin coats!
7. If you've really mucked it up already, you might want to scrape (and then sand) ALL of it off and start over. You worked hard to make the table, right? Take the time to finish it properly.

Lastly, good for you for making your own dining table! :cool:

ReconRon1b847077
06-09-2012, 02:30 PM
Use layers. Sand between applications.... doesn't it say that on there?

flairon
06-09-2012, 02:41 PM
What product are you calling "clear coat" and trying to finish it with? From your description of "time", I'd guess it's an oil based poly. If so, excellent choice for a table top. However, it can be tricky to apply and takes time to learn a few things. If you have done all you say, then I believe you have air bubbles, not a dust problem. Especially if you are already have let the room settle, used a tack cloth, etc.. And if you let the stain dry in for at least a day.

A few things about applying oil based poly:

4. Apply very light coats, not nice thick ones. This is probably an amateur's biggest mistake.


I think thats my problem right there. I put a thin coat on the base, but really laid it on the top figuring that it would seal it better, keep it cleaner, no nooks to hide food particles..stuff like that.

This is my first one. I actually saw the design in an antique shop. We have a relatively small kitchen so i made a table that the top spins around and folds out doubling the length for when we need the extra space. The base is sort of a storage for tablecloths/place mats..etc.

The product is Minwax stain/seal. I wont use anything else but minwax. Made in the U.S.A.

pvsampson
06-09-2012, 03:35 PM
Face the fan out your door and it should suck the dust out.Pretty much all you can do without a booth.Also as you have done it is a good idea to dampen the floor.Always difficult at home,but can be done.

Be aware that there is a spark in your fan and you may have the potential for a fire hazard,if you are spraying.Wiping/brushing should be pretty right.

Whatanejit
06-09-2012, 03:56 PM
Pics of table please :)

flairon
06-09-2012, 04:08 PM
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4544881&d=1339283010
Thats where I'm at right now. The legs were premade, got them from home depot. The table itself is made from an old barn door, probably 100+ year old wood. I took it apart, planed it, sanded the boards then put it together. The top sits on a cross board/pivot that lets the table top turn 45 deg. then open up to twice the length. The top is actually dry to the touch even though it looks wet. I don't want to open it up just yet to do the rest of the top until that sits a bit longer. Its been sitting out in the sun all day, but i'm still going to give it at least until tomorrow. I have tiger oak chairs to go with it that I picked up at a local second hand store.

Whatanejit
06-09-2012, 04:15 PM
Goodness me.. well done - you have done a great job.

I've no advice on the varnishing task I was just being nosey :)

pvsampson
06-09-2012, 04:31 PM
One thing,make sure it is touch dry before placing in direct sunlight.It could blister otherwise.

Looks good.

dbx
06-09-2012, 04:54 PM
I think thats my problem right there. I put a thin coat on the base, but really laid it on the top figuring that it would seal it better, keep it cleaner, no nooks to hide food particles..stuff like that.

Yep, this helped create the problem that you have, but it was probably caused due to a variety of factors (such as I mentioned previously). But another problem, which wasn't totally clear to me prior (because of you saying, "stain is fine, but the "top coat"...) . Here's the deal, I love and have used MinWax products for over 30yrs, but.....beware of "all-in-one" products like this line that they have. Sure, they work fine, but are totally the wrong choice for a table that will see "usage". A stain first...and then, oil-based poly....every time for a project like this. The all in one deals are for housewives, just like they show in some of their older commercials to tout these all-in-one stains/seals.

*Also, like PVSampson said about sunlight? I'd go further...and say NEVER set a poly application out in the sun to help it "cure", lol. It's a disaster waiting to happen. It will bubble, blister, crack...........not good. It needs to cure under normal conditions.


This is my first one. I actually saw the design in an antique shop. We have a relatively small kitchen so i made a table that the top spins around and folds out doubling the length for when we need the extra space. The base is sort of a storage for tablecloths/place mats..etc..

You've done very well and should be proud. But unlike others here who look at that gorgeous shine in the pic, I know exactly the issue that you're having, and that it can be seen plain as day in person, and with proper light. It's very frustrating. Honestly? If it's pine wood, you're screwed. You would have to plane it all again to properly remove the poly AND the stain, evenly. If it's a wood that will take stain more evenly, you can strip it and start the process over again. Still painful, but necessary. Also, realize that, depending on the wood species, planing below existing stain may mean thinning your boards more than an additional 1/8th" so that you can apply a "new" even stain.

flairon
06-09-2012, 05:00 PM
The stain/coat is going on fine..its really just the dust. Yeah..its apparently pine..kind of softer too. The inside had some gouges it from who knows what. I was able to knock most of them out but some are relatively deep and if wanted to take them all the way out it likely would have made for an uneven surface at the least.

Do you think for the top i can just hit it with the 000 wool, put a thin coat and call it a day? Technically what you see in the picture isn't really the top..except when its closed, which it won't be all that often im guessing. That shiny side will be face down most of the time.

dbx
06-09-2012, 05:13 PM
The stain/coat is going on fine..its really just the dust. Yeah..its apparently pine..kind of softer too. The inside had some gouges it from who knows what. I was able to knock most of them out but some are relatively deep and if wanted to take them all the way out it likely would have made for an uneven surface at the least.

I don't think you're following me here (and thus, my earlier confusion as to whether or not you were using an "all-in-one" product. The stain IN that product went (past tense) on fine, but you used too thick a coat, making the poly side of the equation screw it up for you. Unfortunately, you cannot "separate" the stain and poly at this point...and this is why I stated that using an all-in-one product is a bad idea for such an application. Also, soft pine is not a good wood to use for a dining table. A hardwood is always preferable for such an application (think maple, oak, ash, etc...).

flairon
06-09-2012, 05:24 PM
I don't think you're following me here (and thus, my earlier confusion as to whether or not you were using an "all-in-one" product. The stain IN that product went (past tense) on fine, but you used too thick a coat, making the poly side of the equation screw it up for you. Unfortunately, you cannot "separate" the stain and poly at this point...and this is why I stated that using an all-in-one product is a bad idea for such an application. Also, soft pine is not a good wood to use for a dining table. A hardwood is always preferable for such an application (think maple, oak, ash, etc...).
Hmm. I think at this point it's going to have to do. I picked the door up from one of those places that pulls apart old houses and keeps the good stuff. I only paid $10 for the door. I'm pretty sure for our purposes it will work. I'd really rather have an antique tiger oak table, but if you can find them at an antique shop they range from 700-1000 with chairs around here. At this point I only have about $40 in the table. We dont really use the dining room table all that much, but right now there's nothing in there but a fold up plastic table and fold up metal chairs. Its more of a stuff collector than anything else.

latebloomingmom
06-09-2012, 05:27 PM
pretty:)

dbx
06-09-2012, 05:31 PM
Hmm. I think at this point it's going to have to do. I picked the door up from one of those places that pulls apart old houses and keeps the good stuff. I only paid $10 for the door. I'm pretty sure for our purposes it will work. I'd really rather have an antique tiger oak table, but if you can find them at an antique shop they range from 700-1000 with chairs around here. At this point I only have about $40 in the table. We dont really use the dining room table all that much, but right now there's nothing in there but a fold up plastic table and fold up metal chairs. Its more of a stuff collector than anything else.

Don't fret, my man. I really think you did a great job there. And...as long as the wife is happy, eh? ;) :cool:

pvsampson
06-09-2012, 05:56 PM
^^^This.You have done a great job

flairon
06-09-2012, 07:33 PM
Don't fret, my man. I really think you did a great job there. And...as long as the wife is happy, eh? ;) :cool:

Yeah, if momma ain't happy, nobodys happy. She wanted a cedar chest for her wedding gown a couple months ago. I found an antique one on craigslist for 10 but it was beat to hell and back, hinges broken, generally about 10 worth of firewood. Took about 2 weeks of massaging and some new hinges but she was so happy with it you would think it was made of gold. I spent maybe 40 on everything and added an engraved brass plate with our wedding date and I don't think anyone could get that thing away from her with a blowtorch and a ballbat

If she digs it that's all ithat matters

dbx
06-09-2012, 07:40 PM
Yeah, if momma ain't happy, nobodys happy. She wanted a cedar chest for her wedding gown a couple months ago. I found an antique one on craigslist for 10 but it was beat to hell and back, hinges broken, generally about 10 worth of firewood. Took about 2 weeks of massaging and some new hinges but she was so happy with it you would think it was made of gold. I spent maybe 40 on everything and added an engraved brass plate with our wedding date and I don't think anyone could get that thing away from her with a blowtorch and a ballbat

If she digs it that's all ithat matters

Yep. And...I built a "hope chest" for my daughter, several years back. I made it a strange combo of poplar and cherry wood...for accent sake. I also made all corners with dovetail joints (my most challenging project with dovetail joints of this size/length). I wish I had better shots..AND of finished project, but I don't :(.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest006.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest005.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest001.jpg

It actually looks a lot nicer/warmer, after the color seasoned/yellowed. Guess what caused this (intentionally)? Using oil based poly! She will have it for the rest of her life. And yesm,the cedar is real, aromatic, eastern cedar.

pvsampson
06-09-2012, 07:49 PM
Some nice joining on the ends of that box Kev.

dbx
06-09-2012, 07:58 PM
Some nice joining on the ends of that box Kev.

Thanks bro. I used a pretty damn expensive jig ($300...that I later sold at a "yard sale" for $200). I actually used it for a few projects, bit I could have NEVER done this project without it (Hell bent on dovetail corners :-)). I could tell from your earlier comments that you have at least, found that using the sun to help ready a coat of oil-based poly ain't a good idea :D :D. Been there, done that.....

But that's also what makes us able to help someone else, eh? ;)

pvsampson
06-09-2012, 08:15 PM
Glad to help.I spent a total of 7yrs in a bedroom furniture manufacturer.4yrs doing the mass produced "bread and butter",then 3yrs doing higher end.$10,000 beds and stuff.Also worked restoring furniture for a Master Craftsman in Nthn NSW for a couple of years on and off.A lot of Red Cedar there.Restored a couple of old timber yachts in my time to (as well as building steel and fibreglass).I had to stop as the chemicals involved were affecting me in a negative way,made me extremely aggressive actually.Can't even go anywhere near any paints (that aren't water based,)and fibreglassers etc.

dbx
06-09-2012, 08:45 PM
Glad to help.I spent a total of 7yrs in a bedroom furniture manufacturer.4yrs doing the mass produced "bread and butter",then 3yrs doing higher end.$10,000 beds and stuff.Also worked restoring furniture for a Master Craftsman in Nthn NSW for a couple of years on and off.A lot of Red Cedar there.Restored a couple of old timber yachts in my time to (as well as building steel and fibreglass).I had to stop as the chemicals involved were affecting me in a negative way,made me extremely aggressive actually.Can't even go anywhere near any paints (that aren't water based,)and fibreglassers etc.

I made this piece, just for another of 3 for her, for my daughter:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/ChestofDrawers002.jpg

dbx
06-09-2012, 08:49 PM
Hera ya go...that same daughter showcasing another piece of solid cherry work by pappa :):
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/BuffetHutch010.jpg

Along with a coffee table I designed...and made...:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking002.jpg

I have matching end tables and an ET for this piece, but don't have pics....

dbx
06-09-2012, 09:08 PM
And fwiw, I intentionally refrained from posting ANY of my own furniture pics here, at the onset of this thread. The only reason I even "contemplated" it? So I could show you that I knew wtf I was taking about....NOT to show you up in any way. Not my style..though, yes...I'll brag at times.

I have a lot of respect for my fellow DIYers. You, my friend, have done a splendid job with your first project like this. Seriously, you have just begun to construct some serious...."stuff"....

flairon
06-09-2012, 09:27 PM
Yep. And...I built a "hope chest" for my daughter, several years back. I made it a strange combo of poplar and cherry wood...for accent sake. I also made all corners with dovetail joints (my most challenging project with dovetail joints of this size/length). I wish I had better shots..AND of finished project, but I don't :(.

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest006.jpg[IMG]

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest005.jpg[IMG]

[IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/HopeChest001.jpg[IMG]

It actually looks a lot nicer/warmer, after the color seasoned/yellowed. Guess what caused this (intentionally)? Using oil based poly! She will have it for the rest of her life. And yesm,the cedar is real, aromatic, eastern cedar.

Thats damn nice work.

This is the $10 special

Started out looking like this
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4546031&d=1339301655

It was beat up, someone had put what looked like gate hinges on the lid, but they broke, everything was sloppy and coming apart. I tightened everything up, put hidden brass hinges on the lid, sanded, stained, clear-coated then had to search around for some cedar oil because it was so old it had dried out and ended up with this
http://forum.bodybuilding.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=4546041&d=1339301656

I started checking the markings on it and did a little reasearch. Its from about mid '30's, from a company that would go on to become Lanes Furniture. Apparently they started out making cedar/hope chests and occasional tables

flairon
06-09-2012, 09:37 PM
And fwiw, I intentionally refrained from posting ANY of my own furniture pics here, at the onset of this thread. The only reason I even "contemplated" it? So I could show you that I knew wtf I was taking about....NOT to show you up in any way. Not my style..though, yes...I'll brag at times.

I have a lot of respect for my fellow DIYers. You, my friend, have done a splendid job with your first project like this. Seriously, you have just begun to construct some serious...."stuff"....

No problem. I'd be bragging too if i could make stuff like that. I don't have really tricky tools at the moment. Just a table saw, router, some decent sanders. My buddy has a half decent shop with better tools he lets me dirty up when I need to.

I've got a bad habit of picking up stray pieces of furniture and redoing them. If I see something that is all wood on the side of the road, I'm not above pulling over and throwing it in the car and hauling it home for a project. The wife gripes when i bring home 'junk' but she doesn't say much when she gets a 'new' piece of furniture. I picked up an old 50's era waterfall style side table from an older lady that put it out for the garbage across the street from a buddy. It was seriously rough, and when i brought it home I heard about how it wasn't worth it..but she sure didn't mind getting it when it was all done complete with scented drawer liners for her girly stuff.

beachguy498
06-10-2012, 03:39 AM
My dad was a master carpenter and furniture maker. He did mostly custom pieces and my brother picked up on the craft too.

One thing I recall them doing was staining the pieces and finishing it with a spar varnish. It was available in satin and gloss and it wasn't carried in stores at the time. The workshop was dusty, no clue how everything came out so perfect either, but I believe the spar varnish "flashed over" quickly and didn't catch much dust.

Rob

dbx
06-10-2012, 07:14 PM
No problem. I'd be bragging too if i could make stuff like that. I don't have really tricky tools at the moment. Just a table saw, router, some decent sanders.

Man, I made my first (and 2nd, 3rd, 4th) set of speakers with the same basic tools. I made my bedroom furniture with the same, with the addition of a planer. None of this is rocket science, but ideas, conceptualized. I designed and created everything I've ever made.

dbx
06-10-2012, 07:15 PM
My dad was a master carpenter and furniture maker. He did mostly custom pieces and my brother picked up on the craft too.

Rob, you're a lucky man to have had a dad like that!

dbx
06-10-2012, 07:36 PM
A better perspective of raised panel doors, etc....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/BuffetHutch005.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Doorsandbackyard002.jpg

flairon
06-10-2012, 08:23 PM
Man, I made my first (and 2nd, 3rd, 4th) set of speakers with the same basic tools. I made my bedroom furniture with the same, with the addition of a planer. None of this is rocket science, but ideas, conceptualized. I designed and created everything I've ever made.

My next thing is a bed. I haven't decided exactly how or with what wood yet, i just have an idea swirling around in my head

I'm not tricky enough to do drawers, haven't quite perfected my dovetail cuts yet..im working on it.

flairon
06-10-2012, 08:24 PM
A better perspective of raised panel doors, etc....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/BuffetHutch005.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Doorsandbackyard002.jpg

that is really nice work. Do you sell your stuff or just make it for you?

dbx
06-10-2012, 11:14 PM
that is really nice work. Do you sell your stuff or just make it for you?

Just for me, bro. I learned a long time ago that making such things for money is a ....joke. Everyone you know wants something for nothing.....get's old quick.

beachguy498
06-11-2012, 04:55 AM
Rob, you're a lucky man to have had a dad like that!


Just for me, bro. I learned a long time ago that making such things for money is a ....joke. Everyone you know wants something for nothing.....get's old quick.

My dad is still around, out of the wood working for many years. People wanting something for nothing always drove him nuts too. I KNOW how tough it is to set up a dove tail jig and not bust off the last dove tail... raised panels are an art form. I've done it but working with the softer materials was frustrating for me. Making a dresser from stainless steel... more my speed and the piece will last forever, not much market for something that weighs 1200 lbs.

Rob

flairon
06-11-2012, 05:10 AM
Just for me, bro. I learned a long time ago that making such things for money is a ....joke. Everyone you know wants something for nothing.....get's old quick.

Yeah..i could see that.

I just would rather do it myself than pay for something made in some far off out-house then shipped here. Mine may not be as pro looking as something in a store, but it's mine. Nobody can say 'hey..i have one just like that..go it at wal-mart.

Plus i just like learning how to do stuff myself rather than rely on someone else. My next little project is just a small bookshelf. Nothing major and I could probably go buy a pressed wood particle board version for 10 or 15 bucks made in china or whatever that probably looks fine. But my redneck mentality won't allow that when I know I have the materials sitting out in the garage to do it myself.

The only thing I haven't quite perfected yet is making chairs. Need finer tools than what I have now I think.

dbx
06-11-2012, 09:52 AM
My next thing is a bed. I haven't decided exactly how or with what wood yet, i just have an idea swirling around in my head

I'm not tricky enough to do drawers, haven't quite perfected my dovetail cuts yet..im working on it.

My first "real" project was making a headboard....as the first piece of a complete bedroom suite. Of course, I'm talking furniture, as building decks, fences, etc., is something I've been able to do since being a teenager. Anyway, don't cut yourself short; you can do more than you think. You simply need to visualize it, draw what's in your head, figure out how to build it...and then do it. Show me a pic of anything made of wood...and I can reproduce a decent copy of it.


Yeah..i could see that.

I just would rather do it myself than pay for something made in some far off out-house then shipped here. Mine may not be as pro looking as something in a store, but it's mine. Nobody can say 'hey..i have one just like that..go it at wal-mart.

Plus i just like learning how to do stuff myself rather than rely on someone else. My next little project is just a small bookshelf. Nothing major and I could probably go buy a pressed wood particle board version for 10 or 15 bucks made in china or whatever that probably looks fine. But my redneck mentality won't allow that when I know I have the materials sitting out in the garage to do it myself.

The only thing I haven't quite perfected yet is making chairs. Need finer tools than what I have now I think.

When I split with my wife I left many pieces of furniture I made behind. I told her, "As long as it stays in the family and/or ends up with our children, I'm happy to leave it her." I mean, that's my main satisfaction; making and leaving something to be handed down for generations. I'm not going to be wealthy, so this is the best thing I can pass down, lol.

As for not having "finer tools"? Again, it's amazing what you can do with basic tools. I built these (and many more sets) speakers 24yrs ago, with nothing more than a $110 table-top table saw, a jigsaw and cheap sander (sorry it's so blurry):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Audio%20Gear/P1010001-3.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Audio%20Gear/P10100013-1.jpg

Two years later, I bought a jointer/planer just to save money by buying hardwoods. I figure the jointer paid for itself after I made the first piece (headboard). Seriously, it's a basic machine that you should look into. Then, you can buy "basic" hardwoods (planed on two sides, but only ripped straight on one side) and save a ton of money. LOL, everything in that pic made of wood...I made. The "stand" holding some stereo gear was originally built in 88', as a stand for a 35" Mitsubishi tube TV (huge...for it's time). I usually find a way to "reuse" anything I've made. I once made a cool CD rack (using dowel rods for shelves) and then ran out of space. My wife used (actually, she still does use it) as a blanket/comforter rack. I don't have a lot of my older items on digital form, but have hard pics of most. I'll try to snap a few "pics of pics" to give you a better idea.

flairon
06-11-2012, 12:24 PM
My first "real" project was making a headboard....as the first piece of a complete bedroom suite. Of course, I'm talking furniture, as building decks, fences, etc., is something I've been able to do since being a teenager. Anyway, don't cut yourself short; you can do more than you think. You simply need to visualize it, draw what's in your head, figure out how to build it...and then do it. Show me a pic of anything made of wood...and I can reproduce a decent copy of it.



When I split with my wife I left many pieces of furniture I made behind. I told her, "As long as it stays in the family and/or ends up with our children, I'm happy to leave it her." I mean, that's my main satisfaction; making and leaving something to be handed down for generations. I'm not going to be wealthy, so this is the best thing I can pass down, lol.

As for not having "finer tools"? Again, it's amazing what you can do with basic tools. I built these (and many more sets) speakers 24yrs ago, with nothing more than a $110 table-top table saw, a jigsaw and cheap sander (sorry it's so blurry):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Audio%20Gear/P1010001-3.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Audio%20Gear/P10100013-1.jpg

Two years later, I bought a jointer/planer just to save money by buying hardwoods. I figure the jointer paid for itself after I made the first piece (headboard). Seriously, it's a basic machine that you should look into. Then, you can buy "basic" hardwoods (planed on two sides, but only ripped straight on one side) and save a ton of money. LOL, everything in that pic made of wood...I made. The "stand" holding some stereo gear was originally built in 88', as a stand for a 35" Mitsubishi tube TV (huge...for it's time). I usually find a way to "reuse" anything I've made. I once made a cool CD rack (using dowel rods for shelves) and then ran out of space. My wife used (actually, she still does use it) as a blanket/comforter rack. I don't have a lot of my older items on digital form, but have hard pics of most. I'll try to snap a few "pics of pics" to give you a better idea.

I love those speakers. A buddy and I got on a making speaker kick in the 90's when we still had rack systems. I spent about 2 months or so at the local library reading up on audio properties involved in building home speakers just so I wouldn't make a vibrating box that created crappy sound. I only made one pair. Made of cherry. The side was had a cutout with a routed edge for design, 1/4" plexi that was screwed/sealed air tight so you could see the 'guts' and we took time making the inside presentable and mounted small led's in the bottom so they would light up (yeah I know...but we were young guys..though it would look cool) then lined the boxes with sound deadening material. They were fairly heavy compared to the average store bought press board version. There is a local place here that does speaker refurbishing that hooked us up with good subs/mids/tweets and they had covers we picked up for the front.

The guys at the speaker shop thought they were the coolest thing in the world and sounded great and when we brought them in for their 'pro' opinion they offered us $300 for them to use as a display in the shop. We snatched it up and were sure we were on our way to being Bose's next big competitor. I believe we blew it all at a strip club that night...so bose probably has nothing to worry about.

dbx
06-11-2012, 01:01 PM
...so bose probably has nothing to worry about.

Bose has a lot to worry about; educated consumers.

And no, not bashing them, as most audiophiles will do. Dr. Bose is/was a genius in his own right. "Direct/reflecting" sound was/is a great accomplishment ....in a very generic way. Additionally, their speakers are best utilized by the average person, who greatly limits actual sound output. For this use, all the detractors that bash Bose are so badly misguided. It really comes down to a question of preference; do you like diffracted sound...or direct, front firing speakers? The answer is clear, for me.

dbx
06-11-2012, 03:59 PM
OK, some horrible "pics of pics". These are pretty bad (just taken), but they are what they are...

I redid the vanities in all bathrooms in this house (2nd home, bought in 1990):
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010013.jpg

A shot of 3 different things; the headboard I mentioned, chest of drawers (with "27" TV hole...popular at that time) and bathroom medicine cabinet.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010010.jpg

Speakers
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010009.jpg
And it's making...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010012.jpg

Speakers, freshly made back then, lol...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010009.jpg

My first small experiment bending wood:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010008.jpg

And a fence and detached deck that I made one of my homes. You'll see that I used unconventional railings, etc., so as not to obscure any view.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010007.jpg

dbx
06-11-2012, 04:13 PM
A replica (to exact scale) of that 2nd home:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010006.jpg

It has a wind-up chime that plays Silent Night :).

My first "in-wall" stereo and CD shelf:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010005.jpg

Talk about bunk-beds for the boys.....I designed and made these. Only one point of contact with the floor (the ladder) from the top portion, and a trundle drawer under the lower bed:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010004.jpg

This is of desks(s) I made for myself, my dad, etc...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010003.jpg

I showed a pic of the "Cherry version", but this was the original that I designed. LOL, I have it in my current apt. :):
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v509/dbx/Woodworking/P1010002.jpg

I have lots more, but will leave it here.

Go out and do what you want to do. That's how we all learn..........

flairon
06-11-2012, 04:36 PM
Bose has a lot to worry about; educated consumers.

And no, not bashing them, as most audiophiles will do. Dr. Bose is/was a genius in his own right. "Direct/reflecting" sound was/is a great accomplishment ....in a very generic way. Additionally, their speakers are best utilized by the average person, who greatly limits actual sound output. For this use, all the detractors that bash Bose are so badly misguided. It really comes down to a question of preference; do you like diffracted sound...or direct, front firing speakers? The answer is clear, for me.

I like bose, but honestly i'd rather have a nice pair of vintage klipsch myself

dbx
06-11-2012, 04:42 PM
I like bose, but honestly i'd rather have a nice pair of vintage klipsch myself

LOL, um...yeah...

Do you have any idea how my speakers perform? They would cost you $3K, minimum for their abilities. I'm dead serious. They cost me approx $600 to build in 88', and I blew a couple of pairs of midrange spkrs before getting the slope right.

kathiiford
07-30-2012, 09:36 PM
If you want to live luxuries life style than you also have to design your home furniture modern style. This is very important to manage your style and you can also prefer some different furniture so its very easy to change your lifestyle. You have to select best design sofa sets for latest fashion so its give some modern look and stylish home design.

bakedNOTfried
07-30-2012, 09:43 PM
http://www.woodcraft.com/images/family/web4303big.jpg