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eomrat
06-08-2012, 01:44 PM
For a 45 year old with a BA in History, is an MBA from a well respected school worth $39,000?

Generally speaking, of course.

BillReilly
06-08-2012, 01:47 PM
For a 45 year old with a BA in History, is an MBA from a well respected school worth $39,000?

Generally speaking, of course.

Are you financing it or paying cash?

eomrat
06-08-2012, 01:49 PM
Are you financing it or paying cash?

Good question. 50/50, give or take 5,000

litljay
06-08-2012, 02:05 PM
I guess it would depend on where your starting from and where that MBA could get you.

itsagoodday
06-08-2012, 02:09 PM
If you have a job pretty much lined up upon completion of that degree, yes. If not, I'd be less enthusiastic on the idea.

Brackneyc
06-08-2012, 02:12 PM
For a 45 year old with a BA in History, is an MBA from a well respected school worth $39,000?

Generally speaking, of course.


Depends on how much you value education as a whole (not being flip here). If it is a means to a good paying job only, I'd say there are better (more job opportunities) choices in other more specific disciplines.

If you simply want the "challenge" of getting (as a major reason for doing it) an MBA (not an easy degree from most schools), I'd say if you can afford it, do it.

I paid cash as I went for both of my MSeD degrees. Both were the "only" means to getting into the occupation I wanted. Without them, I could not apply for the positions I am seeking, and there were no exceptions.

hammer92
06-08-2012, 02:13 PM
If you have a job pretty much lined up upon completion of that degree, yes. If not, I'd be less enthusiastic on the idea.

About a bakers dozen...

Jk.

Agreed with ^^

mslman71
06-08-2012, 02:14 PM
What's the end goal? Is it a specific job? Job opportunities in general? Are you looking to leave your current job for a new one, or bolster your worth within your existing job?

flairon
06-08-2012, 02:32 PM
An MBA in History? Other than being an educator...what is the goal job? I would think that unless you have some really good niche job that the ultimate employment couldn't be really all that lucrative as a teacher unless you're at the collegiate level.

eomrat
06-08-2012, 02:35 PM
What's the end goal? Is it a specific job? Job opportunities in general? Are you looking to leave your current job for a new one, or bolster your worth within your existing job?

I am active duty military looking toward retirement. I want a post graduate degree that allows a higher degree of flexibility. I still am not entirely sure what I want to be when I grow up.

djflex
06-08-2012, 02:45 PM
Given the current high unemployment rate, it would surely set one apart from the crowd.

BillReilly
06-08-2012, 02:48 PM
Good question. 50/50, give or take 5,000

If it is cash, then the pre-tax cost to you is ~$55K. At your age, you will work another 25 years, assuming good health. That money in a low yield investment will double by the time you retire. Something a little more aggressive means it triples in value. You can do the math for the financing options to determine the real cost over time of the investment.

As far as the other side of the ledger, it depends a lot upon your field. In finance, you almost have to have one, but the salary is much bigger than other fields. In the technical trades like engineering and computer science, it does not mean much at all. Experience and skills count for everything. Without knowing your field, it is hard to say.

A couple of other things to consider. The type of MBA is important. Marketing is worth a lot less than other choices, for instance. The better programs now offer an array of specialties. An MBA for computer science will be worth more in the tech world than an MBA in accounting or finance. The school is a big driver. I know guys with MBA's from the local state school and they may as well have a mail order diploma. Fair or not, snob appeal is a big deal in the world of advanced degrees.

Good luck.

crupiea
06-08-2012, 04:44 PM
Keep in mind that its tough out here. i did 20 years in the military and from a potential employers way of looking at it, I was 20 years behind the next applicant.

Most want experience in that exact field or something very close to it.

Doesnt seem to matter to them that you are capable of leading 100's of guys in every possible stressful situation one can imagine, they only seem to care if you can do this job like those guys who sre next to interview can.

Then you will get the young girl interviewing you interview. She has zero concept of what the military does and only sees an old man who has never worked in that specific field before. This is actuially a fairly common thing so dont be suprised.

Of course this doesnt always happen but it did to me.

I would wait to see what out there before spending big bucks on something you might not need.

When you think about it, with the economy bad the way it is, lots of people are choosing to stay in school and get their mba instead of try to join the workforce so now there are more people for potential employers to draw from who are competing against you.

It can work against you because people will see you as too specialized. just some food for thought.

Nikonguy
06-08-2012, 05:00 PM
C'mon, you know you really want to use that BA, teach World History and help run the JROTC program. ;)

tmonkey
06-08-2012, 05:06 PM
The only people that I have seen get good benefit are the guys that had the companies they work at pay for it.

Some have ended up at other companies but they got a free education and then a pay bump and some a promotion.

NorwichGrad
06-08-2012, 05:34 PM
I agree with crup 100%.

Another thing to consider is alumni network. If the school you plan to attend has strong connections with VIPs in the private sector, I say it's worth getting even if you have to foot 50% of the bill.

Lastly, when you start to transition to civilian life you will freakin hate it initially. But you'll adapt eventually. Make sure your resume reflects your military experience in a language the women in HR will understand. For example, instead of saying platoon sergeant, say you supervised 30 soldiers. The more Army lingo you can translate to civie language the better. Best of luck!

mslman71
06-08-2012, 05:42 PM
I am active duty military looking toward retirement. I want a post graduate degree that allows a higher degree of flexibility. I still am mot entirely sure what I want to be when I grow up.

Okay, I wish I could help but I don't have a good feel for what the fresh MBA market is like. Sounds like the networking advice is good though. There are a lot of MBAs out there so I imagine there's a fair amount of competition.

eomrat
06-08-2012, 06:29 PM
I agree with crup 100%.

Another thing to consider is alumni network. If the school you plan to attend has strong connections with VIPs in the private sector, I say it's worth getting even if you have to foot 50% of the bill.

Lastly, when you start to transition to civilian life you will freakin hate it initially. But you'll adapt eventually. Make sure your resume reflects your military experience in a language the women in HR will understand. For example, instead of saying platoon sergeant, say you supervised 30 soldiers. The more Army lingo you can translate to civie language the better. Best of luck!

The school I am considering is Norwich which, as you know, has an excellent alumni network.

A point of interest is that my branch manger offered me the Division Equal Opportunity Adviser position for the 82nd. That has got to improve my marketability, right?

Karl_Hungus
06-08-2012, 07:03 PM
Most want experience in that exact field or something very close to it.


Yeah, I was amazed at how true this was when I was applying for jobs a few months ago. I used to joke that I would have trouble getting a job at McDonalds because I had no previous experience working their particular brand of milkshake machine and that I was not certified in proper milkshake operation mechanics.

dbx
06-08-2012, 07:18 PM
No, not imo, based on the degree itself.

My oldest son, that I recently crowed about here, had a degree that and an additional MBA could greatly enhance (Especially for $$$ sake) for his chosen field. He would become "one of those guys who run the guys", so to speak, and make a lot more money (easily over 6 figures starting out).

But in my personal experience with MBA's, in general, these past 6-10yrs? MBA's have become a dime a dozen. I wouldn't spend the money on it that you speak of. Not for that backing BA....no. In fact, you might consider piecing together what your previous degree gives you a shot at, regarding changing it for future use. Often, it's not many hours away as some might be lucky enough to find out.

Bando
06-08-2012, 08:04 PM
One thing I've noticed with MBA's (I'm studying for an MPA) is that they never seem to be underemployed. I've never met an MBA that was working at a car rental place or something, but I've met lots of people with undergrad degrees that are underemployed. They may be too proud to take a lower position, but in my field it's all about getting a job, I imagine MBA candidates are the same way X2.

dbx
06-08-2012, 08:09 PM
One thing I've noticed with MBA's (I'm studying for an MPA) is that they never seem to be underemployed.

LOFL, there are so many unemployed MBA's in this country right now, that I don't even know where to start....


They may be too proud to take a lower position, but in my field it's all about getting a job, I imagine MBA candidates are the same way X2.

Which "fields" might you be taking about...where it's not about "getting a job"? :confused:

Bando
06-08-2012, 08:23 PM
LOFL, there are so many unemployed MBA's in this country right now, that I don't even know where to start....



Which "fields" might you be taking about...where it's not about "getting a job"? :confused:

I wasn't talking about fields where it's not about getting a job, but I guess those would be things in the arts, sociology, philosophy, music, where the education is the end, not employment.

Brackneyc
06-09-2012, 03:22 AM
I am one of those guys who looks at getting educated the same way I look at most other "high end" purchases. If it makes you feel better, and you have the means, do it. What I find in most cases is that the guys who want them (advanced degrees) for reasons that go beyond "getting a job," don't need them in order to get most jobs. In my case, and many others, it was necessary, but I knew exactly what job I wanted.

Secondarily, getting a degree is a lot like BBing in the fact that most of the time, you are alone in your pursuit, and whatever comes from it is based on your effort.

immuno
06-09-2012, 08:09 AM
If you simply want the "challenge" of getting (as a major reason for doing it) an MBA (not an easy degree from most schools), I'd say if you can afford it, do it.


This is why I'm doing it. I was always a little disappointed I entered the workforce right out of school w/out getting an MBA.. Even if it doesn't end up helping to "advance" me a great deal, I'll still have the satisfaction of finally having done it.




Another thing to consider is alumni network. If the school you plan to attend has strong connections with VIPs in the private sector, I say it's worth getting even if you have to foot 50% of the bill.


This is huge. Networking is everything. In many programs, said VIP's are "accessible" to MBA students. Networking opportunities abound.


I've completed my first semester, and while challenging, it was a BLAST. The only thing which is a little strange is intermingling with the students who are in their 20's. There were a couple of very immature and loud girls in my Econ class who I had a strong urge to strangle. :)

Brackneyc
06-09-2012, 09:10 AM
This is why I'm doing it. I was always a little disappointed I entered the workforce right out of school w/out getting an MBA.. Even if it doesn't end up helping to "advance" me a great deal, I'll still have the satisfaction of finally having done it.






To me, this is the best reason to do it. The rest will fall into place depending on the person. There are few things in life that can never be taken from a person, and education truly is one of those things.

AlphaDog3
06-09-2012, 10:36 AM
So far for me it hasn't been worth anything. My employer paid for it and I have been past over several times for new positions/promotions. Sometimes the candidates have been more qualified, but other times they definitely have not been more qualified. Some of them have been in different departments, but someone off the street is not going to know more than someone from within the organization. I have a good relationship with my bosses and they always give me glowing reviews in my yearly performance appraisals, but who knows what they tell other people.

I don't regret getting it though. Hopefully sometime down the line it will pay off and it wasn't extremely hard.. just a lot of writing which I did not really mind.

LisaSkinnoble
06-09-2012, 11:05 PM
I still am not entirely sure what I want to be when I grow up.

I don't know either. My son's best buddy (who is the smartest guy in their Grade) was over visiting. Super smart, great kid. His mom came to pick him up and we got to talking about course selection for Grade 11. She said "Who knows, at the age of 16 what they want to be?"

She went on to say "I don't know what I want to be!" This struck me as funny, because she has a great career in healthcare and has raised 3 great kids. But |I had to agree with her. I love, love, LOVE, my job, but if someone asked me what I would do if I could go back in time and start over again, I don't know. :o

-=FLEX=-
06-09-2012, 11:17 PM
I spent $30k + on my MBA and I don't think it did much for my career at all.....

NorwichGrad
06-10-2012, 12:41 AM
The school I am considering is Norwich which, as you know, has an excellent alumni network.

A point of interest is that my branch manger offered me the Division Equal Opportunity Adviser position for the 82nd. That has got to improve my marketability, right?

Absolutely. This skill identifier alone is something that the private sector can relate to. For example, the fields of Human Resource and law (civil rights in particular). Having an MBA would help, and could fast track you to mid management positions.

Btw, I got my MBA from Regis University in Colorado 5 years after Norwich. It gave me the advantage over the other engineers when it came time to switch track from being a lab rat to leading people..again. And yeah, the headhunter was also a Norwich grad (former army arty officer) so he helped me big time.

I have to say, however, that Norwich connection in the US military is much stronger than the private sector for obvious reasons.