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Brackneyc
06-01-2012, 06:34 PM
Have always wanted to learn to do this. I don't know anything about certifications, equipment etc...

Any quick tips on getting started, and maybe some experiences (good or bad) which may be helpful.

so-tex
06-01-2012, 06:46 PM
I don't scuba dive, but I have a friend that does. He started out going to a scuba store asking questions. They helped him get started, and also got him certified.

Bando
06-01-2012, 07:02 PM
I wandered into an open house at a college where a SCUBA group was putting on demo. I went through maybe an hour of instruction and dove to the bottom of a diving well, like 20 feet. I appreciate them giving me the experience, but it was pretty uncomfortable at first TBH. After awhile it was clear I would need something engaging to keep me down there for any length of time. I would rather be on top on a water ski having fun. So I would say if there's a reason you wanna dive (things to explore) do it, but I wouldn't do it just to do it.

slopecarver
06-01-2012, 07:03 PM
My mother is a PADI Instructor, Go to a discover scuba class to see if you like it then go to a real class. You should be comfortable in water first, I'm assuming you are since you want to dive.

Brackneyc
06-01-2012, 07:08 PM
I wandered into an open house at a college where a SCUBA group was putting on demo. I went through maybe an hour of instruction and dove to the bottom of a diving well, like 20 feet. I appreciate them giving me the experience, but it was pretty uncomfortable at first TBH. After awhile it was clear I would need something engaging to keep me down there for any length of time. I would rather be on top on a water ski having fun. So I would say if there's a reason you wanna dive (things to explore) do it, but I wouldn't do it just to do it.


My mother is a PADI Instructor, Go to a discover scuba class to see if you like it then go to a real class. You should be comfortable in water first, I'm assuming you are since you want to dive.


I have snorkeled around some sunken ships (put there just for snorkeling), and I loved it. I have also been a boater for the better part of the last 20 years (no boat atm, but maybe again one day).

I don't have a specific thing or destination in mind. I just thought it looked like fun, and while I don't think I'd want to go to any freaky depths, I'd like to give it a try and see. I do not want to get in too deep with equipment, only to find out I don't like it.

Corbi
06-01-2012, 07:21 PM
It can get crazy expensive just with the regulator, bc, suit, etc. Definitely take a few classes to see if it's even for you. I have only been on 3 dives but all 3 were at the Palancar reef just off the coast of Cozumel. We went as deep as 60' with our dive master and saw so many different fish and coral formations. Water clarity is nuts there with visibility up to 200' at times. Hand fed a leopard moray eel and saw a grouper that I swear was as big as a volkswagen beetle. Funny thing is our group had us newbies as well as those who were certified and been on hundreds of dives, us newbies used up our air twice as fast mainly because we didn't know how to conserve and slow our movemenst down.

Give it a shot Craig, I bet you'd love it especially if you already enjoy snorkeling.

Dave76
06-02-2012, 07:13 AM
I've been certified for 30 years. I, too, enjoyed snorkeling until I learned to dive. Diving is so much easier and much more fun. I own nothing but a mask, fins, and snorkel. I only dive on Caribbean vacations so I usually rent the BC and regulator. I've been to Cozumel more times than I can count, Grand Caymans, Belize, Jamaica, etc. My wife enjoys vacations in sunny places and diving is a sight seeing tour for me in those places.

To get started, sign up for a PADI course. I'm certified through the YMCA, which is less well known than PADI but I've never had a problem with my Y C-card.

HoustonTXMuscle
06-02-2012, 11:18 AM
I taught Scuba as an avocation for several years as a Master Scuba Trainer and Instructor for both NAUI and PADI, certifying approximately 250 divers/year at various levels (privates and classes). Aside from what's been mentioned above, my first piece of advice is to shy away from any store or instructor that tells you have to buy equipment other than mask, fins and snorkle and/or take one of their overly-inflated trips for certification. With the exception of perhaps a compass, you can rent everything else.

Oh, incidently, years before becoming certified, my first dives (1957) were on surface supplied air.