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ademyster
04-23-2012, 03:43 AM
Type 2 diabetes is common within my family and although I have not yet been diagnosed I tend to find that meals high in sugars/carbohydrates leave me drowsy and extremely hungry hour later. I also find that fasting leaves me less hungry than if I eat a meal containing larger quantities of sugar and carbs. I am currently 20-22% body fat at 210 pounds down from 247, in theory should insulin sensitivity improve with more fat loss and at roughly what body fat % should this occur?

Flex500
04-23-2012, 04:36 AM
Type 2 diabetes is common within my family and although I have not yet been diagnosed I tend to find that meals high in sugars/carbohydrates leave me drowsy and extremely hungry hour later. I also find that fasting leaves me less hungry than if I eat a meal containing larger quantities of sugar and carbs. I am currently 20-22% body fat at 210 pounds down from 247, in theory should insulin sensitivity improve with more fat loss and at roughly what body fat % should this occur?


ABSOLUTELY! Fat loss, exercise, and a proper diet will have a profound, positive effect on insulin sensitivity.

ademyster
04-23-2012, 06:24 AM
Thanks mate, it's good to know things will improve! Anyone have an idea of what body fat % things improve noticeably.

Flex500
04-23-2012, 06:33 AM
Thanks mate, it's good to know things will improve! Anyone have an idea of what body fat % things improve noticeably.

most people report an improvement based on amount of bodyfat lost. For instance someone at 50% bf who gets to 20% may have a drastic improvement to the point they are "normal" as far as blood sugar response and levels.

Then again someone at 25% bf who gets to 20% but is already in the nornal range may not see much difference. A lot of it depends what your situation is right now with blood sugar and how much improvement you make as far as weight loss and exercise program.

you may be normal right now...honestly if you are worried i'd get fasted blood work done and then get it down again after like 12 weeks. It should be pretty standard and fairly cheap and then you can really see the difference.

ademyster
04-23-2012, 07:56 AM
Cool, thanks mate. Measly repps

WonderPug
04-23-2012, 07:59 AM
FYI: Excess visceral adiposity, as opposed to simple obesity/overweight, is likely more of a factor.

SuffolkPunch
04-23-2012, 08:20 AM
Yes. I also think it's worth running a standard or cyclical keto diet for 2 or 3 weeks - until the negative symptoms pass (so that you become adapted to utilising fat as fuel). Then try re-introducing carbs cautiously.

SimplyShreddies
04-23-2012, 08:23 AM
Other than what has already been said...

If you're looking to improve insulin sensitivity, Birmingham university have been conducting studies recently about anaerobic exercise, which resulted in improvements in insulin sensitivity. I remember watching a documentary about it on the BBC, basically just 1 minute of maximal exercise (30 second sprints on a cycle ergometer) a day, 3 times a week, for 8 weeks showed an improvement of around 30% towards insulin sensitivity. So do this at the end of your workout, along with good diet, you'll be feeling great!

Just a little gem of knowledge i picked up ;)

ademyster
04-23-2012, 08:57 AM
Thanks people I am grateful for your input. I will send measly reps when I can.